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  • #16
    Re: Lance Armstrong

    I thought of a good comparison for tomorrow's stage into Paris. With the time gap being large enough that Ullrich cannot hope to make it up- it is like the 1500 of a decathlon. The guys are gonna go out and compete but if you need a 20 second PR over a 4:15 1500 decathlete in order to win, it just isn't going to happen. So they'll keep it close and respectable but the battle is done before that race even starts.

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    • #17
      Re: Lance Armstrong

      From the article:
      "With 2.5km left to race, Armstrong and Pantani had ridden away from the rest and at the final summit sprint, the rejuvinated Italian slipped ahead of Le Maillot Jaune to win the epoch stage to the summit of Le Mont Ventoux."

      Lance let him have that stage. Pantani dissed him about that and look what happened to Pantani later. Lance dismantled him.

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      • #18
        Re: Lance Armstrong

        >I thought of a good comparison for tomorrow's
        >stage into Paris. With the time gap being large
        >enough that Ullrich cannot hope to make it up- it
        >is like the 1500 of a decathlon. The guys are
        >gonna go out and compete but if you need a 20
        >second PR over a 4:15 1500 decathlete in order to
        >win, it just isn't going to happen. So they'll
        >keep it close and respectable but the battle is
        >done before that race even starts.

        Way to go Ben, the thread now has a legitimate track connection.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Lance Armstrong

          how little a lead is needed for any last day competition to be meaningful. if say the leader is only ahead by a second or ten seconds. then would the last day be more than just a symbolic ride to victory for whoever currently holds the yellow jersey?

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Lance Armstrong

            >how little a lead is needed for any last day
            >competition to be meaningful. if say the leader
            >is only ahead by a second or ten seconds. then
            >would the last day be more than just a symbolic
            >ride to victory for whoever currently holds the
            >yellow jersey?

            Yes-because of the various time bonuses.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Lance Armstrong

              >how little a lead is needed for any last day
              >competition to be meaningful. if say the leader
              >is only ahead by a second or ten seconds. then
              >would the last day be more than just a symbolic
              >ride to victory for whoever currently holds the
              >yellow jersey?

              Two things are important in determining if the the last day will be meaningful- 1. kind of stage 2. time difference. On #1 in 1989 Greg LeMond trailed Laurent Fignon by 50 seconds going into Paris. The Paris stage was an time trial (what Armstrong and Ullrich did yesterday). So they raced at 100% with LeMond winning the stage by 58 seconds, Fignon was second. LeMond won the Tour by 8 seconds, and permananttly introduced aero bars to the Tour.

              On #2- if the time difference was something that could be made up with intermediate sprint bonuses or stage win bonuses you *might* see someone attack the leader. That amount of time is around 30 seconds, give or take. But cycling is a pack sport so drafting is hugely important. Unless the time gap was something like 15-20 seconds any attacks on the leader would be folly. On a day like today where the sprinters are still fighting it out for the maillot vert, top sprinters jersey, there's not a chance in the world Ullrich could pick up time bonuses.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Lance Armstrong

                Armstrong won but if the stage would have been raced the same(not likely) and Ullrich was only 14 seconds behind, he would have won.


                17 H 31 - Armstrong Loses 15" Of His Lead In Final Rush
                Lance Armstrong finished the stage in 112th place. He was not given the same time as the stage winner, Jean Patrick Nazon.
                The rider in 2nd overall, Jan Ullrich, finish in 59th (at the same time as Nazon).
                The final leading margin for the winner of the yellow jersey over 2nd place is 1'01".

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Lance Armstrong

                  >>I thought of a good comparison for
                  >tomorrow's
                  >stage into Paris. With the time gap
                  >being large
                  >enough that Ullrich cannot hope to
                  >make it up- it
                  >is like the 1500 of a decathlon.
                  >The guys are
                  >gonna go out and compete but if
                  >you need a 20
                  >second PR over a 4:15 1500
                  >decathlete in order to
                  >win, it just isn't
                  >going to happen. So they'll
                  >keep it close and
                  >respectable but the battle is
                  >done before that
                  >race even starts.

                  Way to go Ben, the thread
                  >now has a legitimate track connection.



                  I'm completely with you

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Lance Armstrong

                    What exactly does he have to do to impress these jackasses?

                    ''He's certainly a star, but I don't know if he's a superstar,'' Hinault said.

                    As for Miguel Indurain, "Armstrong is a great cyclist, but it is difficult to consider him a legend yet.''

                    http://www.suntimes.com/output/mariotti ... jay28.html

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Lance Armstrong

                      I am sorry to say this, but unless you are a Frenchman, Spaniard or Italian you are an outsider in that society. Sorry, a Belgian is also accepted (like Eddie Merckx).
                      "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                      by Thomas Henry Huxley

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                      • #26
                        Re: Lance Armstrong

                        Miguel who?

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Lance Armstrong

                          >What exactly does he have to do to impress these
                          >jackasses?

                          ''He's certainly a star, but I
                          >don't know if he's a superstar,'' Hinault
                          >said.

                          As for Miguel Indurain, "Armstrong is a
                          >great cyclist, but it is difficult to consider
                          >him a legend
                          >yet.''

                          http://www.suntimes.com/output/mariotti/
                          >st-spt-jay28.html

                          The sport of cycling has been very soft in recent years.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Lance Armstrong

                            The sport of
                            >cycling has been very soft in recent years.
                            Tell that to Ullrich, the Karl Malone of cycling.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Lance Armstrong

                              >The sport of
                              >cycling has been very soft in
                              >recent years.
                              Tell that to Ullrich, the Karl
                              >Malone of cycling.


                              Thank you for reinforcing my point.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Lance Armstrong

                                >Thank you for
                                >reinforcing my point.

                                Sorry Jacques, Lance AND Ullrich would have kicked your butt. You have no credibility in any event-a little tale from the 63 Tour.

                                "Just one little problem. He had made the climb on his light time trial bike which was considered too fragile for the wild gravel-strewn descent. But Tour rules didn't allow a bike change for any reason other than mechanical breakdown. Anquetil's crafty manager, Raphael Geminiani,
                                had a solution.

                                With the top in sight Jacques gave Gem the eye. Jacques yelled, "My derailleur!"

                                "Shit!" responded Geminiani loud enough for a passing race official to hear. "He's broken his derailleur!"

                                The mechanic leaped from the car, spare bike in hand. As he handed the new bike to Jacques, the mechanic produced a pair of wire cutters and
                                snipped the cable on the side away from the judge. The judge saw nothing and Anquetil was pushed on his way."

                                Comment

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