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¶ 2021 wOG 800: Athing Mu (US) 1:55.21 (WL)

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  • booond
    replied
    Originally posted by TN1965 View Post
    I don't think there is a "winning strategy" for a front runner when there is someone faster in the field.
    Matt Centrowitz would like a word. So would Asbel Kiprop. Things happen.

    Goule, like everyone else, allowed Mu to run calmly at her pace as if upsetting her with a faster or slower pace would release Godzilla. They all lost because they were too afraid to try to win.

    Leave a comment:


  • Atticus
    replied
    For all of us (me!) who thought Mu might be vulnerable to a sudden kick at the end, she's now too far ahead to worry about that!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • TN1965
    replied
    I don't think there is a "winning strategy" for a front runner when there is someone faster in the field.

    If Goule had taken off at a faster pace, Mu could have easily followed her, and Goule would have had even less left for the final 100m. And what would have been the alternative? Sit behind other runners and try to outkick the "rest" in the home stretch? Well, that's what Rogers did to win the bronze. That's not a "winning" strategy. The only way you could win with that is if Mu either blows up or it tripped. And that was a more natural strategy for Rogers than for Goule.

    Leave a comment:


  • booond
    replied
    I do, but remembered that you are an LSU fanboy and there was no longer a reason to bang my head against that wall.

    I don't think there was a winning strategy other than to control the race/pace, which she ceded to Mu. She could've gone out faster or slowed it down. She did neither and hoped a sinkhole would swallow Mu. It didn't.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by booond View Post

    That's right, Goule ran at LSU.

    Goule's tactic was to outsprint the fastest runner in the field... smart.
    I thought you wanted to have a serious conversation about tactics as us track fans do during and after championships meets and you offer silly a non sequitur while still not offering your winning strategy for Goule because you and I both know it doesn't exist.

    Leave a comment:


  • CookyMonzta
    replied
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post

    I disagree. Goule's tactic was to sit on Mu's shoulder drafting and hope she had enough left in the tank to pass on the homestretch but she didn't have the legs to pull it off. Rogers, on the other hand, employed a losing strategy. Her strategy was more likely to medal than Goule's but less likely to win. No one was beating Mu, not Goule or anyone else. The best runner is the best runner.
    Maybe Goule thought the moment would overwhelm Mu once more, like it did at the 2019 NBIN, when she tried for sub-2:00 and paid for it, with Roisin Willis winning. I actually thought Goule would try to get alongside her and menace her all the way to the 550. But instead she tucked right behind her, because she had to know that wasn't going to work this time, and she wanted a medal.

    With two 19-year-olds 1-2, to be 22 come Paris 2024, this might have been 30-year-old Goule's last chance. And Rogers will still be in the picture at 28.

    Leave a comment:


  • CookyMonzta
    replied
    Originally posted by Trickstat View Post
    Thanks to 19 year old Keely Hodgkinson, the fear that GB would get no t&f medals at these Games has been put to rest.
    Almanza gone, Ajee's 2017-18 mojo having left the building a long time ago. It was a formality for one of those ladies to come up with a medal. I'd bet most didn't think it'd be the 19-year-old.

    Leave a comment:


  • booond
    replied
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post

    I disagree. Goule's tactic was to sit on Mu's shoulder drafting and hope she had enough left in the tank to pass on the homestretch but she didn't have the legs to pull it off. Rogers, on the other hand, employed a losing strategy. Her strategy was more likely to medal than Goule's but less likely to win.
    That's right, Goule ran at LSU.

    Goule's tactic was to outsprint the fastest runner in the field... smart.

    Rogers understood she couldn't win and used Mu to kill off the others while laying in the back. You can see on the final turn where she decides she'd be better off waiting than attempting to run around Wang. She wasn't going to beat either Mu or Keely (fantastic race by her but she may end up the Rai to Mu's Warholm) but she could emply her tactic by using her strength - kicking.

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  • Trickstat
    replied
    Thanks to 19 year old Keely Hodgkinson, the fear that GB would get no t&f medals at these Games has been put to rest.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by booond View Post

    I know she employed a losing tactic so attempting something else may not have won but would've been taking a shot at winning instead of watching the fastest runner in the race set a comfortable pace which set up a killer final 300.

    Goule's tactic was to lose or hope Mu tripped or collapsed. Not saying she could've won, saying she didn't try to win.
    I disagree. Goule's tactic was to sit on Mu's shoulder drafting and hope she had enough left in the tank to pass on the homestretch but she didn't have the legs to pull it off. Rogers, on the other hand, employed a losing strategy. Her strategy was more likely to medal than Goule's but less likely to win. No one was beating Mu, not Goule or anyone else. The best runner is the best runner.

    Leave a comment:


  • runningforpi
    replied
    Goule wasn’t going to beat Mu, but she could have at least managed her race better to ensure herself a medal.

    Leave a comment:


  • booond
    replied
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post

    I agree with you about Mu but what do you mean by Goule "not controlling her race"? Do you think Goule could have employed a winning tactic against Mu?
    I know she employed a losing tactic so attempting something else may not have won but would've been taking a shot at winning instead of watching the fastest runner in the race set a comfortable pace which set up a killer final 300.

    Goule's tactic was to lose or hope Mu tripped or collapsed. Not saying she could've won, saying she didn't try to win.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by booond View Post

    She ran the perfect race to win. Next she has to push it faster to see where her limits are.

    Goule made the mistake of not controlling her race. She allowed Mu to control it. Rogers did the opposite and gathered all the carcasses, save one, that Mu left behind.
    I agree with you about Mu but what do you mean by Goule "not controlling her race"? Do you think Goule could have employed a winning tactic against Mu?

    Leave a comment:


  • booond
    replied
    Originally posted by DrJay View Post

    I was thinking the same thing in the first 200-300. She's young, new on the international stage at this level. Job one was to secure the gold. Don't blow it. There will be time, plenty of time, to chase marks.
    She ran the perfect race to win. Next she has to push it faster to see where her limits are.

    Goule made the mistake of not controlling her race. She allowed Mu to control it. Rogers did the opposite and gathered all the carcasses, save one, that Mu left behind.

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    good analysis now posted to home page:

    WOMEN’S 800M: NEGATIVE SPLITS ALL THE WAY TO GOLD, SILVER AND BRONZE

    Leave a comment:

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