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  • The meet is ending with a bang.

    Jye Edwards upsets McSweyn with an OQ.

    Comment


    • Following the Australian marks in the last year or two, it seems to me that we are in a revival of Australian T&F.
      Can one of you summaries the Aussie qualified athletes and whether my above impression is correct?

      Comment


      • Originally posted by olorin View Post
        Can one of you summaries the Aussie qualified athletes and whether my above impression is correct?
        The athletes who had beaten Tokyo standards before the Nationals are listed:

        https://cdn.revolutionise.com.au/cup...sxhpj14lbo.pdf and https://cdn.revolutionise.com.au/cup...ogfytw0qcg.pdf

        Some others like Edwards in the 1500 will be added to the lists.

        Still plenty of events without any athletes but there will be some in those events who get to Tokyo via world rankings or drop-down positions.

        Comment


        • Another one to be added to the Tokyo list is Brooke Stratton who reached a SB of 6.84m to take the LJ.

          Comment


          • MSP

            Damian Birkenhead (19.50m) slams the door shut in Alexander Kolesnikoff's face, reversing the placings at the Melbourne Track Classic where Kolesnikoff triumphed with a new PB of 19.84.

            Birkenhead stays a metre down from his best standards but Kolesnikoff should be very happy with his season. He had never thrown 19m with the senior implement before this year and 5/6 competitions have exceded 19m with the other one at 18.97, which was better than his pre-2021 best.

            MPV

            Kurtis Marschall fails to make his opening height of 5.50! Jack Downey (b.'01) of South Australia won in his absence with a modest 5.40, although this is only 5cm down on his PB set earlier this year. Not much else to say about the minor places.

            W200

            After Bree Masters in last night's 100m demonstrated a relatively poor start but excellent top speed and speed endurance, I was looking forward to seeing her in the 200m today. Alas, she did not run in the preliminaries. Nobody else inspires any interest from me.

            Final
            ...and so it proves.

            M200

            Heats

            Alex Beck, the winner in last night's 400m rant his heat in 20.84 +1.2, a new PB replacing his 21.09 +1.2 at QSAC just before Christmas last yer. as well as his all conditions best of 20.87 NWI, also at QSAC in early December last year. He was the only runner under 21, although Abdoulie Asim of New South Wales ran a very healthy 21.00 -1.5.

            Final

            Beck backs up his heat performance to win in 20.88 +0.4 after hot contender Abdoulie Asim gets a DQ. This is Beck's first medal at 200m. He was followed by soccer convert and first time medallist, Dhruv Rodrigues-Chico 20.90, who was just slower than his PB of 20.85 -0.9 set at Lakeside Stadium at the end of February. Joshua Azzopardi with 20.92, also a first medall, rounded out the only three under 21 seconds. Azzopardi was also just behind his PB of 20.90 +1.0 set at QSAC in March.


            W100H

            Liz Clay can't seem to run slower than 13s nowadays, winning her heat in 12.96 in still wind. However, Hannah Jones in the other heat also ran under 13 with the slightly faster time of 12.94 although with a helpful +1.1 wind. Abbie Tadeo (13.07) seems the likely hurdler to round out the medals. Jenneke qualified for the final with 13.40 but only two athletes in the final ran slower than that in the heats.

            Final

            The wind turned around for the final measuring -0.5 on the gauge. Liz Clay was the only one strong enough to handle this and run under 13. Former? heptathlete Celeste Mucci finished only one hundreth behind third. Jenneke finished back in 6th as expected.

            1 Liz Clay 12.97
            2 Hannah Jones 13.09
            3 Abbie Taddeo 13.18


            Comment


            • WDT

              Dani Stevens reigned supreme again with a 62.74 and two other 60m throws. She's a long way down on her bests but consistent distances in sequential competitions without breaking down indicates there's plenty of room to improve.

              Taryn Gollshewsky in second, triumphed over her nemesis this season, Jade Lally (GBR) winning with 61.05 to 60.36m. That distance is a new PB for Gollshewsky, topping her 60.27 thrown in Perth way back in September 2016 and marking only her third competition over 60m.

