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Rynell Parson Mystery Solved

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  • Rynell Parson Mystery Solved

    Concerns about his asthma medication leading to a positive drug test led to the decision not to run him at Pan-Am.

    http://tinyurl.com/2k6w7n
    There are no strings on me

  • #2
    That's good and bad news. Good that they had that much foresight, bad that someone with a legitimate need for medication loses out on a great opportunity because of it. It still frosts me that meds like ADD pills get people in trouble.

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    • #3
      Yeah, a tremendous success for anti-doping. Well done everyone. After all, 16-yr olds with asthma represent a real threat to the integrity of the sport. This is what happens when everyone (including many of the 'burn the witch' types on these boards) completely loses their sense of perspective over an issue.

      IMHO!

      Justin

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      • #4
        That wasn:t much different than, say: http://mb.trackandfieldnews.com/discuss ... hp?t=26796 just a few threads down?

        :-)

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        • #5
          D'OH!! ops:

          Sorry E. I swear I looked up and down for an existing thread. Somehow missed yours.
          There are no strings on me

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          • #6
            I like yours better :lol:

            (Just snipped it so we don:t have two).

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            • #7
              So, what you're saying is Parson dodged a drug test just like the Greeks?




              I kid.

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              • #8
                I thought this thread was going to be about his wristbands.

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                • #9
                  He should give them back - Mel Lattany must be worried where they've gone.

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                  • #10
                    someone help, what exactly is the compound/component in these asthma drugs that is of concern here as a performance enhancer and why?.. if a drug does not enhance performance / training levels why is it banned?
                    ... nothing really ever changes my friend, new lines for old, new lines for old.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by paulthefan
                      someone help, what exactly is the compound/component in these asthma drugs that is of concern here as a performance enhancer and why?.. if a drug does not enhance performance / training levels why is it banned?
                      I have taken a number of different medications for asthma since I developed the problem in my 30s. Meds taken orally would not seem to be a problem. I think it's the inhalants that cause the difficulties. Some (most?) inhalants may qualify as stimulants, although I think that's a bogus claim. Other inhalants contain steroids. But the steroid content is very low compared to the sort that are ingested or injected by true drug abusers. Steroid treatment is pretty rare today; there are more effective medications available for most people.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by paulthefan
                        someone help, what exactly is the compound/component in these asthma drugs that is of concern here as a performance enhancer and why?.. if a drug does not enhance performance / training levels why is it banned?
                        As a temporary answer until our resident MDs weigh in, as I understand it the problem is this: asthma drugs open breathing passages. Obviously essential for an asthmatic. For the non-afflicted, as I understand it hte line of thinking is that it artifically increases air (i.e., oxygen) flow. Ergo, that makes it a performance-enhancer.

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                        • #13
                          Salbutamol, salmeterol and trebutaline are permitted by inhaler to treat asthma as well as exercised-induced asthma.

                          However, a declaration verifying medical necessity should be provided to the U.S. Olympic Committee in advance of competition. The use of prednisone is not permitted, and none of these substances may be taken orally or by injection.


                          http://www.drugfreesport.org.nz/site/dr ... 0Guide.pdf
                          There are no strings on me

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                          • #14
                            For an athlete of his age, I can understand that neither he nor his coach may understand the process for getting clearance in time for the competition. However, if his talent is as promising as it seems, they should both get started on a little homework.

                            I read in USA Today, sometime last year, that doctors seemed surprised at the number of world class athletes who seemed to have asthma problems (they cited a study of around one third of tested athletes). Whether they really do enhance performance or not, it seems that a few out there are betting on the come that they do.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Kevin Richardson
                              I read in USA Today, sometime last year, that doctors seemed surprised at the number of world class athletes who seemed to have asthma problems (they cited a study of around one third of tested athletes). Whether they really do enhance performance or not, it seems that a few out there are betting on the come that they do.
                              As I mentioned earlier, I was diagnosed with asthma in my mid-30s. As it happened, this was the point in my life when I was no longer satisfied being a "jogger" and began to train seriously for road racing. (The time was the mid-1970s -- I was one of many.) Maybe this was all coincidence. Maybe I would have become asthmatic even if I had continued to chug along at 9 min/M.

                              Also, I have always had difficulty with the types of allergies (grass, trees, mold, etc.) that are often linked to asthma. This, along with training of 50+ miles/wk at a 7 minute pace (plus some modest speedwork), could have tipped the balance far enough to make me asthmatic. (I was hospitalized 3 times.)

                              Since the end of my humble competitive career (asthma was not the cause) I have experienced very few asthmatic episodes. I continue to take Singulair orally, Allegra for allergies, and have albuterol inhalant handy "just in case."

                              My point being that strenuous physical training may potentially induce asthma in some people who might otherwise be asthma-free.

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