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  • Stanford football stadium track?

    While watching UCLA at Stanford game, now on Fox Sports, I observe what appears to be a track around the grass football field. I presume this is where huge crowds attended the USA vs. USSR dual track meets 45+ years ago. I did not see lane markings characteristic of modern artificial-surface tracks. Are my elderly eyes deceiving me? Is that really a track, perhaps cinders, with great seating capacity for a major meet?

  • #2
    it's a synthetic track of 7 lanes (I think only like 40" each). It will be gone in a few months as they rebuild the Stanford stadium. It's the same track that in its cinder configuration hosted the '62 US/USSR (not to mention the '60 OT).

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    • #3
      and not a "legal" track....correct GH??

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      • #4
        GH wrote,"it's a synthetic track of 7 lanes. . . It will be gone in a few months as they rebuild the Stanford stadium."
        --------
        Rebuilding, after the current football season, suggests a great opportunity to create for USA its top track and field venue -- a national stadium meeting IAAF and Olympic specifications. It seems this should be a joint lobbying goal for Track & Field News, USATF, and U.S. Olympic Committee (working together as a team) with possible support from elected officials and perhaps some public funding.

        By the way, as tonight's UCLA-Stanford game progressed, Fox Sports began to provide higher and wider camera angles that showed the track's lane marking as well as that lovely grass infield needed for throwing events.

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        • #5
          I remember watching a rainy Stanford Inventational on T.V. back in 1993, on that SAME track. Yes! It is only seven lanes. It was very confusing when I used to run on the second turn to warm up. I would often run into another lane once I came back on the straight away. I am glad that I never had to run on that track when it counted.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by James Fields
            Rebuilding, after the current football season, suggests a great opportunity to create for USA its top track and field venue -- a national stadium meeting IAAF and Olympic specifications. It seems this should be a joint lobbying goal for Track & Field News, USATF, and U.S. Olympic Committee (working together as a team) with possible support from elected officials and perhaps some public funding.
            ZERO chance of that happening. Nobody in their right mind builds a modern football stadium and doesn't have the front row of seats as close to the field of play as possible. The athletic deparatment will be dancing in the streets at the thought of getting the damned track out of the way.

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            • #7
              I did a few laps on it each day the last time USATF Nats were there while warming up my athletes. It felt more like the velodrome at Carson, than a like an outdoor track should feel like, with the banking involved.

              If I was back in the good old days, when I was strictly a 400m guy, I would have loved it, but as a RWer, it felt a tad bit odd. It was pretty convenient for a warmup area for that meet and was also a good location to get physio done too. Too bad its gone and Stanford won't host another big meet until they get another warmup area of similar makeup.

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              • #8
                Stanford stadium and the Los Angeles Coliseum have both hosted some beautiful meets. Once Stanford plays their final football game this season, the track in their football stadium will be torn out and work will progress on their new football stadium. They will work 24 hours a day, seven days a week on it until it is completed sometime around July of 2006. So many fantastic memories from great meets in Stanford stadium and the Los Angeles Coliseum. Too bad.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by gh
                  Originally posted by James Fields
                  It seems this should be a joint lobbying goal for Track & Field News, USATF, and U.S. Olympic Committee (working together as a team) with possible support from elected officials and perhaps some public funding.
                  ZERO chance of that happening.
                  It's a shame, however, even Wembley didn't get a track in the end despite pressure for a track.

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                  • #10
                    I was watching a Euro football game a week or so ago; the commentators mentioned that the track around the pitch screwed up the atmoshere as the crowd were too far away. I suspect the trend here will be mirrored in new European stadiums in the near future.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by marknhj
                      I suspect the trend here will be mirrored in new European stadiums in the near future.
                      Unfortunately, everything that you hate about American sport eventually pulls the European scene down to the same level. The only good news is that it's taking longer than I had feared for track to begin to fail on the Continent.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by gh
                        The only good news is that it's taking longer than I had feared for track to begin to fail on the Continent.
                        Oh yay - good news for a change! The demise of track in Europe has been delayed for 10 years (now scheduled for dismantling in 2019) because the Euro-types hate the USA so much they are postponing their copycat destruction of athletics.

                        gh, you seriously gotta work on your bed-side manner - the patient has the sniffles and you're already signing the Death Warrant!

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                        • #13
                          10 years ago, they were saying the future was the flexible stadium with hydraulic movement of stands for different configurations which could include tracks. What happened?

                          Slide out the soccer pitch, slide in a track?
                          http://www.sportsvenue-technology.com/p ... uf_shalke/

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by El Toro
                            What happened?
                            Below is how they describe the track option for Wembley Stadium in London. It is the new home for English football. Its not impossible but it will probably be a once in a life time event. So the long and short of it is, NO track.

                            Text below quoted from:
                            http://www.sportsvenue-technology.com/projects/wembley/

                            The stadium will still feature a removable steel and concrete platform that will rise 6m above the football pitch to contain a 400m running track. This would take six months to bolt together and cost around £20 million, lowering capacity to 68,000 spectators and involving adding more seats at the back of the stadium or reconfiguring lower tiers.

                            Wembley will only host athletics for major events, so will only need a running track two or three times in its 50-year design life.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tafnut
                              gh, you seriously gotta work on your bed-side manner - the patient has the sniffles and you're already signing the Death Warrant!
                              European AA press release today

                              <<The European Athletic Association is carrying out a Europe wide survey of athletics and sports fans‚ attitudes to the sport through independent specialists, Sports Marketing Surveys.

                              The EAA Council and Congress have acknowledged that European Athletics currently faces many challenges, not least how to attract and retain fans. (BF mine)

                              In order to gather information about the attitudes towards the sport of current athletics fans and those interested in sport in general, the EAA has contracted Sports Marketing Surveys to carry out a survey on its behalf using its unique global sports fan panel ˆ Sporting Insights.

                              EAA President Hansjörg Wirz said: „Attracting more fans to athletics, particularly amongst young people, is an important priority for European Athletics. To assist us to do this, it is important that we gather data telling us what people do and don‚t like about our sport. We hope that the analysis of the results of the SMS survey will better enable the EAA and its member federations to develop strategies to increase interest in athletics.">>

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