              This was Lally's first throw over 60m this season and her first 60m competition since the Sydney Invitational back in 2017. Like Gollshewsky, Lally's PB of 65.10 dates back to 2016.

              WSC

              Only six runners under 10 minutes and even the winner Genevieve Gregson, the National and Area record holder in this event (9:14.28) did not run under 9:30, although her time was 20+ seconds better than her first and only run in this event this year at the Brisbane Track Classic. Today's time was also faster than any that she ran last year and shows promise for further improvement in a fast race later in the year.

              Genevieve Gregson 9:36.85
              Cara Feain-Ryan 9:38.39
              Paige Campbell 9:46.72

              MTJ

              Shemaiah James won with his first jump of 16.28 with no wind
              Connor Murphy, the aforementioned son of Andrew Murphy, took second place with a new PB of 16.22 -0.3, also in his first jump and Julian Konle took bronze with 16.11 +0.6 on his third effort. None of the jumpers exceeded 16m on any other of their jumps.

              Still, this is the first time the three medallists all broke 16m since the 2006 championships when Connor's father, Andrew won with 16.66 (+1.6) from Michael Perry 16.44 (+1.2) and Jacob McReynolds 16.43 (+0.2). I will note that this feat was first achieved way back in the 1975 Champs by Mick McGrath (16.49), Ian Campbell (16.06) and Phil May (16.05).

              WJT

              As Atticus noted above, this event had all three medallists over 60m. Katherine Mitchell won with her first throw and Mackenzie Little's bronze was also secured by her initial effort. Kelsey-Lee Barber hit her peak on throw 5. Distances and number of other throws over 60m in their comp:

              Kathryn Mitchell 63.34m (2)
              Kelsey-Lee Barber 61.09m (2)
              Mackenzie Little 60.90m (1)

              This is the first time three over 60m has ever been achieved at the national championships!

              Previously, the best has been two throwers over 60m, which has happened only four times by a rollcall of WJT elite in AUS:

              1980 Pam MATTHEWS 61.86m, Petra RIVERS 60.86m
              1994 Joanna STONE 62.40m , Louise CURREY 61.44m
              2018 Kathryn MITCHELL 65.51m, Kelsey-Lee BARBER 62.21m
              2019 Kelsey-Lee BARBER 63.33m, Kathryn MITCHELL 62.78m
              2021 Kathryn Mitchell 63.34m, Kelsey-Lee Barber 61.09m, Mackenzie Little 60.90m

              Comment


              • W800

                In the absence of many potential contenders, it was obvious Catriona Bisset was in the box seat and so it proved with her winning in 2:00.45, over a second clear of the youngster Claudia Hollingsworth with 2:01.75 followed by Tess Kirsopp-Cole with 2:03.85.

                Hollingsworth (b.2005) should be very happy with her time running her second fastest time ever behind her PB of 2:01.60 set at the Brisbane Track Classic earlier this year. For somebody who started the year with a PB of 2:05.75 she has improved mightily, even running faster than that to win her heat two days ago.

                Kirsopp-Cole (b.1999) is a recent convert from 200/400 running and has improved on her PB of 2:19.15 set in 2018, her first year of 800 running, followed by no 800s in 2019 and 2020 to run this year 2:11.62, 2:11.96 (heat) and 2:06.72 (final), 2:03.00 PB and then finally, a 2:05.86 (heat) and 2:03.85 (final) at these championships.

                MLJ

                For an event which has promised so much the last couple of years, the domestic seasons have been disappointing proving that MLJ is probably held to a higher standard than some other events. Instead of numerous 8m jumps we have to make do with something like, "well there were 6 over 7.60..."

                1 Henry Frayne 7.97m (1.3)
                2 Zane Branco 7.80m (1.6)
                3 Christopher Mitrevski 7.79m (0.2)
                4 Jeremy Andrews 7.69m (-0.2)
                5 William Freyer 7.66m (-0.2)
                6 Joshua Cowley 7.63m (0.6)


                WLJ

                Brooke Stratton makes further progress towards being capable of being an OG finalist with a 6.84 +1.2, well ahead of the rest of the field. That's an OG auto Q by 2cm and is her best competition since the 2018 Brisbane Track Classic where she jumped 6.88 +1.9.

