Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

U-20 WC

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by JumboElliott View Post
    That's why you have U18 competition.
    Huh, U18 height is 36", but for practical purposes 16/17 year olds in the USA almost exclusively run 39" in high school practices and meets. Shot put weights get a bit more confusing for throwers under 20 (6 kilo, 12 lb, 5 kilo, some states have 10 lb frosh or frosh/soph implements... some used to have ABC divisions...too much to sort out) Are you proposing that 16-17 year olds jump from 36" to 42" and from 5 kilo shots to 16 pounds when they become "adults" ? Or would it just be for U20 WC's ? I think the one group that would be at an advantage are USA college freshmen who have been training/competing with the higher/heavier stuff for a year (sometimes 2 depending on birthdate) compared to other countries, especially helpful in the decathlon. I'm sure some of the other 18-19 year old hurdlers/throwers in other countries have started training with higher/heavier as well.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by DET59 View Post

      Huh, U18 height is 36", but for practical purposes 16/17 year olds in the USA almost exclusively run 39" in high school practices and meets. Shot put weights get a bit more confusing for throwers under 20 (6 kilo, 12 lb, 5 kilo, some states have 10 lb frosh or frosh/soph implements... some used to have ABC divisions...too much to sort out) Are you proposing that 16-17 year olds jump from 36" to 42" and from 5 kilo shots to 16 pounds when they become "adults" ? Or would it just be for U20 WC's ? I think the one group that would be at an advantage are USA college freshmen who have been training/competing with the higher/heavier stuff for a year (sometimes 2 depending on birthdate) compared to other countries, especially helpful in the decathlon. I'm sure some of the other 18-19 year old hurdlers/throwers in other countries have started training with higher/heavier as well.
      I imagine the determination of what weights and hurdles heights are appropriate won't be made around what one country's high school and college athletes are doing!!

      Comment


      • Originally posted by JumboElliott View Post

        Then they should change them back
        And women - even U16 women - should all throw/hurdle senior men's standards....

        God only knows why..

        Comment




        • I imagine the determination of what weights and hurdles heights are appropriate won't be made around what one country's high school and college athletes are doing!![/QUOTE]

          Actually I think they were, as WA U20 hurdle height set at the absurd 0.99 meters was based on equipment made for USA high achool/British school boys. One case where inches prevailed over meters. Im atill trying to figure out why anyone wants to change U20 heights/weights? The only change I'd like to see is USA high schoolers throw 4 kilo and 6 kilo shots and run 1500 instead of 1600. (and 3000 for 3200).

          Comment


          • I think high school girls *do* use the 4k shot in most (all?) states. I don't recall any 8 lb marks appearing in HST for years, so it may be universal now.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by cigar95 View Post
              They run 36 inch hurdles. (Or did fairly recently.)
              Yes they still do.

              Comment


              • In the days when the World and European U-20 Champs used the senior heights and weights, the British U-20 Champs would usually be the only domestic meeting that year where British athletes competed with these in a competition that was purely for their age-group.

                Comment


                • US 4x1’s EMBARRASSED again. Who makes such bone headed decisions? US ran Autumn Wilson 2nd and she was late leaving and almost passed by Jayla Jamison. Then she is dying (baton time line to line was 11.15) and Iyana Gray almost runs away from her. Shawnti Jackson takes 3 steps and gets baton and then switches hands immediately. Who does that at this level? But running a rolling start split of 11.15 and leaving a 100m and 200m finalist off the squad that ran several 10.1/2 anchors all year is inexcusable. Wilson was only measurably faster in the trial on Thursday so making the call to use her is a head scratcher. I see Carmelita Jeter is women’s sprint coach so she must be trying to recruit Wilson away from the old USC coach now at Georgia where Wilson is headed.

                  But of course the men’s crew was even worse. Across the line 3rd in trial and 4th in final but DQ’s result in their being 8th best into final and stealing an ugly bronze after South Africa DQ. Ran guys in final in different spots than in trial. That’s poor coaching and I thought that USATF had invested in full-time relay coaches for US teams but watching Canada whip the US team that had swept the 100 days earlier in Eugene and now this mess makes he wonder who could possibly screw this up so bad? Probably different coaches for the team in Eugene than U20 but still total incompetence.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Vault-emort View Post
                    Was very disappointed with the M4x100 heat this morning. AUS running quick and well ahead of the field - including the US - when Aidan Murphy took off too early and ruined any chance of a legal handover.

