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  • #91
    Originally posted by Retread View Post
    Some posters seem to think TF athletes are pampered . I think very few are. Most have several balls to juggle from time to time: financial constraints, injuries, travel complications, training time demands, weather restrictions, COVID, family responsibilities, drug testing etc. Put yourselves in their shoes. (no pun intended!) I am surprised by the volume of testing they can be subjected to deal with! Seems like overkill. Do all countries do this? One would think that Coleman might be given a little leeway since he had 11 good tests in 2019. I admittedly know very little about drugs. My competitive era was long before drugs were a factor.
    Most grown adults have these constraints except apparently gm who says he has none.
    So why should track athletes be allowed not to do their job especially when the integrity of the sport is at stake?

    Again I have no problem if a person misses a test with a legitimate reason. The issue I have is that athletes are allowed to miss 3 tests for NO Reason
    By allowing the to miss a test, you give them an opportunity to take PEDs, wait until the drugs cycle out of their blood, then only take the test when the drug has become undetectable. It kinda defeats the purpose of out of competition testing.

    Also by allowing an athlete to skip a test even after they said they were available during that 1 hour window, you are wasting money. Which is funny since WADA and AIU always claim to be too broke to do enough testing.

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    • #92
      Originally posted by Atticus View Post
      ??!!
      She doesn't get to pick which 11 days those are, does she? They do. So, yeah, she on 24/7/365, minus sleep (and they only give her 6 hours there).
      As far as I am concerned, most days are free days.

      Take myself for example. I sometimes have to leave work and go pick up one of my children from school due to sickness or other reasons. This happens about 5 times a year. But like you said , I don't get to pick which day. It can happen on any day of the 365. However it would be nonsensical for me to suggest that I am inconvenienced by this 365 days a year, just because I don't get to pick which day

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      • #93
        Originally posted by mungo man View Post
        However it would be nonsensical for me to suggest that I am inconvenienced by this 365 days a year, just because I don't get to pick which day
        If I had to tell someone my whereabouts every day of the year, and, if I changed my plans, I had to tell them that, AND then be able to meet them when THEY said I did, yeah, that would be HIGHLY inconvenient.
        That said, if I could make a decent living as a track athlete, I would see it as part of the agreement.
        I'm sure I mentioned this before, but I got to talk with Christian Taylor about this and he felt the same way - it was a huge pain in the butt, but he had agreed to it, so it's just part of being an elite T&F athlete.

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        • #94
          Originally posted by mungo man View Post

          As far as I am concerned, most days are free days.

          Take myself for example. I sometimes have to leave work and go pick up one of my children from school due to sickness or other reasons. This happens about 5 times a year. But like you said , I don't get to pick which day. It can happen on any day of the 365. However it would be nonsensical for me to suggest that I am inconvenienced by this 365 days a year, just because I don't get to pick which day
          somehow I doubt your kids go to school 365 days a year

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          • #95
            Originally posted by mungo man View Post

            Most grown adults have these constraints except apparently gm who says he has none.

            No, you said (and I quote) -- "Every adult has something that is a massive intrusion on their lives."

            I don't have any massive intrusions.

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            • #96
              And it was a strong assumption that a job, school and/or taking care of elderly are considered massive intrusions by everyone anyway.

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              • #97
                Originally posted by gh View Post

                somehow I doubt your kids go to school 365 days a year
                Thank you for making my point. Thats why I said it would be the height of nonsense to day I am being inconvenienced 365 days a year.
                Not only do my kids go to school for perhaps only 240 days but only on 5 days am I inconvenienced by having to pick them up.
                Thats why this notion of 24-7-365 is deson't make sense.
                Again thanks for making my point
                Last edited by mungo man; 11-20-2020, 11:36 PM.

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                • #98
                  Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                  If I had to tell someone my whereabouts every day of the year, and, if I changed my plans, I had to tell them that, AND then be able to meet them when THEY said I did, yeah, that would be HIGHLY inconvenient.
                  That said, if I could make a decent living as a track athlete, I would see it as part of the agreement.
                  I'm sure I mentioned this before, but I got to talk with Christian Taylor about this and he felt the same way - it was a huge pain in the butt, but he had agreed to it, so it's just part of being an elite T&F athlete.
                  Given the bolded part, why are we still debating this? Why are we still complaining that whereabouts are inconvenient

                  Christian Taylor apparently said what I have been saying all along which is "It is part of their job"
                  There are people whose jobs are far more inconvenient. Imagine being an army recruit: Sleep 4 to 6 hours a day, cant see your family, cant go home, no hanging out with friends for a drink, no privacy (you sleep in a room full of bunk beds), work 24 hour shifts, all your movements are controlled ............
                  And that is before you get shipped off to go fight.

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                  • #99
                    My take: Allowing an athlete to skip a test when the drugs are still cycling through their system is like a cop allowing a drunk driver not take a field sobriety test until the next day when they are sober.

                    The whole idea behind Out of competition testing is supposed to be the surprise factor, especially since we know from anonymous surveys that 40 to 60% of elite athletes admitted to doping. Which means the actual number is likely 50 to 70%

                    https://link.springer.com/article/10...279-017-0765-4

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                    • Originally posted by mungo man View Post
                      Given the bolded part, why are we still debating this? Why are we still complaining that whereabouts are inconvenient
                      Precisely because it IS so intrusive. The drug-testers should be the ones bending over backward to accommodate athletes as much as possible. That doesn't seem to be the case in many instances.

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                      • Can I check what you mean by “accommodate athletes as much as possible”? It could be taken a few ways...

                        I also think comparing with other sports is pointless - this is the system for athletes. Compare with other athletes - Emma Corburn, Christian Taylor, Dai Greene etc have all been clear it’s their job and they do it or face consequences. If people think the system is broken, suggest ways to fix it for the future, but current athletes can’t use it as a defence, as they know the current rules.

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                        • Originally posted by jjimbojames View Post
                          Can I check what you mean by “accommodate athletes as much as possible”? It could be taken a few ways...
                          Yeah, Russia certainly accommodated their athletes.

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                          • Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                            Precisely because it IS so intrusive. The drug-testers should be the ones bending over backward to accommodate athletes as much as possible. That doesn't seem to be the case in many instances.
                            Come on Atticus. There is nothing difficult or hard in the "be where you said you would be" regime.

                            Being allowed 2 misses before being banned is what I call a "bending over backwards" regime.

                            Given a lucky letoff last year on a technicality, and given he is a proven liar this year, Coleman got exactly what he deserved.

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                            • I know we've been over this before, but does anyone else on here follow Salwa on Instagram? She continues to bemuse and bewilder me with her story updates, either in a nightclub, getting ready to go to a nightclub, or general run-of-the-mill young people things. I do genuinely wonder how much training she is doing at the moment, as judging by her stories you would think very little. This really does not look like the right preparation for someone hoping to win an Olympic title.

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                              • Originally posted by El Toro View Post

                                Yeah, Russia certainly accommodated their athletes.
                                The shocking behaviour of the Russians is irrelevant. Two wrongs dont make a right.

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