                M1500

                The OG selection puzzle becomes clearer with Jye Edwards winning in a OG auto Q time of 3:33.99, carving a chunk of his recent PB of 3:35.46 set on April Fool's day at Box Hill. His win and Q time guarantee his nomination. The fast time also gave a slap in the face to certain old fogeys who predicted a slow tactical race - you know who you are!

                The situation is still uncertain for the other two nominations but Stewart McSweyn shores up the argument for him by finishing second. McSweyn also has the necessary time and more importantly, the overall competitive record to take the second OG spot.

                Matthew Ramsden who opened with a slashing 3:34 earlier this year probably killed his chances completely by finishing back in 5th place.

                W400H

                Lauren Boden wins her 1,000th AUS title with 56.56 her second fastest time of the season. There is no way she will be able to get close to the Q time of 55.40, so she will be dependent on the rankings outcomes.

                M400H

                Christopher Douglas again dips under 50 for the third time in his life to win in 49.50, a new PB trimming a few tenths of his 49.70 set in Melbourne last month. Still a long way to go to run the Q of 48.90 but I still hold out hopes for that.

                WHJ

                Australia finally joins the 2m club with Nicola McDermott getting there ahead of Eleanor Patterson, the jumper most people thought would get there first after her 1.99 NR AR set in Wellington last year. However, Patterson only managed to jump once since Wellington, managing a modest 1.87 at the Brisbane Track Classic.

                Australia has been patiently waiting for this standard of jumper to emerge since this height was first cleared back in 1977 when Rosie Ackermann straddled it in Berlin.

                The first woman to clear 2.00m on Australian soil was Stefka Kostandinova when she won the 1985 World Cup. There was a 15 year drought until Kajsa Bergqvist cleared 2.00 in Brisbane in a pre-2000 Olympics competition.

                At the OG itself, the gold and silver medallists, Yelena Yelesina and Hestrie Cloete, upped the ante when both cleared 2.01, still the highest ever in Australia. Cloete also jumped 2.00 the following year in Brisbane.

                McDermott's series was very clean with only one miss prior to her 2m clearance. Full series:

                1.86m
                O
                1.90m
                O
                1.94m
                O
                1.97m
                O
                2.00m
                XO
                2.03m
                XXX

                Comment


                • Originally posted by El Toro View Post
                  Former? heptathlete Celeste Mucci finished only one hundreth behind third.
                  Mucci's decision to abandon the heptathlon doesn't look so wise in hindsight. She may have thought a hurdles spot & a place in our 4x100m team would been an easier way into international teams, but others have moved past her in both of these events. I hope she does return to it for Commonwealth Games as she sure has all-round talent.

                  Originally posted by El Toro View Post
                  W800

                  Kirsopp-Cole (b.1999) is a recent convert from 200/400 running and has improved on her PB of 2:19.15 set in 2018,
                  A place further back, 19 year old Rose Pittman set TWO PBs during the 800m event.

                  Her PB of 2-07.05 was set back in late 2017 when she had just turned 16 but she has never improved on it* until this weekend. Running 2-05.60 in her heat & 2-04.63 in the final, I hope there is further improvement to come next season.

                  *She did run 2-05.14 in a 2018 mixed race, but had never come close to that in a standard race.

                  Originally posted by El Toro View Post
                  M1500

                  The fast time also gave a slap in the face to certain old fogeys who predicted a slow tactical race - you know who you are!
                  A certain young Stewart McSweyn may well be regretting not following the old fogey's tactical prediction...

                  Comment


                  • Considering the WJT was the first Australian Championship to have three throwers 60m+, I pondered on how many countries even get three 60m throwers in a single year.

