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  • #31
    Originally posted by Halfmiler2 View Post
    Even with NIL, I think scholarships should include $100 a month for incidental expenses.
    I don't know anything about current athletic scholarships but in 1952 we received $20/month for incidentals, which would be $203/month today. Of course, that was for a specified number of chores (sweeping basketball court at halftime keeping soap trays in showers stocked,)
    lonewolf
    Senior Member
    Last edited by lonewolf; 07-08-2021, 09:12 PM.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by lonewolf View Post

      I don't know anything about current athletic scholarships but in 1952 we received $20/month for incidentals, which would be $203/month today. Of course, that was for a specified number of chores (sweeping basketball court at halftime keeping soap trays in showers stocked,)
      Damn Lonewolf, all along you have been a professional, at least according to the universe of Avery Brundage.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Tuariki View Post

        Damn Lonewolf, all along you have been a professional, at least according to the universe of Avery Brundage.
        Not far off...Brundage in the 1950s wanted to ban athletes from the Olympics who took athletics scholarships.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Tuariki View Post
          Damn Lonewolf, all along you have been a professional, at least according to the universe of Avery Brundage.
          And, doping on uncastrated pork all my life.
          lonewolf
          Senior Member
          Last edited by lonewolf; 07-09-2021, 04:35 AM.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by lonewolf View Post

            I don't know anything about current athletic scholarships but in 1952 we received $20/month for incidentals, which would be $203/month today. Of course, that was for a specified number of chores (sweeping basketball court at halftime keeping soap trays in showers stocked,)
            When I ran for Penn as a walk-on in the early 1970s, my financial aid package which had nothing to do with Athletics included a work-study job that was worth about $500 for the year. I did about 10 hours of work a week for a professor doing odds and ends.

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            • #36
              I have a cousin who played basketball for Kentucky back in the 70's (when they still had JV ball). In lieu of a true scholarship, they paid him as a tutor dedicated to the main players, and let him live in Wildcat Lodge. He did get in one game for the Varsity, but failed to score.

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              • #37
                Even Students Who Aren’t Athletes Think The NCAA Is A Problem | FiveThirtyEight

                In the College Pulse survey, large majorities of college students were in favor of allowing student-athletes to be paid a salary (67 percent), receive education-related payments (75 percent), be paid to endorse products on social media (88 percent), profit off of their likeness (89 percent) and be paid to appear in ads (93 percent).

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                • #38
                  This might be a reflection of my age, but I was somewhat surprised to see that many of the athletes here in Alabama who are taking advantage of this are doing so in on-line venues. I had half-expected to see higher profile athletes hocking car dealerships (which may still occur). I was not aware that there were web sites which would allow you to have celebrities record personal audio or video recordings of themselves. For particularly popular athletes, that type of venture could require a lot of time investment, which has to come from somewhere.

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                  • #39
                    The NIL ruling just put more major cracks in the NCAA dam against athletes going pro and maintaining their eligibility.

                    SmartyStreets enters into NIL deal with all female athletes at BYU
                    Another big drop in the Name, Image and Likeness bucket has fallen in Provo, with address verification company SmartyStreets entering into a deal with all female student-athletes at BYU on Tuesday.
                    The deal was first reported by Garrett McClintock on Twitter and confirmed by BYU Athletics. The deal includes all walk-ons and the Cougarettes and will provide each athlete $6,000 annually.
                    What's to stop Nike from offering $100,000 to athletes to sign NIL agreements? That's certainly 'going pro'.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                      The NIL ruling just put more major cracks in the NCAA dam against athletes going pro and maintaining their eligibility.



                      What's to stop Nike from offering $100,000 to athletes to sign NIL agreements? That's certainly 'going pro'.
                      Why would a shoe company bother? The school is already under a shoe contract.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
                        Why would a shoe company bother? The school is already under a shoe contract.
                        Why did they sign Hocker?
                        Answer - to get him in their stable of athletes as 'influencers' / product endorsements.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                          Why did they sign Hocker?
                          Answer - to get him in their stable of athletes as 'influencers' / product endorsements.
                          I have no idea why they signed him. It could be another company wanted to pay him to go pro and Nike stepped in.

                          He had more appeal and influence running at Oregon.

                          For next year in Eugene I'm sure Nike wanted local star Hocker in Nike. But as far as influence goes Nike has already won the battle. My seat at Pre was near the start and it was funny seeing lots of non Nike people running in Nikes with the top all white. Of course Josh Kerr got 3rd in Tokyo running in white top Nikes.
                          Conor Dary
                          Senior Member
                          Last edited by Conor Dary; 09-26-2021, 05:18 PM.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
                            I have no idea why they signed him.
                            Which is beside my point. Now Nike can sign whomever they wish to exclusive NIL contracts. Voila! de facto pro.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                              The NIL ruling just put more major cracks in the NCAA dam against athletes going pro and maintaining their eligibility.



                              What's to stop Nike from offering $100,000 to athletes to sign NIL agreements? That's certainly 'going pro'.
                              Very few college athletes are worth paying $100,000 for a NIL agreement.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by 18.99s View Post
                                Very few college athletes are worth paying $100,000 for a NIL agreement.
                                Again, not my point.
                                BYU women are now sewn up in NIL deals. Why can't Nike do that for whomever they wish, at whatever the market asks ($100-$1,000,000?).
                                That is a 'professional' deal, yet they retain their scholarships. The thin line between amateur (NCAA athlete) and pro is being erased as we watch.

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