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    bob hayes at the 64 olympics in the 4x100m relay who ran anhor leg was clocked at running 35 mph for about 1 to 2 seconds of the race the reason for such a high speed is it was the fastest relay split time in history at 8.6 ben johnson was clocked at running 31 mph at the 100m final in seoul even though ben johnson was caught with drugs in his system it never done anything to his performance it just allowed him to train better and harder for longer so when he got out on track he was better equipped michael johnson was clocked running 33 mph at one point of his race at the olympic 200m final where he smashed the world record the fastest speed maurice greene has reached is 28.87 mph nearly 29 mph.

  • #2
    Re: speed

    Curt, should I call you Maurice Green? We did this thread before you got pulled off the board. Shouldn't you be quiet for a while?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: speed

      i am sorry for what i done yesterday for pretending to be maurice greene i dont know why i done it it was a stupid thing to do i promise i wont pretend to be anyone else except my self all i ask you is for one more chance and i wont screw up again

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: speed

        Have you tried this forum? It may be better suited to what you are looking for.

        http://www.letsrun.com/forum/forum.php?board=1

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: speed

          Curt, yesterday they bounced you for stupidity, now you're enroute to getting kicked for sheer depth of bullshit. Where the hell did you get all those numbers you're making up? Off a dartboard? Nobody has ever run over 30mph (or even close to it far as I know)

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: speed

            i like this messege board but thanks for the info on the other message board

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: speed

              >bob hayes at the 64 olympics in the 4x100m relay
              >who ran anhor leg was clocked at running 35 mph
              >for about 1 to 2 seconds of the race the reason
              >for such a high speed is it was the fastest relay
              >split time in history at 8.6 ben johnson was
              >clocked at running 31 mph at the 100m final in
              >seoul even though ben johnson was caught with
              >drugs in his system it never done anything to his
              >performance it just allowed him to train better
              >and harder for longer so when he got out on track
              >he was better equipped michael johnson was
              >clocked running 33 mph at one point of his race
              >at the olympic 200m final where he smashed the
              >world record the fastest speed maurice greene has
              >reached is 28.87 mph nearly 29 mph.


              Regarding your question about Top Speeds, I have found this from the archives of the IAAF Forums (Champions Corner forum): It comes from a French Statistician, Pierrejean.

              ''Pierrejean has compiled a list of the best ever speeds measured''

              Top Speeds of which human beings have achieved

              (Men)

              28mph(12.51m/s), by Carl Lewis in Los Angeles 1984 OG final won in 9.99s. That was the speed mesured by Swiss Timing for his last 2 meters. The accuracy is mediocre! (source Track & Field News October 1984)

              44.88km/h (12.47m/s), by Bob Hayes in 21 June 1963 during his 9.1sWR for 100y. He was hand-timed at 60y in 6.0s and at 75y in 7.1s, worth 1.1s for 15y. This is a catastrophic accuracy... For that same race, PJ has found 2 other speeds: 43.5km/h (12.08m/s) and 43.291km/h (12.02m/s) but PJ doesn't know what has changed in the measurment... (source Quid annuals)

              0.81s, for a 10m section which is worth 12.34m/s between 60m and 70m by Ben Johnson in Zürich'85, in a 10.03s race. This is from a video analyse made by his coach Charlie Francis. PJ says whilst viewing the video, it is one of the most incredible races that he has seen, his acceleration at the mid-race was enourmous, and he stopped running 10m before the line(recording a 1.00s last 10m Split! When he was in shape to run the last 10m in around 0.84-0.87s!), missing probably the then-9.93sWR. PJ does not know much about the accuracy of the 0.81s for Ben found by Charlie.

              12.1m/s, by Ato Boldon (in semi-final) and Donovan Bailey (final) in Atlanta'96 OG according Swatch Timing with the Laveg system. The accuracy again is not great as it doesn't permit to have one centimeter(cm) precision. (source La Fabuleuse Histoire De L'Athlétisme, R.Parienté)

              0.83s for a 10m section worth 12.05m/s, by Carl Lewis and Ben Johnson in Seoul'88, also by Lewis in Tokyo'91 by Donovan Bailey in Atlanta'96 according IAAF scientific studies (source Biomechanical Research Project Athens 1997). PJ has found also 0.83s from his Video Analsyis, for Tim Montgomery during his 9.78s 100m WR.

