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Meuwly weighs in on the super spike debate: If you're Adidas or Asics, bad luck

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  • #16
    Originally posted by ATK View Post
    Those are just two examples out of the many names I listed.

    Grant Holloway is in 12.81 form. Switch spikes he's running 12.71 - 12.66?
    Erriyon Knighton is in 19.84 form. Switch spikes he's running 19.54?
    Shamire Little is in 52.39 form. Switch spikes and she's running 51.89 - 51.69?
    If they have the new super-spikes, they probably already used them when running the 12.81/ 19.84/ 52.39.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by 18.99s View Post

      If they have the new super-spikes, they probably already used them when running the 12.81/ 19.84/ 52.39.
      The article referenced in the original topic post notes Adidas athletes do not have "super-spikes". The athletes I named all run for Adidas.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ATK View Post
        The article referenced in the original topic post notes Adidas athletes do not have "super-spikes". The athletes I named all run for Adidas.
        Didn't Nike make some generic super-shoes for people in that situation? Not that adidas wouldn't fine/drop you for wearing them.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Atticus View Post
          Didn't Nike make some generic super-shoes for people in that situation? Not that adidas wouldn't fine/drop you for wearing them.
          What situation? Are you saying Holloway, Knighton and Litter were wearing Nike spikes when they recently set their PBs?

          I think at the 2020 US marathon trials Nike had free pairs of vapor flys (or next %? whatever the Kipchoge shoe was) for any athlete to use. But this article is talking about sprinters and hurdlers and Wiederganger noted improvement times for 100/200/400 in his original post.
          Last edited by ATK; 07-22-2021, 03:37 PM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by ATK View Post

            What situation? Are you saying Holloway, Knighton and Litter were wearing Nike spikes when they recently set their PBs?
            I don't know about the spikes, but some non-Nike athletes have been using Nikes in road races after taping or painting them to hide the Nike logo. It's possible some have done it with spikes, especially if Nike sells logo-less versions to them.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by 18.99s View Post

              I don't know about the spikes, but some non-Nike athletes have been using Nikes in road races after taping or painting them to hide the Nike logo. It's possible some have done it with spikes, especially if Nike sells logo-less versions to them.
              Yes I think your right about that. I updated my post, but Im just referring to the improvement times noted in the 100/200/400 as noted in the original post and Adidas/Asics disadvantage noted in the article. I have been hearing a lot about the road racing shoes before but I've paid less attention there.

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              • #22
                With big names signed to Adidas, I can't believe they've not developed super spikes. They had a whole year and smaller brands have managed so why not them? Holloway is fast enough, more speed might have inhibited him or messed with his technique in an Olympic year, but SMU hasn't broken 22 this year and Lyles in a better place but Bednerek is close behind.
                Last edited by Speedster; 07-22-2021, 09:14 PM.

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                • #23
                  I just ordered some Nike Maxfly "Super" spikes for myself. I'm entered in a Masters Decathlon Aug 11-12. I dont have natural "ankle stiffness", so I'm eager to try them out. I need all the help I can get.

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                  • #24
                    Hope that works out well for you, Fortius. Let us know what you think.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Speedster View Post
                      but SMU hasn't broken 22 this year
                      Note that Miller-Uibo ran 22.03 and 49.08 in April, her fastest 200 opener and her 2nd fastest 400m opener (49.05 in 2019) ever. She then got a slight injury and shut down her season until late June when she had to run her national trials. She also ran indoor personal bests in the 200/400m this year as well.

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                      • #26
                        Help me out here. Which labels are specifically the superspikes? Are they available to retail customers? Is there any custom fitting going on for the elites that might be as important to performance as the spike vs. the standard shoe?

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by ATK View Post
                          Those are just two examples out of the many names I listed.

                          Grant Holloway is in 12.81 form. Switch spikes he's running 12.71 - 12.66?
                          Erriyon Knighton is in 19.84 form. Switch spikes he's running 19.54?
                          Shamire Little is in 52.39 form. Switch spikes and she's running 51.89 - 51.69?