                    The results for the ten seasons 2011-2020 using WA data showing the number of season with at least three throwers, the maximum number of throwers in any season and the last season in which the threshold was reached:

                    Country Seasons Max Last
                    CHN 9 6 2020
                    GER 7 4 2018
                    LAT 7 4 2019
                    AUS 3 3 2018
                    JPN 3 4 2018
                    UKR 3 4 2014
                    CZE 2 3 2020
                    RUS 2 4 2015
                    USA 2 4 2016

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Vault-emort View Post
                      A certain young Stewart McSweyn may well be regretting not following the old fogey's tactical prediction...
                      I can't see McSweyn missing out, assuming he actually wants to run the 1500. He's already qualified for 1500/5000/10000 and he's not going to do all three.

                      If he is going to do the 1500, who's going to knock him out of selection? The first two times are the fastest ever run at nationals, they were both under the 3:35Q mark and beat all the local contenders, especially Ramsden who got beaten by non-Q athletes. That's the ultimate failure unless you were undergoing an appendix removal during the race...

                      The only really viable contender overseas is Oliver Hoare with his indoor Q time. Hoare's advantage is the fact he beat some very good competitors some of whom are likely to be at the OG themselves. If he backs that up in any way, he'd have to be a pick over Ramsden.

                      Unless something drastic happens soon, the three Qs not named Ramsden will the 1500 reps. If McSweyn pulls out, Ramsden is in the box seat.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by El Toro View Post

                        I can't see McSweyn missing out, assuming he actually wants to run the 1500. He's already qualified for 1500/5000/10000 and he's not going to do all three.
                        Oh yes, I didn't mean he would miss out. I just meant his pride may have taken a hit in not winning when he was supposed to be head & shoulders above the rest.

                        It will be very interesting to see what the other contenders do between now and Tokyo. I imagine the Bideau brigade, at least, will be on the circuit earning world ranking points while those who stay in Australia won't improve their ranking spots much.

                        Fot the Australian team, it might be beneficial if McSweyn pulled out of the 1500, but I doubt it. Since a 1500/5k double is just about impossible, will he try the rare 1500/10k combo?r

                        And yes, Matt Ramsden has done himself no favours with recent poor results.

                        Comment


                        • Story on Abdouli Asim:

                          https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/spo...18-p57k8k.html

                          and McDermott, McSweyn and Stevens + additonal athletes added to team:

                          https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/spo...18-p57k6w.html

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by El Toro View Post

                            WHJ

                            Australia finally joins the 2m club with Nicola McDermott getting there ahead of Eleanor Patterson, the jumper most people thought would get there first after her 1.99 NR AR set in Wellington last year. However, Patterson only managed to jump once since Wellington, managing a modest 1.87 at the Brisbane Track Classic.

                            Australia has been patiently waiting for this standard of jumper to emerge since this height was first cleared back in 1977 when Rosie Ackermann straddled it in Berlin.
                            Congrats to McDermott. The UK is one of the nations still awaiting it's first 2m woman.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Trickstat View Post

                              Congrats to McDermott. The UK is one of the nations still awaiting it's first 2m woman.
                              It's not a very common thing - only 22 nations have had a 2m jumper outdoors. Here's a list in temporal order:
                              Country First Last Seasons Jumps Jumpers
                              GER 1977 2017 17 58 8
                              ITA 1978 2018 7 13 3
                              RUS 1983 2019 28 117 13
                              USA 1983 2018 18 41 8
                              BUL 1984 2018 18 119 5
                              CUB 1985 1994 5 10 2
                              RSA 1985 2004 9 29 3
                              KAZ 1986 1988 2 3 1
                              UKR 1987 2020 17 59 8
                              SLO 1990 1990 1 1 1
                              SRB 1990 1990 1 1 1
                              BLR 1993 2019 2 2 2
                              GRE 1996 1996 1 1 1
                              NOR 1997 1997 1 2 1
                              ROU 1998 2000 8 13 2
                              CZE 2000 2000 1 1 1
                              SWE 2000 2010 8 37 2
                              HUN 2001 2001 1 1 1
                              CRO 2003 2015 11 77 1
                              ESP 2003 2015 8 10 1
                              BEL 2006 2019 4 9 2
                              AUS 2021 2021 1 1 1
                              Source: www.alltime-athletics.com , legal jumps, outdoors, FRG,GDR&GER added together as GER.



                              Comment


                              • I wonder if it will be another 15 years until a new country joins this club??

                                Comment

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