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What happens to T&F if the Avian Flu hits?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by DrJay
    From dictionary.com:

    vac┬Ěcine ( P ) Pronunciation Key (vk-sn, vksn)
    Would you like to buy a vowel?

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    • #17
      I have responded to this post rather sardonically, but I urge people to read the article at the URL below:

      http://www.tompaine.com/articles/200510 ... _blues.php

      As far as track and field is concerned all bets are off, as well as other sports as the world deals with this pandemic if it does occurr.

      I take life one day at a time so I'm not worried about bird flu, as long it stays confined to birds, that's OK with me, but once its starts killing off a significant portion of the population, then that's another story.

      It may be more of a blow to Kentucky Fried Chicken and McNuggets if it hits America.

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      • #18
        My gut feeling is that the human race is in big trouble this time, and the worse-case scenario is going to happen. Will athletes be more vunerable to catching - or fighting - the virus, with heavy training weakening their natural immune defences?

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        • #19
          How, pray tell, does heavy training weaken one's natural immune defenses?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by gh
            How, pray tell, does heavy training weaken one's natural immune defenses?
            Assuming one works to 'failure', heavy training leaves one (immediately after the workout) with diminished resources to fight infection. After recovery, of course, the body is BETTER equipped to fight disease than if one hadn't trained (at least this the way the whole thing was explained to me to at USATF coaching clinics).

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            • #21
              Originally posted by tafnut
              Originally posted by gh
              How, pray tell, does heavy training weaken one's natural immune defenses?
              Assuming one works to 'failure', heavy training leaves one (immediately after the workout) with diminished resources to fight infection.
              I remember Coe was always picking up viral infections.

              With regard to the 1918 pandemic and the "we could be in big trouble this time" thoughts, we should remember that most people died from secondary bacterial infections. The 1957 "asian flu" infected more but killed less due to antibiotics preventing many deaths. Now we also have early warnings in place with WHO acting very fast, as seen with SARS, as well as vaccine for the most susceptible (old and young).

              We will be in big trouble when more infectious bacteria become resistent to antibiotics.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Daisy
                We will be in big trouble when more infectious bacteria become resistent to antibiotics.
                Additionally, there is much more chance for the virus to take hold when the bird flu - currently traveling west - hits Africa. These countries are, for the most part, much more strapped for resources to deal with this kind of problem than even Vietnam.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by tafnut
                  Assuming one works to 'failure', heavy training leaves one (immediately after the workout) with diminished resources to fight infection. After recovery, of course, the body is BETTER equipped to fight disease than if one hadn't trained (at least this the way the whole thing was explained to me to at USATF coaching clinics).
                  Unless it was an immunologist or the like who made the statement, I wouldn't place a lot of stock in it. Sounds like pseudo-science to me.

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                  • #24
                    I thought it was pretty well accepted that heavy training leaves athletes open to catching "things". I remember Brendan Foster saying something along the same lines. And I know, on a personal level, that I caught some horrendous colds just after some particular hard, energy sapping, distance races.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by gh
                      Unless it was an immunologist or the like who made the statement, I wouldn't place a lot of stock in it. Sounds like pseudo-science to me.
                      I searched for recent articles by Mike Gleeson:
                      http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/sses ... ff/mg.html

                      He seems to have done some legitimate research in this area.

                      1: Gleeson M, Pyne DB, McDonald WA, Bowe SJ, Clancy RL, Fricker PA.
                      In-vivo cell mediated immunity in elite swimmers in response to training.
                      J Sci Med Sport. 2004 Mar;7(1):38-46.

                      2: Gleeson M, Nieman DC, Pedersen BK
                      Exercise, nutrition and immune function.
                      J Sports Sci. 2004 Jan;22(1):115-25. Review.

                      3: Gleeson M, Lancaster GI, Bishop NC
                      Nutritional strategies to minimise exercise-induced immunosuppression in athletes.
                      Can J Appl Physiol. 2001;26 Suppl:S23-35. Review.

                      4: Gleeson M, Bishop NC
                      Special feature for the Olympics: effects of exercise on the immune system: modification of immune responses to exercise by carbohydrate, glutamine and anti-oxidant supplements.
                      Immunol Cell Biol. 2000 Oct;78(5):554-61. Review.

                      5: Gleeson M, Pyne DB.
                      Special feature for the Olympics: effects of exercise on the immune system: exercise effects on mucosal immunity.
                      Immunol Cell Biol. 2000 Oct;78(5):536-44. Review.

                      6: Gleeson M.
                      The scientific basis of practical strategies to maintain immunocompetence in elite athletes.
                      Exerc Immunol Rev. 2000;6:75-101. Review.

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