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Indoor Track Is Dead

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  • blacklily
    replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    >It just doesn't know it yet. I'm talkin' pro
    >track here, but most collegiate indoor track &
    >field is a joke, as well. Just something to
    >fulfill the NCAA's requirements for number of
    >sports. Better to save the money being squandered
    >trying to resurrect the glory days. Stick a fork
    >in it--it's done!

    As long as there are meet sponsors & cold northern hemisphere winters, indoor track ain't dead. Did you forget the world outside USA? People in London, Brussels, or Stockholm would laugh at your statement.

    The Millrose Games, a U.S. meet, had the largest single-day attendance of any indoor meet this year (including the world indoor championships). The Tyson meet is growing, & Boston's meet sells well. In the U.S., the indoor meets' attendance are on par with outdoor meet attendance (excluding the relay carnivals).

    Could there be improvements? Certainly! More money will entice some of the biggies who currently don't run indoors. But dead? No.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    USATF Indoor Champs went over well with the fans because of the format and presentation. Trust me, while there were highlights on the elite athletes' side (Teter's 800 AR, Pate's 28 ft. LJ), who could forget Brooklyn's Boys & Girls breaking the nine minute barrier in the High School Girls 4 x 800 relay; or the stirring 4 x 4 races on both the boys and girls side?

    Even the elite athletes were rooting for the outcome.

    While indoor track may cater to the elite athletes to extent, everyone knows that its the larger base of open, high school, and collegiate athletes that make indoor track what it is.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    True, but this gives them another event for media attention and if they start and finish the races on a track they can sell tickets.

    Since it is on the road and easily accessable (unlike cross country) they may be able to get ESPN or Fox Sports to cover it.

    Shouldn't hurt the Indoor Championships any as it is mainly sprinter/field event and middle distance runner focused any way.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    Indoor track isn't dead. Unfortuantely, there are fewer elite athletes than collegiate or high school athletes competing indoors. If it wasn't for high school events supplimenting the elite meets, then indoor track would truly be dead.

    Comparing indoor track in the 1950s and '60s to now ignores the significant changes that have occurred. To have a good (or great) indoor meet boils down to presentation.

    Despite the complaints about the NYC Armory, the 2002 USATF

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  • tafnut
    replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    The NCAA is set up for the vast majority of programs who compete in meets for points - not for enhancing the American distance running program.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    Instead of Indooor Track for collegiate distance runners, how about an NCAA 1/2 Marathon (13.1 miles) Championship. Run regional qualifiers in January and a NCAA Championship in February. It'll give the 5k/10k guys something to do other than get dizzy running 50 laps around a dinky indoor track and will build a proper base for the spring outdoor season.

    This may also help us produce better marathoners.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    The 2002 Indoor USATF meet at the Armory in New York is a perfect example of current problems of indoor track.

    The meet was brought to New York from Atlanta so it could take advantage of the media exposure and local fan base. The meet itself (I attended both sessions) was very exciting with records (Teter in the 800) and fast times.

    Afterwards there was feedback that the official body didn't like the facility because of lack of warmup space and inadequate bathrooms. So the meet goes to Boston's Lewis Center for 2003 and beyond.

    I think the national body has to support professional indoor track in New York to get media exposure. You need to connect the broad H.S. participation with the professionals. NYC is the perfect site for that. All of those facilities issues are resolvable. With the Hall of Fame now complete, the National meet should come back to New York, at least on a rotating basis.

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  • MJR
    replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    Hello!!
    Buehler, Buehler...

    Did anyone who replied to this posting actually read the original message??

    I think not, as it referred to the professional end of the sport, not the hs side. Don't get your panties in a bundle, if you're not going to take the time to read things first.

    Leave a comment:


  • ndamix
    replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    If indoor track is did, then why are there at least 30 competitions a week a the Wayne Curry Sports & Learning Complex in Landover, Maryland, during the indoor season. This isn't including the hosting of the Nike Indoor Classic (one of the preemminent high school indoor competitions).

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    Come to a high school meet in the Armory in NYC next winter and see how dead the sport is! Kids can't wait to get on that track and race. A different group (hs,college, open) books that track almost every afternoon and night from early Dec. until late March. Remember those people who race there for the most part train outdoors during the brutal Northeast winters. They love to run. Let's face it Indoor Track will never be what it was in the 1950s and 1960s when the top runners in the country competed on the circuit every weekend from Jan. to March. Crowds enveloped by cigar and cigarrette smoke cheered on Ron Delany and company. We must remember that running is a recreational sport and indoor track does fill the need of many.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    Speaking of NSIC, this meet is beginning to attract youngsters from outside the US as well such as Jamaica and Canada.

    Leave a comment:


  • ht30
    replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    I don't imagine all the high schoolers looking forward to Simplot would believe indoor track is dead, either.

    Leave a comment:


  • waynehobley
    replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    Any dont forget about NSIC which is the most popular high school meets in the nation.

    Leave a comment:


  • tafnut
    replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    Inddor track is alive and well, as long as northern US and northern Europe have winters. It's not supposed to be an 'indoor' outdoor meet; it really is quite different and it's very enjoyable as is. A Millrose meet is as good as any US outdoor invitational, just different.

    Leave a comment:


  • joel
    replied
    Re: Indoor Track Is Dead

    Come January, as a fan who hasn't seen a track meet in 4 months, there is an air of anticipation that tells me indoor track most certainly is NOT dead.
    Boston, Millrose, Stuttgart, even Virginia Tech... I'm not sure what makes you think it's dead.

    Leave a comment:

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