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  • #16
    i find the table of stats on the 6-meter jumpers fascinating. but, as a fan of the pv on the ground only, i have a couple of questions. the pushoff stat ? please explain that. and does the 5.20 pole index refer to flex rating or what? be nice. i was an english major. math and stuff like that makes me very, very afraid.

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    • #17
      Brad said the meet was held in a small stadium with a regular runway. Not a raised one. Hopefully this mark does count. :P

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      • #18
        Originally posted by polevaultpower
        Originally posted by tafnut
        So IS there any such thing as an 'exhibition' any more or has it gone the way of the dodo?
        I'd be willing to bet if someone in the US had a big beach/street vault and didn't get a USATF sanction, if any BIG marks were set, somebody would get mad and call it exhibition.

        Toby Stevenson had a truly exhibition meet in a hockey rink in his hometown earlier this year. It sounded pretty cool. At the end they tried to kick the ceiling, and Hartwig managed to dig both of his heels in.
        As long as it had competent officiating, and the runwway wasn't downhill, T&FN would carry on its lists.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by fieldguy
          i find the table of stats on the 6-meter jumpers fascinating. but, as a fan of the pv on the ground only, i have a couple of questions. the pushoff stat ? please explain that. and does the 5.20 pole index refer to flex rating or what? be nice. i was an english major. math and stuff like that makes me very, very afraid.
          Pushoff stat = how high the bar was above their top hand. Bubka could go 4'.

          5.20 refers to the length of the pole in meters. 5.20 is a 17' pole, which is MIGHTY big.

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          • #20
            The 5.20 index refers to the flex number of the pole, which is a measure of the stiffness of the pole.

            I probably should have just put flex #, but I was copying Petrov's chart and I wanted to stay close to what he wrote.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Jumpman
              Brad said the meet was held in a small stadium with a regular runway. Not a raised one. Hopefully this mark does count. :P
              Yeah if it was in a stadium, there should be no issues there. A big meet like that I assume was officiated properly.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by polevaultpower
                The 5.20 index refers to the flex number of the pole, which is a measure of the stiffness of the pole.

                I probably should have just put flex #, but I was copying Petrov's chart and I wanted to stay close to what he wrote.
                Are you sure Becca? Flex Numbers are usually expressed in tenths and a 5.2 pole would be an iron bar (5cm (2") deflection with a 50-lb wt hanging from the middle of a horizontal pole). I'm pretty sure that's the Length of the pole (but I'm not looking at the chart).

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by tafnut
                  Originally posted by polevaultpower
                  The 5.20 index refers to the flex number of the pole, which is a measure of the stiffness of the pole.

                  I probably should have just put flex #, but I was copying Petrov's chart and I wanted to stay close to what he wrote.
                  Are you sure Becca? Flex Numbers are usually expressed in tenths and a 5.2 pole would be an iron bar (5cm (2") deflection with a 50-lb wt hanging from the middle of a horizontal pole). I'm pretty sure that's the Length of the pole (but I'm not looking at the chart).
                  well, i took index of the 520 pole to try to standardize the flex numbers since not all of the vaulters used 520 poles, so is it the flex # had everybody been on a 520? I have heard that burgess was on a 500cm pole, toby on a 510. while obviously bubka and hartwig were on 520's when they set their pr's

                  now, i have heard rumors of poles longer than 520 being used but nobody has used them very efficiently yet obviously.

                  man, those flex #'s are stiff. on the poles I use my flex's are like 19.X, of course, i still haven't moved even to 490's yet(of course at 68" tall and 150#'s and not super fast that is kind of what you get)

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Jumpman
                    Brad said the meet was held in a small stadium with a regular runway. Not a raised one. Hopefully this mark does count. :P

                    Well, it's actually a soccer field with cement poured with a pole vault runway added

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by gh
                      As long as it had competent officiating, and the runwway wasn't downhill, T&FN would carry on its lists.
                      Do you actually do a detailed investigation for every meet of this sort?
                      Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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                      • #26
                        What I was getting at was it was not a raised sprung runway.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by tafnut
                          Originally posted by polevaultpower
                          The 5.20 index refers to the flex number of the pole, which is a measure of the stiffness of the pole.

                          I probably should have just put flex #, but I was copying Petrov's chart and I wanted to stay close to what he wrote.
                          Are you sure Becca? Flex Numbers are usually expressed in tenths and a 5.2 pole would be an iron bar (5cm (2") deflection with a 50-lb wt hanging from the middle of a horizontal pole). I'm pretty sure that's the Length of the pole (but I'm not looking at the chart).
                          5.20 was referring to the length of the pole as you had already mentioned.

                          As far as I know, all the pole manufacturers use the same span for 5.00, 5.10, and 5.20 poles. I believe Gill has a 5.20 span, but they also flex on a 5.00 span and put down both numbers. So, it doesn't really matter which 5.00+ length pole the vaulter is using, the flex numbers should be comparable.

                          You should look at the chart. 5.20 index is just the heading for the column that contains flex numbers.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by polevaultpower
                            Originally posted by tafnut
                            Originally posted by polevaultpower
                            The 5.20 index refers to the flex number of the pole, which is a measure of the stiffness of the pole.

                            I probably should have just put flex #, but I was copying Petrov's chart and I wanted to stay close to what he wrote.
                            Are you sure Becca? Flex Numbers are usually expressed in tenths and a 5.2 pole would be an iron bar (5cm (2") deflection with a 50-lb wt hanging from the middle of a horizontal pole). I'm pretty sure that's the Length of the pole (but I'm not looking at the chart).
                            5.20 was referring to the length of the pole as you had already mentioned.

                            As far as I know, all the pole manufacturers use the same span for 5.00, 5.10, and 5.20 poles. I believe Gill has a 5.20 span, but they also flex on a 5.00 span and put down both numbers. So, it doesn't really matter which 5.00+ length pole the vaulter is using, the flex numbers should be comparable.

                            You should look at the chart. 5.20 index is just the heading for the column that contains flex numbers.
                            Yes, I did know that, but always thought it odd that they would use 5.00 numbers for 5.20 (or vice versa, whichever the case may be); they also do it for shorter poles - use one length pole to get the Flex number for a pole of a different length. I would want the F# for the pole I'm using, but then again, I'm not a 6m (or 5 or 4) jumper. I guess at those dizzying heights, the flex number is the most important part of the equation.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by tafnut
                              Yes, I did know that, but always thought it odd that they would use 5.00 numbers for 5.20 (or vice versa, whichever the case may be); they also do it for shorter poles - use one length pole to get the Flex number for a pole of a different length. I would want the F# for the pole I'm using, but then again, I'm not a 6m (or 5 or 4) jumper. I guess at those dizzying heights, the flex number is the most important part of the equation.
                              As far as I know, Gill is the only one who even has spans for flexing 5.10 and 5.20 poles differently, and as far as I know, the only number the athletes care about is the flex number on a 5.00 meter span.

                              I could be wrong on both accounts, and I will note that I have no idea what Nordic does, I just assume they are similar to the U.S. Manufacturers.

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