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The Long Green Line and Joe Newton

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  • The Long Green Line and Joe Newton

    http://www.longgreenlinemovie.com/

    What's the story with this movie/documentary. Anyone heard of it?

  • #2
    Re: The Long Green Line and Joe Newton

    Originally posted by Daisy
    http://www.longgreenlinemovie.com/

    What's the story with this movie/documentary. Anyone heard of it?
    It's not out yet. Coincidentally, a few years ago two friends of mine had the same idea. They wanted to raise money and make the documentary themselves. I thought it was a great idea, but neither of my friends knew anything about the film industry at all, and without hesitation I told them they were dreaming and should forget the idea.

    When I found out about the movie a couple of weeks ago I forwarded that link to them. I'm glad someone came to the same conclusion as my friends, and grateful they had the skills to actually act on their vision. As far as drama goes, who could expect that two of Newton's kids would get arrested for burning down homes under construction during the filming?

    I will purchase this movie without a doubt. If it makes it to a theatre, I will go see it. Joe Newton reminds me of my high school coach -- a supreme motivator. The sport needs more of him.

    Comment


    • #3
      Pretty much every high school coach needs to watch this movie. Probably most college coaches too!

      200 kids running XC?! that's just unheard of! And they come because of him, not because they'll all be great. Many of them KNOW they wont be great, or ever make varsity, but they come anyway. Unreal.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: The Long Green Line and Joe Newton

        Originally posted by malmo
        Originally posted by Daisy
        http://www.longgreenlinemovie.com/

        What's the story with this movie/documentary. Anyone heard of it?
        It's not out yet. Coincidentally, a few years ago two friends of mine had the same idea. They wanted to raise money and make the documentary themselves. I thought it was a great idea, but neither of my friends knew anything about the film industry at all, and without hesitation I told them they were dreaming and should forget the idea.

        When I found out about the movie a couple of weeks ago I forwarded that link to them. I'm glad someone came to the same conclusion as my friends, and grateful they had the skills to actually act on their vision. As far as drama goes, who could expect that two of Newton's kids would get arrested for burning down homes under construction during the filming?

        I will purchase this movie without a doubt. If it makes it to a theatre, I will go see it. Joe Newton reminds me of my high school coach -- a supreme motivator. The sport needs more of him.
        Malmo, your HS coach may have been like Newton, but you should be thankful you didn't run at York. Your running career would have been much shorter.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: The Long Green Line and Joe Newton

          Originally posted by Conor Dary
          you should be thankful you didn't run at York. Your running career would have been much shorter.
          What kind of mileage are you talking about?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: The Long Green Line and Joe Newton

            Originally posted by Daisy
            Originally posted by Conor Dary
            you should be thankful you didn't run at York. Your running career would have been much shorter.
            What kind of mileage are you talking about?
            A Lot!

            Comment


            • #7
              if you know anything about malmo...high mileage was never a problem for him.

              Comment


              • #8
                Very interesting that so many people criticize newton for his training methods and say that his athletes dont improve a tremendous amount after high school. With that many great high school runners coming from one school, it begs the question whether the coaching they got in high school just allowed them to reach full potential much faster than at other schools. If a runner goes 4:25 in high school and then runs 4:04 in college, it is usually credited to the coaching and training regiment. When a runner goes 4:06 in high school and then only 4:02 in college, they are a disappointment. Well maybe they just ran to almost their full potential in high school.

                Comment


                • #9
                  This is the third time I have been sucked into this Newton sinkhole on this board.
                  So here we go again....

                  I have known Joe Newton since I started running back in the late 60's. His house was about a half mile from where I grew up and our high school team regularly got pummeled on a regular basis by York Dukes. He is a great guy and very inspirational. I ran over 1000 miles each summer primarily because of reading the 'Long Green Line', and during the school year I regularly ran 100 miles a week.

                  However, I am glad I didn't run at York. No one from that era went on to anything, and the former Dukes I have met from that era quit running, and in one special case, became very out of shape. Obese is more like it.

                  Meanwhile, I and a large number of my old teammates still run today.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You deffiantely have known more dukes from longer back than me, but I just look at the number of people who ran on high school teams who continue running later and the percentage is probably not very high where ever you go. My two roommates in college were very successful dukes and ran on some of the teams considered to be among the best in the history of high school XC and they have nothing but respect and admiration for coach newton and what he has done for the sport and the athletes he has coached, and I think as a high school coach, that is his true responsibility, not to create lifelong runners or college phenoms, but excellent men. And that was quite a run-on sentence.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I suspect that Newton got "everything" out his runners during their 4 years in HS--leaving essentially nothing for future years. Maybe not a bad thing--all in all--but definitely not our "ideal" scenario for the development of an athlete from young teenage years into adulthood...

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                      • #12
                        No one...and I mean no one reaches their peak running by the time they graduate HS. Even if you stay on the exact same regimen for the rest of the next decade, physical maturity will make you run better. I am sure he gets them to meet their potential for their age, but making them reach their complete potential - very doubtful

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ponytayne
                          No one...and I mean no one reaches their peak running by the time they graduate HS. Even if you stay on the exact same regimen for the rest of the next decade, physical maturity will make you run better. I am sure he gets them to meet their potential for their age, but making them reach their complete potential - very doubtful
                          There are two components here: physical & mental. If either one is used up, the other is not of much use.

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                          • #14
                            ooh kuha, I like the way you put that. Just because you put up good times at an early age does not mean you have the desire to give the dedication to be world class. Also, certain people run well in certain coaching environments. Ive seen incredible distance runners come out of michigan for quite a while, but did it work perfectly for Alan Webb?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: The Long Green Line and Joe Newton

                              Originally posted by Conor Dary
                              Malmo, your HS coach may have been like Newton, but you should be thankful you didn't run at York. Your running career would have been much shorter.
                              I'm a 100 percent certain you are incorrect.

                              Comment

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