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  • #46
    Originally posted by Big Tusk View Post

    It looks like he stopped at exactly 9,000 posts. That's probably not a coincidence.
    IIRC...he may have been stopped. I'm also not sure he's as gone as some think.
    Last edited by NotDutra5; 08-17-2022, 04:53 PM.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by NotDutra5 View Post

      IIRC...he may have been stopped. I'm also not sure he's as gone as some think.
      Indeed, Tuariki was given a one-week timeout on March 24:

      https://forum.trackandfieldnews.com/...15#post1743115

      Hasn't posted since.

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      • #48
        I still have no idea how people actually pole vault…..it’s crazy!

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Liuxuan_rol View Post
          I still have no idea how people actually pole vault…..it’s crazy!
          When I was practising track (I was a sprinter), I tried once by curiosity to see what it felt to pole vault... infact, I did not even try.
          Too dangerous when you have zero experience.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by 79 View Post

            When I was practising track (I was a sprinter), I tried once by curiosity to see what it felt to pole vault... infact, I did not even try.
            Too dangerous when you have zero experience.
            With proper instructions at the heights beginners start with, pole vaulting is very safe. Bruised ego is the biggest injury.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by DET59 View Post

              With proper instructions at the heights beginners start with, pole vaulting is very safe. Bruised ego is the biggest injury.
              I have been officiating the vault for over twenty years, at University and all-comers level and not too many meets a year. The worst injury was a sprained ankle and broken-pole hand injury, even muscle strains have been rare and I am not sure that I have had a real torn muscle. That is not the world that I started in. I have been officiating at the University of Wisconsin starting about 1992, starting as a clearly redundant timer and then the high jump. In 2002 I arrived at the first indoor meet and they asked me if I could take over the vault, the volunteer assistance was a vaulter and said he would help me through and I had no problems that winter other than a few mistakes caught quickly. One pressure was they Wisconsin was going to host the Big Ten outdoor meet that year and I would either run it or more likely be the main assistant and run pit 2 in the decathlon. Then they had the Big Ten Men's Indoor at Minnesota and the freshman Penn State vaulter (16' high school guy) had a crazy vault and inverted when he was no where close to the pit and let go; he went head-first in to the box and I wondered what in the world have I gotten myself in to. I think that there were at least two high school vaulters who died that spring... High schools required longer pits, padding (rather than a concrete pad that was common, etc. There have been very few vault fatalities since then; I cannot remember one but there must have been some in twenty years.

              As for myself I was very small (1.50., sub-5 feet tall, less than 40kg (about 84 pounds) when I started high school in 1964. I started running XC after having a hernia operation. In freshman gym class run by the head track coach (big high school, 3000, in southern California. We did the pole vault for part of a week using steel and bamboo poles and I made ten feet (3.05m). That was the only time I vaulted, I was seen as a secondary distance runner. So it has always seemed odd to me that much better athletes struggle to get to four meters after having coaching,much more training and better equipment.

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              • #52
                Senior citizen here. I still feel the pain from 110mH race when I was 16.

                I suggest TJ is worst sport for joints.
                Whatever happened to use of safety helmet for teenage pole vaulters?

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                • #53
                  I would say that Pole Vault would logically be the most dangerous event to compete in. However, I am not aware of any deaths or life-changing injuries occurring in the event in the UK in the near 50 years that I have been interested in the sport. The US's larger population and High School sport does mean that there is a lot more vaulting taking place overall then there is here so it is much more likely for the occasional serious accident to occur.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Trickstat View Post
                    I would say that Pole Vault would logically be the most dangerous event to compete in. However, I am not aware of any deaths or life-changing injuries occurring in the event in the UK in the near 50 years that I have been interested in the sport. The US's larger population and High School sport does mean that there is a lot more vaulting taking place overall then there is here so it is much more likely for the occasional serious accident to occur.
                    We've discussed this before in the women's decathlon thread. Compared to the US pole vault facilities barely exist in the UK even though there are more than there use to be.

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                    • #55
                      I don't recall any recent deaths in the Pole Vault but in 2015 the promising young Austrian vaulter, Kira Grünberg, was left paralysed from the chest down after a training accident.

                      The accident is described on her Wiki page - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kira_Gr%C3%BCnberg

                      I remember that one of the benefit events held after her accident was a Pole Vault meeting organised by Renaud Lavillenie with all the proceeds going to Kira.

                      She is now a politician.

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by GHM View Post
                        Senior citizen here. I still feel the pain from 110mH race when I was 16.

                        I suggest TJ is worst sport for joints.
                        Whatever happened to use of safety helmet for teenage pole vaulters?
                        I talked with a number of collegiate vaulters and some had no opinion and others thought that they were dangerous, not helpful. At the same time that the helmets came in the rules for pits: longer because many of the problems were people rocketing through the pit and the short pits dumped them on the ground) and padding all around the pit.

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                        • #57
                          Sonny Bono and Gary Busey didn't pole vault. I worked in the ski industry when Bono died and helmet sales increased 400%... Busey is poster boy for the motorcycle helmet industry. When a helmet is mandated then school insurance companies become silent partners with the helmet industries. The R&D required to make an insurable pole vault or cheerleading helmet (the sport with a much higher head to hard surface injury rate) would probably end both activities. High schools (or in many cases, parents) are willing to pay a couple of hundred extra bucks a year per football player to take the risk of having football and insuring helmets.

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by DET59 View Post
                            Sonny Bono and Gary Busey didn't pole vault. I worked in the ski industry when Bono died and helmet sales increased 400%... Busey is poster boy for the motorcycle helmet industry. When a helmet is mandated then school insurance companies become silent partners with the helmet industries. The R&D required to make an insurable pole vault or cheerleading helmet (the sport with a much higher head to hard surface injury rate) would probably end both activities. High schools (or in many cases, parents) are willing to pay a couple of hundred extra bucks a year per football player to take the risk of having football and insuring helmets.
                            If 95% of serious ski injuries did not involve the head then there would not be as much demand. With motorcycles, there are a lot of serious injuries but a pretty high fraction include head injuries, and helmets make a big difference. I do not think that there is any evidence whatsoever that, over the last ten years, helmets would have helped at all. I suspect that they would make things worse as athletes would not be as careful. The death of the Penn State vaulter at the Big Tens in 2002 probably would not made a difference as he was landing on his head and broke his neck. The high school kids that same year would be made a difference as they landed on concrete but the extension of the pits and the padding around them is why the number of deaths and serious injuries when way down. I have warned vaulters when they get up high and are going way off to the side; if it happens again I will pull them out of competition because they (and even my assistants by the pit) can get injured.

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