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  • JW's 43.91

    Wariner's 43.91 from Paris reshapes his position in the all-time 400m lists somewhat:

    Now has 5 of top 100(well 104) times of all time:
    M.Johnson has 34
    B.Reynolds 14
    Q.Watts 8
    S.Lewis 6
    D.Everett 5
    A.Harrison 5

    Of 37 sub 44 performances, Wariner has 2:
    M.Johnson has 22
    B.Reynolds 4
    Q.Watts 4
    D.Everett 2

    On average of 5 fastest times he's inches away from shifting into 4th place:
    Michael Johnson 43.43
    Quincy Watts 43.802
    Harry "Butch" Reynolds 43.828
    Danny Everett 44.028
    Jeremy Wariner 44.032
    Steve Lewis 44.106
    Alvin Harrison 44.194
    Samson Kitur 44.288
    Antonio Pettigrew 44.294
    Roberto Hernández 44.298

    All raw data taken from http://www.alltime-athletics.com/m_400ok.htm

  • #2
    i'm very pleased you posted the top 5 average

    i was thinking about that & reckoned 43.91, 43.93, 44.00, ?44.14 & 1 other musta shifted him up on the list

    great stats !!!

    Comment


    • #3
      One of my favorite guys, Danny Everett, is littered all over those lists, and still ahead of Wariner on avg. time, BUT unlike Wariner, and others there, Everett does not have any individual gold or silver medals from WC or Oly.

      Olympics:
      1988 Bronze
      1992 Did not medal in 400

      WC:
      1991- Bronze

      US Nationals:
      1986- 5th
      1987 - 4th
      1991 - 4th
      1992 - 1st in 43.81 MR (beat Lewis, Watts, Valmon and Reynolds!)


      It seems he was running those fast times in the wrong era, or was not peaking properly for the majors, or....?? The relays were, of course a different thing and he's got loads of relay hardware.

      (interesting things I noticed as well -- in '91 gets 4th at US Nats, but somehow qualifies for and medals at '91 worlds. Also, sets meet record at US Oly trials in '92 and does not medal in Barcelona (ind. 400))

      Comment


      • #4
        He also missed out on individual gold at the NCAAs, however did break the indoor world record in '92

        here's a little blurb from the UCLA Hall of Fame when he was inducted in 2003:

        EVERETT, DANNY - Everett starred for UCLA in track & field in the 400 meters and relays for three years (1986-87-88) and helped lead the Bruin to two consecutive Pac-10 titles and NCAA Championships (1987-88). Individually, Everett won back-to-back Pac-10 titles in the 400m, set a Pac-10 meet record of 44.34 in 1988 and was a member of three victorious Pac-10 relay squads. At the 1987 NCAA championship meet, Everett placed second in the 400m, first in the 1600m relay and third in the 400m relay. Everett also led UCLA to the 1988 national title by placing second in the 400m relay, and first in both the 400m and 1600m relay. (The 1600m relay team set a NCAA record of 2:59.91 which still stands.) Everett also holds UCLA's second fastest time ever in the 400m at 43.98. At the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, Everett placed third behind fellow Bruin Steve Lewis in the 400m, and was part of the gold medal winning U.S. 1600m relay team that set the world record of 2:56:16. After the Olympics, Everett ran for the Santa Monica Track Club and set world records in the 300m (31.48) and 400m indoor (45.02). He also won the 400m at the 1992 U.S. Track and Field Championships and established himself as the favorite in the 1992 Olympics in the 400m and relays. Unfortunately, Everett injured his Achilles tendon in the semifinals of the 400m and missed the rest of the Games. Everett was ranked in the Top 5 in the world at 400m from 1987-1992.

        http://uclabruins.cstv.com/genrel/092303aaa.html

        Comment


        • #5
          Here's the list of averages for best 10 performances:

          Michael Johnson 43.557
          Harry "Butch" Reynolds 43.976
          Quincy Watts 44.049
          Danny Everett 44.187
          Steve Lewis 44.238
          Jeremy Wariner 44.254
          Alvin Harrison 44.346
          Tyree Washington 44.375
          Antonio Pettigrew 44.383
          Samson Kitur 44.400

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by eldrick
            i'm very pleased you posted the top 5 average

            i was thinking about that & reckoned 43.91, 43.93, 44.00, ?44.14 & 1 other musta shifted him up on the list

            great stats !!!
            The list has 44.12 and 44.20 (the 72nd best mark, so 5 in the top 72 (or 74). As good as these are, the average for #3 on the list is almost a tenth better than his PR, so he still has some to go even to approach Watts or Butch. Also, all of JW's marks are wins, no seconds or thirds in the group.

