Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Start lists coming up

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: Start lists coming up

    >>Second, how would the situation you describe represent a big accomplishment? All you have to do is put someone on the plane, drive them to the stadium and let them run. This is basically what the countries that benefit from the "one athlete" rule do (like the man who ran an 11.47 100 in the 2000 Olympics). Just because Iraq and Afghanistan have recently emerged from (or are still in) military conflict, the princple remains the same. If Iraq and Afghanistan are able to turn themselves into stable democracies, THAT will be an accomplishment.<<

    This is such a myopic view. It is not that simple. I remember, in 1984 when Nawal El Moutwakel (sp?) won the 400mH gold in LA, there was big uproar in Morrocco about her wearing shorts in front of men/public. In 1997, when Nezha won the WC gold, she was given huge reception when she went back. It takes courage to be the first one and THAT is an Accomplishment.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Start lists coming up

      there was a guy by the name of muhammed al maki from oman who competed in the 84 olympics i think he ran something over 50 seconds, but he was noticed by a coach by the name of tudor bidder who trained the young man for the next 4 years and he went on tho make the 88 olympic final and run 44.6 i think he also won a world cup and a few other big races in europe. So i think although u have a piont there is a lot of untapped potential out there that with the right training and resources that some lucky countries take for granted we have some potential stars among some of these people. And i also think that no one has the right to tell people they cant compete at these meets if iaaf make the rules as the were going to have the 4 rounds etc etc and these guys are not gouing affect the outcome in any way shape or form so i think u are being a bit harsh.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Start lists coming up

        "We in the US take a lot of things for granted because this is a rich country(hence the silver spoon comment"

        Please don't go there. Just because the USA wields a lot of economic power around the world, does NOT mean we are all rich snobs. Speak for yourself next time.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Start lists coming up

          >If a woman athlete from Afganistan or Iraq,
          >represents their country in the WC and runs 14.0
          >- I think it is a MUCH BIGGER accomplishment than
          >a US athlete winning the gold.

          Imagine a
          >woman from that kind of background making it to
          >the WC- But people born with a silver spoon in
          >their mouth wouldn't understand!!



          AMERICAN RUNNERS ARE BORN WITH SILVER SPOONS IN THEIR MOUTHS? TRULY, THIS MAN IS AN ASSHOLE!

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Start lists coming up

            >Noticed a couple of things here:
            1) Letitia
            >Vriesde is listed as starting in heat 5 of the
            >womens's 800. I thought the 5-gallons of coffee
            >scandal would have kept her out.

            Her caffeine positive at pan ams equals only a public warning and her pan am time gets thrown out

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Start lists coming up

              "If a woman athlete from Afganistan or Iraq, represents their country in the WC and runs 14.0 - I think it is a MUCH BIGGER accomplishment than a US athlete winning the gold."

              I would consider it a tremendous accomplishment if a woman athlete from Afganistan or Iraq decided she wanted to be a runner, trained hard, and qualified for the WC's based on this hard work -- most likely without the backing of her countrymen and women. If this woman, without the support a woman would receive in the US, becomes an elite sprinter and forces her government to recognize her abilities and grants her the rights and priveleges she deserves, then she has made a great contribution to the way of life for other women in her country.

              On the other hand, a woman athlete from Afganistan or Iraq who runs a 14.0 isn't going to make as big an impact on women's rights. Did she win a competition to represent her country? Is her 14.0 in the 100m comparitively better than another woman's marks in another event? I would guess (I could be wrong) that this woman was not chosen to represent her country because she is the best athlete. In Afgahnistan or Iraq, where women basically have no rights, a woman in the WC is probably nothing more than a ploy by the government to "prove" to the world that they're trying hard to improve women's rights.

              Having said that, I don't see how the "One athlete per nation rule" at the WC's is going to make the world a better place for all.

              Just my opinion,
              Chris

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Start lists coming up

                spvxv0, a few comments on some of your responses...

                "They are not replacing anyone on the start list, are they?"

                No. They're not replacing anyone on the start list. That's not the point. Instead, the point is that it that under the current rules, the world's 4th best athlete in an event could be left behind because the top 3 are also from his country. It's kind of like the situation where a college runner doesn't make nationals because of the way the regionals were stacked up. We all love the NCAA regionals, don't we?

