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body shaming at Oregon?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by scottmitchell74 View Post

    Not aggressively asking but really asking. How do you know? She's World Class already, but what if she was 1.3% fitter? Really being serious and curious here, not confrontational.
    https://www.eurosport.com/athletics/...34/story.shtml

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    • #17
      I've mentioned elsewhere I knew some elite female distance runners who got so thin, but running very well, they developed severe osteoporosis at 30....fortunately they recovered by putting on weight but their careers were never the same.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Dave View Post
        Just a question here. Isn’t excess weight always an impediment to optimum performance? In other ways, my coaches were always somewhat abusive in the late 60s and early 70s. This was all part of the deal. They pushed you hard to get better at your sport.

        Finally, aren’t the best women in world championships always thin?

        im not a fan of “body shaming” but is anyone able to really perform well with excess weights.
        Put the athletes through the training they're supposed to do, make sure they're not eating junk, and then let their weight and bodyfat fall where it may. Those who rise to the top of the elite ranks are those whose body composition naturally fall into the optimum range for their build and event as a result of proper training and reasonable eating.

        If an athlete has to struggle to keep their bodyfat down with hours on the stationary bike on top of their regular training, and/or they have to resort to restrictive diets that screw with their hormone levels and bone density and sleep patterns, they're not going to be successful at the highest level anyway.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by 18.99s View Post

          Put the athletes through the training they're supposed to do, make sure they're not eating junk, and then let their weight and bodyfat fall where it may. Those who rise to the top of the elite ranks are those whose body composition naturally fall into the optimum range for their build and event as a result of proper training and reasonable eating.

          If an athlete has to struggle to keep their bodyfat down with hours on the stationary bike on top of their regular training, and/or they have to resort to restrictive diets that screw with their hormone levels and bone density and sleep patterns, they're not going to be successful at the highest level anyway.
          I think that would be fine and dandy if scholarships weren't involved.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Dave View Post

            Finally, aren’t the best women in world championships always thin?
            Not necessarily. Elle Purrier is five foot three and weighs 120 and she's world class. As a farm girl she probably grew up on bacon and eggs. Koko five foot nine and weighs 106, Coburn 5 foot 8 and 119 but Purrier smoked both of them over the mile and 2 mile when she set the AR's.

            African runners eat the same food they ate as a child. They grow up on simple foods but no fried crap and keep everything natural to get all the nutrients.

            When you start changing diets from what you're used to eating that's where problems start.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post

              I think that would be fine and dandy if scholarships weren't involved.
              Coach is paid to get maximum performance. In distance running this can involve being as light as possible....certainly to some degree. Can lines be crossed in getting there? Certainly. This applies to men and women although perception wise not equally. Distance running by its nature can have some negative side affects of hard training down the road...though not with everyone. At a high end program such as Oregon, maybe this needs to be explained to the athletes prior to accepting a scholarship. I can't say I thought the letter sent took all of this into account.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by JMysterio View Post
                Not necessarily. Elle Purrier is five foot three and weighs 120 and she's world class. As a farm girl she probably grew up on bacon and eggs. Koko five foot nine and weighs 106, Coburn 5 foot 8 and 119 but Purrier smoked both of them over the mile and 2 mile when she set the AR's.

                African runners eat the same food they ate as a child. They grow up on simple foods but no fried crap and keep everything natural to get all the nutrients.

                When you start changing diets from what you're used to eating that's where problems start.
                Interesting that Purrier is brought up because, to me, she seems to have thinned out a bit once out of college.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by NotDutra5 View Post

                  Coach is paid to get maximum performance. In distance running this can involve being as light as possible....certainly to some degree. Can lines be crossed in getting there? Certainly. This applies to men and women although perception wise not equally. Distance running by its nature can have some negative side affects of hard training down the road...though not with everyone. At a high end program such as Oregon, maybe this needs to be explained to the athletes prior to accepting a scholarship. I can't say I thought the letter sent took all of this into account.
                  This isn't unique to Oregon by any means.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by JMysterio View Post
                    Not necessarily. Elle Purrier is five foot three and weighs 120 and she's world class. As a farm girl she probably grew up on bacon and eggs. Koko five foot nine and weighs 106, Coburn 5 foot 8 and 119 but Purrier smoked both of them over the mile and 2 mile when she set the AR's.

                    African runners eat the same food they ate as a child. They grow up on simple foods but no fried crap and keep everything natural to get all the nutrients.

                    When you start changing diets from what you're used to eating that's where problems start.
                    Right ...by all means the US should copy Ethiopia...

                    Malnutrition contributes to more than 50 percent of all infant and child deaths in Ethiopia. The damage caused by malnutrition during the first 1,000 days—from the start of a woman’s pregnancy to her child’s second birthday—is usually irreversible in terms of its negative impact on the child’s health, cognitive development, physical growth, and school and work performance later in life. In Ethiopia, the major causes of malnutrition are persistent food insecurity, poor maternal and child feeding practices, high incidence of infectious diseases, and limited access to quality nutrition services. Household wealth, education, and family planning are also key drivers of children’s nutrition. Twenty-seven percent of women in Ethiopia are thin or malnourished and 38 percent of children suffer from stunting. Ethiopia’s lowland pastoral areas and densely populated, food-insecure highland woredas (districts) suffer frequent droughts, complicating access to and consumption of nutritious foods.

                    https://www.usaid.gov/ethiopia/nutrition

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                    • #25
                      by all means the US should copy Ethiopia..
                      It might be argued that this is what coaches are urging runners to do?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by NotDutra5 View Post

                        Interesting that Purrier is brought up because, to me, she seems to have thinned out a bit once out of college.
                        That's an illusion. She's added muscle and is more defined so she looks more ripped but not due to weight loss. She just turned fat to lean muscle probably with a change in training. Lean muscle is what you want, losing weight will cause muscle loss 5 foot 3 and 120 is not thin.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post

                          Right ...by all means the US should copy Ethiopia...

                          Malnutrition contributes to more than 50 percent of all infant and child deaths in Ethiopia. The damage caused by malnutrition during the first 1,000 days—from the start of a woman’s pregnancy to her child’s second birthday—is usually irreversible in terms of its negative impact on the child’s health, cognitive development, physical growth, and school and work performance later in life. In Ethiopia, the major causes of malnutrition are persistent food insecurity, poor maternal and child feeding practices, high incidence of infectious diseases, and limited access to quality nutrition services. Household wealth, education, and family planning are also key drivers of children’s nutrition. Twenty-seven percent of women in Ethiopia are thin or malnourished and 38 percent of children suffer from stunting. Ethiopia’s lowland pastoral areas and densely populated, food-insecure highland woredas (districts) suffer frequent droughts, complicating access to and consumption of nutritious foods.

                          https://www.usaid.gov/ethiopia/nutrition
                          Of course that stat is meaningless because while 27% of Ethi women may be malnourished it means 73% are not. The obesity rate for American women is 67% so you tell me which country should copy which.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by JMysterio View Post

                            That's an illusion. She's added muscle and is more defined so she looks more ripped but not due to weight loss.
                            So then it isn't an illusion.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by jc203 View Post

                              It might be argued that this is what coaches are urging runners to do?
                              It is too late for that....you want stunted growth in childhood to copy Ethiopians....at least the ones that survive.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post

                                This isn't unique to Oregon by any means.
                                My comments weren't intended to limit the situation to Oregon if it appeared that way.

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