            Comment


            • #7
              Here is the list for non-altitude times. Rounded to the nearest 100th. Pretty sure it's correct. Enjoy!!

              ALL TIME 400M AVERAGES*


              1.Michael Johnson: (43.18, 43.39, 43.44, 43.49, 43.65, 43.66, 43.66, 43.68, USA 43.68, 43.74) Avg. 43.56

              2.Harry Reynolds: (43.29, 43.91, 43.93, 43.93, 44.08, 44.10, 44.12, 44.13, USA 44.14, 44.15) Avg. 43.98

              3.Quincy Watts: (43.50, 43.71, 43.83, 43.97, 44.00, 44.24, 44.60, 44.63, USA 44.65, 44.67) Avg. 44.18

              4.Danny Everett: (43.81, 43.98, 44.06, 44.09, 44.20, 44.32, 44.34, 44.35, USA 44.36, 44.36) Avg. 44.19

              5.Jeremy Wariner: (43.91, 43.93, 44.00, 44.12, 44.20, 44.31, 44.37, 44.50, USA 44.53, 44.67) Avg. 44.25

              6.Steve Lewis: (43.87, 44.08, 44.11, 44.21, 44.26, 44.35, 44.37, 44.41, USA 44.45, 44.52) Avg. 44.26

              7.Tyree Washington: (44.28, 44.29, 44.33, 44.38, 44.38, 44.39, 44.42, 44.42, USA 44.43, 44.43) Avg. 44.37

              8.Antonio Pettigrew: (44.21, 44.23, 44.27, 44.36, 44.40, 44.43, 44.45, 44.47, USA 44.49, 44.52) Avg. 44.38

              9.Alvin Harrison: (44.09, 44.18, 44.19, 44.40, 44.43, 44.52, 44.53, 44.61, USA 44.62, 44.63) Avg. 44.42

              10.Samson Kitur (44.18, 44.24, 44.32, 44.34, 44.47, 44.50, 44.54, 44.54, KEN 44.59, 44.65) Avg. 44.44

              11.Roberto Hernandez: (44.14, 44.30, 44.40, 44.43, 44.51, 44.52, 44.52, 44.52, CUB 44.56, 44.57) Avg. 44.45

              12.Iwan Thomas: Avg.44.48
              GBR
              13.Jerome Young / Innocent Egbunike: Avg. 44.50
              USA NGR
              14.Andrew Valmon: Avg. 44.51
              USA