                "Imagine a woman from that kind of background making it to the WC- But people born with a silver spoon in their mouth wouldn't understand!!"

                If you're saying that implementing the new qualifying rules will benefit the US more than any other nation, you're mistaken. In a few events, we may gain an athlete or two. On the other hand, we would probably be completely shut out in many more. Suppose the qualifying standards are set to allow for 32 athletes per event. Is there currently an American in the top 32 in the 1500? Javelin? Hammer? Etc... If anything, the US would qualify fewer athletes.

                "I remember, in 1984 when Nawal El Moutwakel (sp?) won the 400mH gold in LA, there was big uproar in Morrocco about her wearing shorts in front of men/public. In 1997, when Nezha won the WC gold, she was given huge reception when she went back. It takes courage to be the first one and THAT is an Accomplishment."

                While these are great stories and their achievements probably opened many doors that were once closed to women in Morocco, they were world-class athletes when they competed. They surely would have quaified on their own merit.

                Last thing, then I'll shut up...

                I can see the "one athlete per nation" rule applying in the Olympics. It seems more natural to think of the Olympics as an arena to promote many of the points you've made in previous posts. Isn't it everyone's dream to represent their country at the Olympics? But, the WC? I just believe that it should be limited to the world's best.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Start lists coming up

                  I just believe that it should be limited to the world's best>>>

                  I AGREE. too many heats and rounds making the meet last 9 days, perhaps 3 days too long. drop a round in each event by making the standards tougher.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Start lists coming up

                    http://www.iaaf.org/WCH03/news/Kind=2/newsId=22440.html

                    Just the point I was making. Some would argue, it is political, but it is a big step for Afgan women!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Start lists coming up

                      spvxv0, I read the story on the Afghan woman. Very interesting.

                      After reading the story and reflecting a bit, I'll soften my stance on the "one athlete per nation" rule. I still don't agree 100% with it, but it is clear the IAAF has an desire and obligation to promote track and field as world-wide, inclusive sport.

                      However, I also believe they have an obligation to promote a world championship that includes ALL of the world's best athletes. I believe there are ways to accomplish this that will appease most, if not all, parties. I don't claim to have the perfect solution, but I have ideas. Am I a major player in the world of T&F? Absolutely not, but I am a huge fan of the sport and I want to see the best athletes compete against each other. Can I alone make a difference? Only if I stop by the USATF office someday on my way to work and Craig Masback is so impressed by my ideas that he makes it his life's goal to lobby the IAAF on my behalf. But, if the ideas are out there, perhaps someone with the power will step up the line.

                      These are simply my personal opinions on this matter. If others agree with me, great! If not, that's fine, too.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Start lists coming up

                        This is exactly why we're going to see more and more athletes hoping from country to country because of this whole 3 athletes per country bs. If I was the 4th or 5th fastest Kenyan or Ethiopian 5000m runner I sure as heck would be looking to get some citizenship somewhere where I could get into the World Champs or Olympics, especially if it's a place like Qatar that's willing to pay for top athletes. The IAAF has a lot of work ahead of itself to keep the World Championships and Olympics (so does the IOC) from becoming like professional sports in the US where the countries willing to spend the money to recruit top athletes end up dominating while others are left with their one token athlete or worse yet countries like Kenya will be left as just a breeding ground producing quality distance runners year after year for other countries to buy. This is the way things are headed so long as the IAAF and the IOC continue down the touchy feely path of everyone gets to participate.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Start lists coming up

                          you are right recruiting is becoming much more prevalent for countries, no surprise though, recruiting is done among high schools, and even little league. I asked a college coach what is the most important part of having a successful program? and he said recruiting. another incentive for the athlete to change countries is sometimes the country(like the US) has prize money for the top american runners or whatever country. so lets say your a kenyan runner who has bests of 13.10 and 27.30 you can become an american citizen and get prize money for being one of the top americans in a race, plus overall prize money. or you can stay in kenya and be just a prospect. stephen cherono said in an article today his change of countries to qatar will guarantee him money for life, he will still live in kenya 10 months a year, and he does not like his new name, they just gave it to him.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X