              11.95m/s, by Tommie Smith during his 19.5 straight 220y WR in 1966. His last 20y was timed in 1.53. (source; 200m et 220y Temps Automatiques 1932-1982,
              J-C.Patinaud)

              11.91m/s, by Donovan Bailey in Athens 1997 4x100m final during his 8.94 anchor leg.
              Maurice Greene and Bailey reached 11.87m/s during the 100m final. These are instantaneous running speeds measured by a laser system Laveg, more accurate than in Atlanta, finding the distance each runner covers in every 0.2s(1/5th of a second).

              11.90m/s, by Jonathan Edwards (!) for his run-up speed 1-6m to the board from the biomechanical study of his 18.29 Triple Jump WR in Göteborg'95 made by Leif Dahlberg (source Track stats November 1995). Dahlberg found also that Wellman ran at 11.63m/s.
              Jumpers are trained to reach a maximum speed very early and in a very short time. But they are unable to maintain it long enough to run at the same level than the 100m sprinters.

              Actually, some coaches like John Smith think that running 5 consecutive 10m sections in 0.85s is better than peaking at 0.83s and losing your speed until the finish line. Greene probably ran close to 0.83s for a 10m Split, but it is not his goal, he wants to run the best final 100m time possible, not the fastest maximum speed.

              Once again these are not my words. But those of Pierrejean.
              Who has posted many replies over at the 'Historical Events' Forums.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: speed

                i am not talking bullshit i dont talk crap i got those figures from a statician for your information those speeds are achiveble just think about it 8.6 for 100m 19.32 for 200m and 9.79 for 100m they are very fast times and each athlete that i mentioned only hit that speed for about a second or 2 thats the speed they hit when they hit there maximum speed

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: speed

                  The .83 for Lewis is the fastest reliable speed ever achieved. That is UNDER 30mph. The rest is hype.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: speed

                    I have never seen official (and accurately) measured speeds above 12m/s. The only splits I believe are from the LAVEG measurements recorded at the 1997 WC, where the top speeds for Greene and Bailey were 11.91m/s.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: speed

                      All of the velocities mentioned by Curt are nonsense... nobody in the history of the planet has even approached 28 mph, let alone 35

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: speed

                        About 35 years ago an article appeared in a running magazine about tow training. A bar above and parallel to the trunk of a car was fitted to the back bumper of a car. By gripping this bar by both hands one could be towed by the car. The car would slowly accelerate. Most of the high school kids could handle 25 MPH. The only kids who could hang on above 30 MPH were those who could run around 10 flat for a 100 yards. I was a 50 sec 440 runner. I could remember how hard it was to pick up and put down my legs to keep from being dragged. It was amazing. At the end of the straight the driver would honk the horn. The runner would let go and start to vigorously pump his arms to regain total balance. The AD of our school thought that this was interesting. Can you imagine the liability if one was to attempt this stunt now. Anyway it was interesting to get the feeling of moving one's legs that fast.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: speed

                          A similar effect is achieved by running full speed down a hill, but the falls are spectacular. There are also rubber bands (for lack of a better term) that one harnesses oneself into and stretches for a really fast start.

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                          • #14
                            Re: speed

                            >bob hayes at the 64 olympics in the 4x100m relay
                            >who ran anhor leg was clocked at running 35 mph
                            >for about 1 to 2 seconds of the race the reason
                            >for such a high speed is it was the fastest relay
                            >split time in history at 8.6>>

                            Sorry Curt, but Hayes's split wasn't 8.6,it was 8.9. Huge difference there.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: speed

                              Actually Hayes' leg was 8.6s.
                              That was the 'agreed' average time for the several estimates between 8.4-8.9s for his anchor leg.

                              But nevertheless it was fast for 1964, and it still is.

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