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  • heat training

    To quote Brian Sell from his blog- "At least the weather is breaking a bit up here in the "arctic". A couple of days ago it almost reached 50 degrees. It sure felt good to get out in shorts and a T-shirt finally. We'll be going down to Florida again for a final stint of heat training."

    I think 50 degrees feels really hot if you are wearing some extra clothing- like warmup pants, a few shirts, a windbreaker, hat and gloves. And if shorts and t shirt are good at 50, what will be worn when it gets above 80?
    I don't think runners living in the southern climes corner the market on heat training. Anyone can do it any time! But if you want a sunny vacation, then go for it.

  • #2
    Re: heat training

    Originally posted by Helen S
    And if shorts and t shirt are good at 50, what will be worn when it gets above 80?
    Obviously, we guys can take the shirt off, but that's all you can do. (Shut up, Squack, tafnut, hammy, and all the rest :evil: ) From there you just sweat and sweat some more. In the summers in Georgia, you definitely avoid the afternoon. Not that it feels that great in the morning or at night, though. :roll:

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    • #3
      Re: heat training

      Originally posted by Helen S
      I don't think runners living in the southern climes corner the market on heat training. Anyone can do it any time! But if you want a sunny vacation, then go for it.
      The heat is not bad out here. It is the humidity that I cannot stand. When I am out running in the summer, I do it in the afternoon because I like that time of day. Although I hate the humidity, I workout in it so I can be mentally tough. Those 90 degrees and 80% and above humidity days are harsh. As long as I am drinking water, I should not have a problem. When I was in Arizona, I would train at 9 A.M. in the summertime. By then, it is already 95 degrees and above (less humidity than the South). In California, I would train in the afternoon when it was over 100 degrees (hardly any humidity). Last year in the Middle East, I would sometimes train in the afternoon (of course) when it was over 120 degrees (humid, no). If you have not guessed it by now, I LOVE the heat. I am able to train in the heat of the summer because I am drinking water and covering myself. The sweat actually cools you better when you are covered. Weird huh? My head gets so cool because I cover it in the terrible sand storms in the Middle East. And you thought the sand storms are bad in Arizona? No way! I prefer to keep my clothes on when I train, wether I am in the South or not.

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      • #4
        Training in the heat- something done because that is what the weather is outside, or possibly deliberately running in the warm part of the day to prepare for upcoming races where it may be hot

        Heat training- preparing for races in hot weather or climate. this is done to prepare they body physiologically for dealing with it more effectively (by sweating more easily and profusely). As I recall from USATF endurance school, heat elimination becomes a major energy drain in hot conditions.

        I scoffed when David Morris said post race that he did not feel the need to heat train before the Pittsburgh marathon trials. After the race, which was 72 at start time and eventually got up to 86, although the olympic hopefuls that finished were done by then, eveyone complained about the heat. At least Mr. Sell is considering it as something to actively try to do.
        As a distance runner, it has got to be really warm before I start shedding clothes. It's amusing to run past someone out in just shorts and shoes when it is 60 degrees and I have on numerous layers. But if we run a race when it's 80 or more, I am ready for it!

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