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  • Britishisms in T&F

    It's not hugely important, but a couple of terms/phrases used mainly by British commentators (male or female, good or bad) intrigues me.

    When the Italian Men's 4 X 400 team was being introduced, they said "The Italians are usually USEFUL!"
    "Useful" is a word very often used by British announcers!!
    Tim Hutchings used it a LOT!!

    Another is when someone makes a 2nd attempt after missing the first, they'll say "She made it the 2nd time FOR THE ASKING!".
    "For the asking" is another term often heard in foreign circles, particularly from British commentators!

    Anything "useful" to add....."for the asking"??
    LOL

  • #2
    As I understand it, the Brits use the term " Useful" for an athlete who is competitive at a high level over several events or distances. The Brits can correct me.

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    • #3
      Inspirational...

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      • #4
        US (we say Americans) are mesmerized with British accept. I always say jokingly get a secretary with British accent if you want show class and fool others in your business.

        Off Topic:
        Please Watch https://athletics.eurovisionsports.t...ea-munich-2022

        It has live coverage and highlights. Live broadcast are done by British accent commentators. Some/many replays have no commentator at all
        Here is men 1500m replay https://athletics.eurovisionsports.t...ns-1500m-final

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        • #5
          Originally posted by lonewolf View Post
          As I understand it, the Brits use the term " Useful" for an athlete who is competitive at a high level over several events or distances. The Brits can correct me.
          It can kind of mean that, but generally, it just means 'good'.

          So it can be used as "Thiam is great in the LJ, and she's pretty useful in the HJ too". Or simply as "Thiam is pretty useful in the HJ".

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          • #6
            Originally posted by aaronk View Post
            I
            Another is when someone makes a 2nd attempt after missing the first, they'll say "She made it the 2nd time FOR THE ASKING!".
            "For the asking" is another term often heard in foreign circles, particularly from British commentators!
            It's 'second time OF asking'
            Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by aaronk View Post
              Another is when someone makes a 2nd attempt after missing the first, they'll say "She made it the 2nd time FOR THE ASKING!".
              "For the asking" is another term often heard in foreign circles, particularly from British commentators!

              LOL
              For the asking actually means someone can get something quite easily and without much effort, or for free.

              Commentators often say "she made it at/on the 2nd time of asking" though, which isn't quite correct, strictly speaking, and they often just mean she made it on her 2nd go. Not necessarily "without effort"

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Powell View Post

                It's 'second time OF asking'
                see my post above. There is a phrase "for the asking" which means easily...but I don't think they mean it that way in reality.

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                • #9
                  If a British commentator going through the line-up at the start of a relay heat says "the Italians are usually useful", it's a way of saying "I think that they'll be involved in the battle for the qualifying places rather than trailing in at the finish 50m behind everyone else."

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Powell View Post
                    It's 'second time OF asking'
                    It's the Brit penchant for verbosity.
                    "2nd try"

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                      It's the Brit penchant for verbosity.
                      Americans also excel at that sometimes. 😋

                      "A product of" ... "Out of" ... instead of a simple "from".

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                      • #12
                        American announcers will say "the 1st 3 finishers in each heat and the next 2 fastest times. British announcers will say, "the 1st 3 finishers in each heat and the next 2 fastest losers". LOL!!! For some reason that always make me laugh. LOL!!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by The Klingon View Post
                          American announcers will say "the 1st 3 finishers in each heat and the next 2 fastest times. British announcers will say, "the 1st 3 finishers in each heat and the next 2 fastest losers". LOL!!! For some reason that always make me laugh. LOL!!
                          IAAF put a stop to its stadium announcers using the "loser" terminology a dozen years or so ago.

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                          • #14
                            "Not to be"

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by LuckySpikes View Post
                              Americans also excel at that sometimes. 😋 "A product of" ... "Out of" ... instead of a simple "from".
                              ?!
                              'That's a product of a vivid imagination' doesn't carry the same connotation as 'that's from a vivid imagination'.
                              and
                              'out of' is hardly verbose!

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