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What's wrong with the high-jump event?...

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  • #46
    Two words: carbon fiber

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Trickstat View Post

      Quite possibly, or they are very close to it. I think, more than any other event, the HJ WRs are limited by basic human anatomy. To break the men's WR, I think there is a 'sweet spot' between 6'4" (1.93m and 6'7" (2.01m). If you are shorter than that, it is highly unlikely that you will be able to jump far enough above your own height to clear 2.46+. Taller than that, and there are almost always diminishing returns in areas such as strength/weight ratio, flexibility and coordination. Also the amount of people who are that tall is relatively small so the probability of one of them having the athleticism required is smaller. I think the equivalent range for the women's WR may be about 5'11 (1.80m) to 6'2" (1.88m).
      Barshim is 1.88 and he has come the closest, 2.43 and many good attempts at 2.46. Holm is 1.81 and jumped 2.40, so I don't think the height-over-head limit holds water.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by scottmitchell74 View Post

        Good video!

        It also highlights the point somebody else made: maybe modern HJers are not spending enough time in the weight room? Some of them are crazy skinny.
        Jesse Williams seemed to get bulkier later in his career, and never approached his best again.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by ceil View Post
          I thought I remembered her attempting 2.10 in Lausanne '17. Was that just a 2.08?
          Lasitskene also had 3 attempts at 2.10 in Hengelo (either 2017 or 2018). If memory serves me, none of them were close.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by berkeley View Post

            Barshim is 1.88 and he has come the closest, 2.43 and many good attempts at 2.46. Holm is 1.81 and jumped 2.40, so I don't think the height-over-head limit holds water.
            Holm is the joint holder of the differential record at 59cm. A 2.46 jumper will have to be at the absolute minimum 1.87. However, Holm is the taller of the 59cm jumpers and this makes it seem unlikely that a taller jumper can match the differential of the sub 6 footers.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Trickstat View Post

              Holm is the joint holder of the differential record at 59cm. A 2.46 jumper will have to be at the absolute minimum 1.87. However, Holm is the taller of the 59cm jumpers and this makes it seem unlikely that a taller jumper can match the differential of the sub 6 footers.
              Right, I'm not claiming that a 1.81 jumper is likely to break the world record, but saying that the originally stated 1.93-2.01 range is too narrow.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by berkeley View Post

                Right, I'm not claiming that a 1.81 jumper is likely to break the world record, but saying that the originally stated 1.93-2.01 range is too narrow.
                I wouldn't categorically rule out someone from outside that range breaking the record but I think it is at least 90% certain that they will fall within it.

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