Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

the Pre Chronicles

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by DoubleRBar View Post
    Sorry I got off topic, but I couldn't help but remember that Big Game story from about 120 years ago.
    No apologies necessary. That was an amazing piece of history I was not aware of. I pulled up this article that illustrates how not only have times changed, but journalism has also. I really like the old-fashioned style of reporting.

    https://www.sfweekly.com/news/sudden...tten-disaster/
    Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants

    Comment


    • #47
      Thanks for Big Game disaster info. I lived in that area most of my life and attended a dozen or so Big Games but never heard a word about this.

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by user4 View Post
        All I can think after watching that race umpteen times, is that he just ran a strategically flawed race. He ran countless turns early in the race on the outside shoulder while Viren was tucked away on the rail relaxing. He made a few big moves too many on that last mile that just took so much out of him. A more controlled and patient pace going into the last two laps and at a minimum he gets the bronze.
        On the other hand, there are others beside Prefontaine whose race appears "strategically flawed," like Puttemans and Stewart. Puttemans showed a week after the Olympics that he was capable of running WR (13.13), but somehow he managed to lose contact of medals in the Munich race. Stewart's late kick gave him the bronze, but it appears he had energy left and might have run better.

        If all participants (especially Puttemans) had run their best possible race, Prefontaine would not perhaps even have been fourth. Of course, nobody knows.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by Olli View Post

          On the other hand, there are others beside Prefontaine whose race appears "strategically flawed," like Puttemans and Stewart. Puttemans showed a week after the Olympics that he was capable of running WR (13.13), but somehow he managed to lose contact of medals in the Munich race. Stewart's late kick gave him the bronze, but it appears he had energy left and might have run better.

          If all participants (especially Puttemans) had run their best possible race, Prefontaine would not perhaps even have been fourth. Of course, nobody knows.
          My favorite non Pre example is the 2016 m1500. Iā€™m sure everyone in that race not named Centrowitz was beating their heads against the wall after that.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Olli View Post

            On the other hand, there are others beside Prefontaine whose race appears "strategically flawed," like Puttemans and Stewart. Puttemans showed a week after the Olympics that he was capable of running WR (13.13), but somehow he managed to lose contact of medals in the Munich race. Stewart's late kick gave him the bronze, but it appears he had energy left and might have run better.

            If all participants (especially Puttemans) had run their best possible race, Prefontaine would not perhaps even have been fourth. Of course, nobody knows.
            It's possible Puttemans was a bit pittered out from the 5 races run throughout the games. Granted Viren did the same but not everyone handles things equally well. Hasn't Stewart admitted he just let them get away on the last lap?

            Comment


            • #51
              5 races? You mean four?: heats and final for both 5,000m and 10,000m. Incidentally, Puttemans was the quickest of all in both heats, whereas Viren always tried to get to the final with the minimal effort, to save his energy there; perhaps that's relevant.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Olli View Post
                5 races? You mean four?: heats and final for both 5,000m and 10,000m. Incidentally, Puttemans was the quickest of all in both heats, whereas Viren always tried to get to the final with the minimal effort, to save his energy there; perhaps that's relevant.
                Viren had incredible race discipline, in the rounds and the final.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by Olli View Post
                  5 races? You mean four?: heats and final for both 5,000m and 10,000m. Incidentally, Puttemans was the quickest of all in both heats, whereas Viren always tried to get to the final with the minimal effort, to save his energy there; perhaps that's relevant.
                  For some reason I thought there were heats and semis of the 5000. Same principal. Puttemans just appeared to have no snap in the final.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    In his commentary during the Munich 5000, David Coleman made the interesting comment that Steve Prefontaine "is inexperienced enough in many ways not to know how good the others are."

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by NotDutra5 View Post

                      For some reason I thought there were heats and semis of the 5000.
                      There were no semis in the 5000.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by tandfman View Post
                        There were no semis in the 5000.
                        Right....as Olli pointed out.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Chicago View Post
                          In his commentary during the Munich 5000, David Coleman made the interesting comment that Steve Prefontaine "is inexperienced enough in many ways not to know how good the others are."
                          In the documentary Fire on the Track, Ian Stewart mentions that Prefontaine mentioned running a 4 minute mile at the end of the 5,000m but didn't realize that Stewart, Viren and others felt they could do the same.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Puttemans was famous for running better indoor than out, and underperforming at outdoor championships.
                            Pre was famous for performing better in the US than in Europe. This is being generous.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by NotDutra5 View Post

                              In the documentary Fire on the Track, Ian Stewart mentions that Prefontaine mentioned running a 4 minute mile at the end of the 5,000m but didn't realize that Stewart, Viren and others felt they could do the same.
                              So true. While Pre did not improve 6-8 seconds per year during the next 3 years (although his 13:23.8 early season in '75 portended sub-13:20 later on (had he lived), he would have absolutely been in the mix in '76. One never knows, but the race probably would not have unfolded as it did had Pre been there. Burned once, shame on him. Burned twice . . .
                              Last edited by bobguild76; 06-11-2020, 11:21 PM.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Bruce Kritzler View Post
                                Puttemans was famous for running better indoor than out, and underperforming at outdoor championships.
                                Pre was famous for performing better in the US than in Europe. This is being generous.
                                Did Prefontaine perform better in the US than in Europe or was there simply better competition in Europe? I think his fastest races were run in Europe while he had little competition in the US.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X