                    The boys had looked likely to smash the national record - and with 200m bronze medallist Calab Law likely to come into the team for the final - they might have gone even faster.

                    Australia has had some bad luck in this championships. We usually manage a bunch of medals, but it may be lean pickings in Cali.
                    I think that's the weakest single aspect of any event in track and field...the ongoing sustained incompetence of 4 x 100 relay runners leaving at the wrong time. In a different heat the British commentator was bemoaning that the British third leg, "left 5 minutes too early."

                    I have no idea what causes this. Every time I look for a commonality it doesn't appear to exist. Previously the early/late ratio seemed fairly balanced. But nowadays it's all the rage to leave early. Sometimes I think it has to be movement from an adjacent lane. They see that runner going and think they have to do so. But in examples like this week with Australia that doesn't work because often it's the team in the lead dashing away for no apparent reason.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Vault-emort View Post
                      lol - 2 in the first 3 of the girl's walk being given a third red card in the last lap but neither going.to the sin-bin

                      the 2 remaining leaders actually sprint up the home straight...
                      Both race walks were high comedy over the final meters. I felt so awful for the Japanese girl who placed second. She made a legitimate move to take the lead on the final turn. Then the other girl somehow found a way to gain two meters over the final five meters. It's like she understood nothing would be called at that stage so she just dashed across the line. She was grinning ear to ear, while the race commentator was trying to restrain himself from fully describing how ridiculous it looked.

                      Then the exact same thing happened in the men's race, albeit for bronze and not gold.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Awsi Dooger View Post

                        I think that's the weakest single aspect of any event in track and field...the ongoing sustained incompetence of 4 x 100 relay runners leaving at the wrong time. In a different heat the British commentator was bemoaning that the British third leg, "left 5 minutes too early."

                        I have no idea what causes this. Every time I look for a commonality it doesn't appear to exist. Previously the early/late ratio seemed fairly balanced. But nowadays it's all the rage to leave early. Sometimes I think it has to be movement from an adjacent lane. They see that runner going and think they have to do so. But in examples like this week with Australia that doesn't work because often it's the team in the lead dashing away for no apparent reason.
                        My guess is that there are 2 most likely scenarios (applies mainly to last leg but occasionally on other legs):

                        1) outgoing runners on teams that are leading but are anxious that they will get run down, as there are likely faster people on other teams, may panic and go early because their instincts fool them into thinking that if they go early that will increase the lead they inherit.
                        2) outgoing runners on teams that aren't leading, but think they have a good chance of running down the leader, go early because their instincts have fooled them into thinking that will leave them with less ground to make up.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Awsi Dooger View Post

                          Both race walks were high comedy over the final meters.
                          I was there in the Sydney stadium for '96 World Juniors when Natalie Saville (younger sister of Jane) was involved in a medal duel with 110m to go. She accelerated and I was on my feet in the stands yelling 'oh no, OH NO!!' as I thought a DQ was inevitable (and it was).

                          Jane's DQ in Sydney four years later was a real heart-breaker. I only saw that on TV but was convinced Jane had been hampered (any maybe lost contact as a result) when another athlete (Italian?) with three red cards did not leave the course and was still contesting the lead with Jane. She should have been dragged off.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Trickstat View Post

                            1) outgoing runners on teams that are leading but are anxious that they will get run down, as there are likely faster people on other teams,
                            Aidan Murphy probably shouldn't have been too worried he would have been run down as he is a better 200/400 runner than 100.

                            Just a rookie error I guess - he hasn't had too much experience running relays at a top (even national) level. The Aussies did do some relay camps this year and expected this team to be a decent chance of a medal.

                            But maybe - like his mum who didn't have much experience at international 4x1s before she won a Commonwealth gold (& a 4x4 gold) in 1998 - first leg might have been a better option for him.

                            Comment


                            • Delayed coverage of Day 4 is currently being shown on CNBC. Started at 7amET, continues until 10amET. 2nd section of Hep 800 coming up

                              Comment


                              • The link on the WA site to the live radiocast isn't there now!
                                Today's program hasn't begun yet (about 25 more minutes), but I don't recall that link not being there!!

                                I have it now!!
                                LOL
                                Last edited by aaronk; 08-06-2022, 08:40 PM.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X