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Madrid WIT (Holloway 7.32 =AR heat; 7.29 WR, AR)

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  • #16
    Originally posted by ATK View Post
    Merritt took the 110mH record down ALOT when he broke it in 2012. I think Holloway can do the same damage to Merritt's mark. I'm still curious what Daniel Roberts can do though. He looked like a clear medal threat in Doha despite the DQ.
    Is there any doubt that he is also the fastest in the world indoors at the 60 (noH)?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Atticus View Post
      Is there any doubt that he is also the fastest in the world indoors at the 60 (noH)?
      If he ran a one off, maybe. But in a race with Bromell or Baker right now? I'm not betting on Holloway.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ATK View Post
        If he ran a one off, maybe. But in a race with Bromell or Baker right now? I'm not betting on Holloway.
        I think the reverse would be true. The more they race, the more GH would win.

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        • #19
          OOOO Barega had a BIG bear jump on his back!

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          • #20
            Strange pacing for that Women's 3000 WR attempt - the first 4 laps in 2:08 (that's 8:00 pace !), just as what was apparently requested by Tsegay.

            I suppose it was an echo of the very fast first 400 in her 1500 WR and that worked for her then, but using a similar strategy for double the distance at altitude was always going to be folly.

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            • #21
              Barega and Tsegay apparently disregarded the altitude issue, and both paid a big price. Also, Tsegay and Hailu had to pass three lapped runners, who did not move out. There were a couple of 400s at 70s, leading to a 2:53+ middle kilo. I thought Hailu was going to challenge her, but Tsegay ran away over the last 400 in about 62. Barega barely broke 60 for his last 400, after passing the rabbit at 600 and forging ahead to ~2:21 at the kilo. Big comethrough for Tori Franklin on last jump to edge Mamona and tie Povea on points for the tour.

              Much improved camera work on the round races, BTW.
              Cheers,
              Alan Shank
              Woodland, CA, USA

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              • #22
                Originally posted by gm View Post
                WORLD RECORD 7.29!
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8omN7pyirA

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                • #23
                  Didn't he go 7.35 to 7.32, heats to final, in one of his recent meets?

                  I was thinking after seeing 7.32 heat = 7.29 final and HE DID IT! So happy for him.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Fortius19 View Post
                    Didn't he go 7.35 to 7.32, heats to final, in one of his recent meets?

                    I was thinking after seeing 7.32 heat = 7.29 final and HE DID IT! So happy for him.
                    At Levin he did 7.38 to 7.32

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                    • #25
                      Watched it yesterday, was great to see.

                      But whats with these faulty clocks during sprint hurdle world records? lol. First Keni Harrison now this. Takes away from the instant moment.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Weights&Shoes View Post
                        Watched it yesterday, was great to see.

                        But whats with these faulty clocks during sprint hurdle world records? lol. First Keni Harrison now this. Takes away from the instant moment.
                        There's nothing faulty.

                        The time that shows up instantly on the scoreboards is a "flash time", described here in a WA piece -- "For an even quicker idea of the winning time, check the timing display on the infield near the finish line. This delivers a "flash" time as the winner of each race breaks a light beam at the finish line. It's not the official time, because the light beam might have been broken by the winner's hand rather than the torso, but it is instant, and it's almost always within 0.01 or 0.02 of the official time."

                        The official time is produced after a read of the photofinish picture.

                        So, in short, the official time is never "adjusted" or "rounded up/down" as many commentators are wont to say.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Weights&Shoes View Post
                          Watched it yesterday, was great to see.

                          But whats with these faulty clocks during sprint hurdle world records? lol. First Keni Harrison now this. Takes away from the instant moment.
                          it's not a faulty clock: the first time taht comes up is an eyebeam that takes an instant reading when the first part of the body (not necessarily the torso, which is used for official times). Good timing crews usually have the eyebeam set so if anything it reads a 100th slower than what the real time would be.

                          If you think "taking away the moment" is a problem, think how distressed everyone would be to have the eyebeam report a WR and then have to tell the athlete and fans "oh, sorrry, our bad"

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by gh View Post
                            it's not a faulty clock: the first time taht comes up is an eyebeam that takes an instant reading when the first part of the body (not necessarily the torso, which is used for official times). Good timing crews usually have the eyebeam set so if anything it reads a 100th slower than what the real time would be.
                            Well, that answers MY question. A flash time will ALWAYS be faster since anything can break the eyebeam.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Atticus View Post

                              Well, that answers MY question. A flash time will ALWAYS be faster since anything can break the eyebeam.
                              The previous record holder Colin Jackson was the king of dipping under the beam.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Atticus View Post

                                Well, that answers MY question. A flash time will ALWAYS be faster since anything can break the eyebeam.
                                except that good timing crews set it up so it's usually the same or slower

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