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  • #31
    I took the liberty of rewriting your words to focus on the real moral failure in the whole situation.

    Failure to inform subjects of your decision is one of the worst habits. It adds absolutely nothing, other than demonstrating low class and lack of creativity.

    That's the aspect that gets me. Think of all the options available. All the ways. Only the dullards resort to posting it in the results.

    Fools and simpletons


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    • #32
      Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
      She went to a comprehensive school which explains her behavior....
      So did I....

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Trickstat View Post

        So did I....

        Most of my British running friends all went to some type of comprehensive. None of them would swear at all let alone at the end of a race.

        Quite different these days.

        According to a report in the U.K.’s Daily Mail, one school in the town of Wellingborough is allowing pupils to swear at teachers, providing they only do so no more than five times in a class. A tally of how many times the f-word is used will be kept and if the class exceeds the limit, they will be “spoken” to, the newspaper reported.

        The school believes the policy will improve behavior, but parents and parliamentary members have condemned the rule and warned it would backfire.



        https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna9132814
        Last edited by Conor Dary; 11-11-2021, 02:18 PM.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post


          Most of my British running friends all went to some type of comprehensive. None of them would swear at all let alone at the end of a race.

          Quite different these days.

          According to a report in the U.K.’s Daily Mail, one school in the town of Wellingborough is allowing pupils to swear at teachers, providing they only do so no more than five times in a class. A tally of how many times the f-word is used will be kept and if the class exceeds the limit, they will be “spoken” to, the newspaper reported.

          The school believes the policy will improve behavior, but parents and parliamentary members have condemned the rule and warned it would backfire.



          https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna9132814
          Brits. Maybe instead of using the swear words, everybody should just use "spam" instead.
          "Teacher...SPAM you!!"
          You drop a glass and break it..."Spam!"
          You set a huge PR and finish 2nd in state XC? "Holy spam! Spammin' A!"

          Eventually they would ban saying "spam" at the State Meet.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by DrJay View Post

            Brits. Maybe instead of using the swear words, everybody should just use "spam" instead.
            "Teacher...SPAM you!!"
            You drop a glass and break it..."Spam!"
            You set a huge PR and finish 2nd in state XC? "Holy spam! Spammin' A!"

            Eventually they would ban saying "spam" at the State Meet.
            Exactly....this is how many high school track officials think...

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            • #36
              Originally posted by DrJay View Post

              Brits. Maybe instead of using the swear words, everybody should just use "spam" instead.
              "Teacher...SPAM you!!"
              You drop a glass and break it..."Spam!"
              You set a huge PR and finish 2nd in state XC? "Holy spam! Spammin' A!"

              Eventually they would ban saying "spam" at the State Meet.
              "Lovely spam, wonderful spam."

              Comment


              • #37
                Curious about the origin and meaning of the f-word, I did some wiki-ing. The complete evolution of the word is beyond the scope of this thread but the first written reference is from the 1100s when the Old English word for swivel/thrusting/striking was used in a sexual context. Medieval farmers "fucked" the soil in planting crops.
                Languages, obviously, had/have different words with varying degrees of slang/acceptably for referring to sexual intercourse. In my environment, when I was a child, the f-word was rarely spoken and never in polite or female company.
                It seems to have segued into a meaningless all-purpose noun/ verb/ adjective/expletive/exhortation/exclamation. While it has lost much public shock value, after twenty years in the military and fifty years in the oil patch it still grates my ancient sensibilities in certain circumstances.
                As noted elsewhere in this thread, some officials tend to over-officiate. While his exclamation was inappropriate, today, I probably would not have heard it.
                Full disclosure: Thirty years ago, after warning him, I DQed a "roid-raged" world-class shotputter in a conference championship for repeated vulgar/obscene outbursts during competition in close proximity to spectator stands. I would do the same today in that scenario. His coach thanked me.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post


                  Most of my British running friends all went to some type of comprehensive. None of them would swear at all let alone at the end of a race.

                  Quite different these days.

                  According to a report in the U.K.’s Daily Mail, one school in the town of Wellingborough is allowing pupils to swear at teachers, providing they only do so no more than five times in a class. A tally of how many times the f-word is used will be kept and if the class exceeds the limit, they will be “spoken” to, the newspaper reported.

                  The school believes the policy will improve behavior, but parents and parliamentary members have condemned the rule and warned it would backfire.



                  https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna9132814
                  Although it's only about an hour from me, I don't think I've ever been to Wellingborough but I remember a colleague saying it was a little rough in parts. This appears to confirm that.

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                  • #39


                    The 4 Northamptonshire towns named among the UK's best places to live

                    Wellingborough is one of the smallest towns in the county, and also one of the oldest, too. It's on the north side of the River Nene and is referenced in the Domesday Book of 1086.

                    its population of 50,000 is set to rise according to a recent study which predicts housing and jobs are going to surge in the town. So, it's a great place to settle now and get ahead of the new crowds over the next few years.

                    According to YOPA, the average house price here is more than £30,000 below the national average at £222,157. This, paired with the fact that 100% of its secondary schools have a 'good' or better OFSTED rating makes it the perfect place for young families to settle.

                    Crime rates are also relatively low, at 87.15 per 1,000 people, however drug and alcohol use is above average in the town.

                    The average weekly salary is lower than the national average at £437 but its proximity to green spaces such as Stanwick Lakes make it a great option for those wanting to get out into the countryside.

                    Final score: 138/200

                    https://www.northantslive.news/news/...-among-4730506

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                    • #40
                      The train from Nottingham to St. Pancras that I took dozens of times goes through Wellingborough...I thought it sounded familiar...

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                      • #41
                        on topic, please

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by lonewolf View Post
                          It seems to have segued into a meaningless all-purpose noun/ verb/ adjective/expletive/exhortation/exclamation.
                          Which brings to mind this underground classic from Jack Wagner, "The Voice of Disneyland":

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            George Carlin was right. No bad words. Bad feelings. Bad intentions. But no bad words. DQ a kid if he/she used the F-word with malice toward another athlete or official or coach. But not in this kind of situation.

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                            • #44
                              In an interview, Country Joe McDonald suggested that his F-word chant at Woodstock was a trigger in bringing the word into mainstream use.

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                              • #45
                                link to the kid's public statement now on home page

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