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major philosophy difference for the sport

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  • #16
    Re: major philosophy difference for the sport

    All I know is this: Take away the money, lose a bunch of the fast athletes out there. I think track and field would digress a lot of you take away the big bucks. I for one care little about big bucks, but as an aspiring track athlete, it would seem very hard for me to make a good career out of running while working a full time job. There would just be to much inconsistancy from season to season, and im sure alot of current athletes would agree. maybe some of you forget how much time and effort track requires, and to be someone in the hunt for the top spots in the world, a full time job, along with other personal priorities, would just get in the way. Look at all other perfessional sports, they make WAY more money that track athletes just on base payment alone, could you see any of them just being an amatuer athlete in that sport making little to nothing, and still having the kind of competition that we have now come to expect? This is jut my opinion

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    • #17
      Re: major philosophy difference for the sport

      there is more and more of a
      >fight for pieces of a smaller and smaller
      >economic pie, and that *desperation* is revealed
      >in displays by people like Christie and Drummond
      >(who may have never even been tempted to raise
      >such a stink when they were amateurs in high
      >school or university

      THIS IS PITIFUL IF YOU, A TRACK FAN (?), THINK THAT THIS IS WHY THEY PROTESTED......

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      • #18
        Re: major philosophy difference for the sport

        >>>one of the influences in the increase in pursuit
        >of chemical training aids is money. The eastern
        >block seemed to lead the way in the 70's when
        >their athletes were professional for all intents
        >and purposes- it was basically 'dope or go home
        >and get a job as a welder because you won't be a
        >member of any state-sponsored athletics club'.>>

        The Eastbloc led the way in terms of government-sponsored doping programs, but as with just about all "technical innovation," it was the Americans--working independently--who were in the forefront of steroid experimentation in the early/mid '60s. (Recalling, of course, that it was legal at the time)

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