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  • Kenyan Backlash

    The NY media was unhappy with the NYM results and it got pretty heavy -some may say racist- on MSNBC this morning.

    There is no question that the road scene is being hurt by the "unknown africans" and it's only going to get worse.

    With no US runners able to take up the challange and the '80's running boom behind us you really have to wonder when sponcers $$ will dry up. Unless, the inevitable occurs: US races for US runners .

  • #2
    Re: Kenyan Backlash

    US marathoning had a very bad year, which is a shame since things were looking up the last few years.
    The truth is a 2:11 - 2:15 marathon runner is just not going to be competitive anymore on the international scene.
    American runners just do not train hard enough. They are getting creamed not by just by the Kenyan but also some European runners.

    If things continue to get worse the US may have to import some African talent. There is really no choice now.

    The world championships this year was a disaster for US distance running.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Kenyan Backlash

      it was noted in yesterday's broadcast that elly rono has applied for u.s. citizenship.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Kenyan Backlash

        Another sad truth...The American public's not gonna care for imported talent, either.

        I know that is a harsh thing to say, but if the American public has a hard time relating to American-born athletes, what makes you think they will relate to the imported ones?

        Cases in point: Did the American public care much for 1993 World Champ Mark Platjes running as an American? (ABC sure didn't!!!!!). Does the American public care at the moment for Khalid Khanouchi?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Kenyan Backlash

          >Another sad truth...The American public's not
          >gonna care for imported talent, either.

          I
          >know that is a harsh thing to say, but if the
          >American public has a hard time relating to
          >American-born athletes, what makes you think they
          >will relate to the imported ones?

          Cases in
          >point: Did the American public care much for 1993
          >World Champ Mark Platjes running as an American?
          >(ABC sure didn't!!!!!). Does the American public
          >care at the moment for Khalid Khanouchi?>

          The fact of the matter is that in the US there are two marathons if you want the public to know who you are. Neither of those are Chicago. Let Khanouchi win Boston or New York before passing judgements on the 'imports'.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Kenyan Backlash

            certainly no less than the american public cared for steve spence's w.c. bronze in 1991. seems to not matter whether our best distance runners are "home-grown" or not in terms of translating to national notice.

            Comment


            • #7
              "migrated" not "imported"!

              also, "imported" is about the least accurate (and probably most demeaning) term to choose to apply here; no one brought them (or their family) here, they came on their own volition - they "migrated".

              Comment


              • #8
                Re:

                Actually, this is a secret plan put in plan by the United Nations, designed to bolster the faltering Kenyan economy without appearing to be a handout.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Kenyan Backlash

                  The truth is a 2:11 - 2:15 marathon
                  >runner is just not going to be competitive
                  >anymore on the international scene.


                  the truth, is if any American ran between 2:11-2:15 yesterday, they would have been top 10. That would be competitive. Unfortunately the ones that can run that were not there yesterday.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Kenyan Backlash

                    Let the Kenyans run... learn from them and enjoy. On the other hand, Marathons like NY, should also give money to American runners (separately). Like the first 10 American men and 10 first American women. Then they may come.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Kenyan Backlash

                      I think a few foreign transplants would help US distance running like it did in the past. As Spivey said it forced his generation of runners to be faster. Sydney Maree (3:48.83) certainly helped many US college milers run faster. I know US runners would complain if foreign runners took their position on the national team, but then again if you qualify with a either a 13:30 5000 meters or a 3:39 1500 meters you are not going to do much in international competition anyway.

                      Right now US distance runners are not much faster than they were 30 years ago.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Kenyan Backlash

                        I don't really see the benefit to American distance running of offering seperate prize money to the top ten American Citizens. What is it really saying? Is it helping to bridge the gap to the Kenyans?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Kenyan Backlash

                          The same situation arises in most sports where one country is clearly dominant for a period of time. Gymnastics, cross country skiing, diving the list goes on. Looking at those dominant countries with awe and trying to emulate everything they do is a mistake. The reason they can do such and such training is because they are already better. If another nation tries to copy them they might self destruct. I know cross country skiing took on this battle for many years and I see alot of similarities to the current distance running situation. Athletes were devestated, everything was crumbling. They were too good. Now I wouldn't say the roles are reversed but other nations are learning and doing very well.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Kenyan Backlash

                            Friar, I think your concern on sponsor $$ drying up is disproven by the new $1 mil marathon ranking prize by ING. I think sponsors do not care about nationalities of the winners, as long as their product is receiving good press they will continue sponsoring races.

                            There is still a very competitive nature between race organizers for the best race, so I'm sure they will find sponsors for many years to come.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Kenyan Backlash

                              I propose a sport that clearly we can be number one
                              in: sore losing. Nobody can spill vitriol and bile over not being able to compete like we can.

                              Here's one solution to our problem, probably the
                              only solution: find a sport that only we're in-
                              terested in ( like hockey, or rock climbing ), that would guarantee that one of us would always win!
                              We would then be able to do another thing that we
                              do best: appreciating only our achievement and
                              totally disrespecting and dishonoring the achieve-
                              ments of others.

                              Comment

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