              *Based on the 10 best non-altitude performances.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by proofs in the pudd'in
                13.Jerome Young / Innocent Egbunike: Avg. 44.50
                USA NGR
                14.Andrew Valmon: Avg. 44.51
                USA
                If Young and Egbunike are tied for 13th, then the next guy on the list (Valmon) is 15th, not 14th.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by richxx87
                  interesting things I noticed as well -- in '91 gets 4th at US Nats, but somehow qualifies for and medals at '91 worlds.
                  Quincy Watts gave up his place in the individual event in Tokyo - that's what enabled Everett to run. The interesting thing was Watts ended up running 43.4 in the Tokyo relay final, suggesting he could well have won individual gold. Does anyone know why he decided against doing the individual 400?
                  Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Powell
                    Originally posted by richxx87
                    interesting things I noticed as well -- in '91 gets 4th at US Nats, but somehow qualifies for and medals at '91 worlds.
                    Quincy Watts gave up his place in the individual event in Tokyo - that's what enabled Everett to run. The interesting thing was Watts ended up running 43.4 in the Tokyo relay final, suggesting he could well have won individual gold. Does anyone know why he decided against doing the individual 400?
                    As I remember it, he was sick (flu or something). He hadn't raced or trained consistantly in the weeks prior to the WC. While he was well at the WC, he felt Everett had a better chance to medal. Unrelated to his ilness, he was sick after running his leg very hard and was puking so violently afterward he dislocated his jaw.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tandfman
                      Originally posted by proofs in the pudd'in
                      13.Jerome Young / Innocent Egbunike: Avg. 44.50
                      USA NGR
                      14.Andrew Valmon: Avg. 44.51
                      USA
                      If Young and Egbunike are tied for 13th, then the next guy on the list (Valmon) is 15th, not 14th.
                      Yes if you want to look at like that----but I was looking at it according to the Avg. time not the person, each person fits into a time slot. You can have 30 people occupying an Avg. time of 44.50 that would give Valmon a 44th placing which is not indicative of his Avg. but the number of athletes. You could say "Valmon is 44th on the all-time Avg list" and that would not be fair to him or representative of his true Avg. The best thing to do is to list the number of athletes that occupy the list at the bottom or top.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by proofs in the pudd'in
                        Yes if you want to look at like that----but I was looking at it according to the Avg. time not the person, each person fits into a time slot. You can have 30 people occupying an Avg. time of 44.50 that would give Valmon a 44th placing which is not indicative of his Avg. but the number of athletes. You could say "Valmon is 44th on the all-time Avg list" and that would not be fair to him or representative of his true Avg. The best thing to do is to list the number of athletes that occupy the list at the bottom or top.
                        Actually, it would be both fair and accurate. If there are 43 people with better average times than you, then you are 44th. People, not disembodied averages or times, compete in track and field.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Powell
                          Originally posted by richxx87
                          interesting things I noticed as well -- in '91 gets 4th at US Nats, but somehow qualifies for and medals at '91 worlds.
                          Quincy Watts gave up his place in the individual event in Tokyo - that's what enabled Everett to run. The interesting thing was Watts ended up running 43.4 in the Tokyo relay final, suggesting he could well have won individual gold. Does anyone know why he decided against doing the individual 400?
                          The T&FN coverage said he cited his bad form (only 4th in the Pan-Am Games earlier in the month, 46+) and ceded his spot to Everett on the eve of the meet.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Shalgo
                            Originally posted by proofs in the pudd'in
                            Yes if you want to look at like that----but I was looking at it according to the Avg. time not the person, each person fits into a time slot. You can have 30 people occupying an Avg. time of 44.50 that would give Valmon a 44th placing which is not indicative of his Avg. but the number of athletes. You could say "Valmon is 44th on the all-time Avg list" and that would not be fair to him or representative of his true Avg. The best thing to do is to list the number of athletes that occupy the list at the bottom or top.
                            Actually, it would be both fair and accurate. If there are 43 people with better average times than you, then you are 44th. People, not disembodied averages or times, compete in track and field.
                            Yes YOU are 44th but the Avg. time is not the 44th. I was just trying to point out the best Avg times--It just a statistics "way of looking at it".

                            If you were to tell me and not show me that Valmon had the 44th avg. time it could be construed as alot of diff. avg. times between 13th and 44th---which of course there is not.

                            Anyway no big deal it was just for peoples enjoyment

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              [quote=proofs in the pudd'in]
                              Originally posted by Shalgo
                              Originally posted by "proofs in the pudd'in":1dnvmsii
                              Yes if you want to look at like that----but I was looking at it according to the Avg. time not the person, each person fits into a time slot. You can have 30 people occupying an Avg. time of 44.50 that would give Valmon a 44th placing which is not indicative of his Avg. but the number of athletes. You could say "Valmon is 44th on the all-time Avg list" and that would not be fair to him or representative of his true Avg. The best thing to do is to list the number of athletes that occupy the list at the bottom or top.
                              Actually, it would be both fair and accurate. If there are 43 people with better average times than you, then you are 44th. People, not disembodied averages or times, compete in track and field.
                              Yes YOU are 44th but the Avg. time is not the 44th. I was just trying to point out the best Avg times--It just a statistics "way of looking at it".
                              [/quote:1dnvmsii]
                              There isn't a track statistician in the world who would look at it that way.

                              Comment

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