                          Sorry not convinced simply lacing up new spikes gives you that much advantage as is being implied. Sure the technology is improving, but I feel its being too over hyped while not enough credit is given to other factors that go into an athletes performance and success.

                          Even you have been hyping up Bol for a while. I didnt expect her to be this fast yet, but I'm sure its because various factors (factors you have noted over the months) not just her shoes and in reality she is just a 53.00 runner. Sydney ran 52.23 in Doha 2 years ago. Making a .33 improvement since then is not just because of the spikes she is wearing.
                          Reading this article brought out two interesting points for me:

                          https://www.theguardian.com/sport/20...ike-technology

                          First, it's kind of a weird position for an athlete. Who wants to run fast and have people think that it was really the spikes that led to the decrease time? At the same time, if you say that the spikes weren't that important you're really not supporting your shoe sponsor.

                          Second, Bolt thinking that it's "Weird and unfair" is strange to me, but not because the spikes don't work as advertised. It makes sense that improvements in spike technology would lead to improvements in sprint time. But that's always been the case. Usain Bolt running in his Pumas ran a 9.58. Put him in Carl Lewis's 1984 Nikes and he probably runs slower, and even slower in Bob Hayes's Tokyo Adidas and Jesse Owens's leather spikes. That's the nature of technological progress. Why should it stop now with these spikes?

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by ATK View Post

                            Note that Miller-Uibo ran 22.03 and 49.08 in April, her fastest 200 opener and her 2nd fastest 400m opener (49.05 in 2019) ever. She then got a slight injury and shut down her season until late June when she had to run her national trials. She also ran indoor personal bests in the 200/400m this year as well.
                            I had heard of the injury but wasn't aware of the impact and perhaps more of the reason to need a boost like some fancy spikes to get her closer to those ahead of her.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by steve View Post

                              First, it's kind of a weird position for an athlete. Who wants to run fast and have people think that it was really the spikes that led to the decrease time? At the same time, if you say that the spikes weren't that important you're really not supporting your shoe sponsor.

                              Second, Bolt thinking that it's "Weird and unfair" is strange to me, but not because the spikes don't work as advertised. It makes sense that improvements in spike technology would lead to improvements in sprint time. But that's always been the case. Usain Bolt running in his Pumas ran a 9.58. Put him in Carl Lewis's 1984 Nikes and he probably runs slower, and even slower in Bob Hayes's Tokyo Adidas and Jesse Owens's leather spikes. That's the nature of technological progress. Why should it stop now with these spikes?
                              I basically agree with both these points. The spikes are very important but they are not the only factor in an athletes improvement. And technology is always improving. Spikes, equipment, training methods, nutrition etc. I would hope things continue to progress and get better as years go by.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by steve View Post

                                Reading this article brought out two interesting points for me:

                                https://www.theguardian.com/sport/20...ike-technology

                                First, it's kind of a weird position for an athlete. Who wants to run fast and have people think that it was really the spikes that led to the decrease time? At the same time, if you say that the spikes weren't that important you're really not supporting your shoe sponsor.

                                Second, Bolt thinking that it's "Weird and unfair" is strange to me, but not because the spikes don't work as advertised. It makes sense that improvements in spike technology would lead to improvements in sprint time. But that's always been the case. Usain Bolt running in his Pumas ran a 9.58. Put him in Carl Lewis's 1984 Nikes and he probably runs slower, and even slower in Bob Hayes's Tokyo Adidas and Jesse Owens's leather spikes. That's the nature of technological progress. Why should it stop now with these spikes?
                                A big enough difference in degree is a difference in kind. Usually the improvement is lots of little bumps in an steadily increasing line, but the change to fiberglass poles was a sea change, even though it actually occurred over decades, the big jump was in the start as they learned how to make them. Here, we have a rather large bump rather than the incremental improvement. As with the vault, some athletes will gain more than others, and it will be this subset that sees the biggest improvement in the professional level of our sport.

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