Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Discus Technique Question: Spin v. East German

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Discus Technique Question: Spin v. East German

    I think the East German "stop upon release" technique (release it and not complete the reverse) is so beautiful. Especially when watching the great Lars Riedel do it (it's nice to have the look of a 6-7 stud, too!!!).

    How come US disc throwers and coaches never experiment with the East German technique? Is it that difficult to master? How many other coaches (other than the Germans) use this technique? I've seen at least one Greek woman use it.

  • #2
    Re: Discus Technique Question: Spin v. East German

    Who cares. Discus is boring.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Discus Technique Question: Spin v. East German

      Enter the word "reverse" in the search window and you'll find multiple loooong threads on this topic from a couple of months back.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Discus Technique Question: Spin v. East German

        Take no note of that first comment. I personally am a big fan of the discus and am wondring the answer to your question as well

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Discus Technique Question: Spin v. East German

          >Who cares. Discus is boring.

          Not at Walnut it isn't. I'm appalled at the lack of safety there, seems only a matter of time before a long/triple jumper gets nailed. Saw Carl Lewis legging it away from one once. Seriously though, have you ever tried it? It's incredibly difficult, discus throwers are fantastic athletes.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Discus Technique Question: Spin v. East German

            As a throws coach and someone who threw the discus for a number of years, I can tell you that I favor the "reverse" at the end of the throw as it is far easier, and I believe biomechanically more sound, to allow the throwing side of the body to follow through and around after the release of the discus. I can tell immediately that the poster of this question has had absolutely no experience in the discus. The "Eastern European" technique as favored by some camps is best executed by VERY TALL and POWERFUL athletes as a non-reverse style of throwing requires the thrower to be able to CHECK his rotational momentum completely at the front of the ring. This is, I repeat, UNNATURAL! It has been done with great success ONLY by the aforementioned VERY TALL and POWERFUL throwers. A reverse-style technique is NATURAL and gives throwers of a smaller stature (6'-6'2") the ability to compete against taller throwers. Al Oerter would back me up on this one as I've heard him asked about this very same line of questioning. Just watch Virgilius Alekna sometime. He is the prototypical 250' thrower being 2m tall and using the reverse (follow-thru) technique.

            I hope this gives you some idea on the differences. However, unless you actually have experience throwing, it is difficult form most to understand just how natural it is to "follow-thru" at the end of the throw.

            Kurt Francis
            Throws Coach, Willmington College, OH

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Discus Technique Question: Spin v. East German

              Oh lord - don't get this started again. It was of the most mean-spirited threads ever.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Discus Technique Question: Spin v. East German

                I must've missed that particular thread...as bad as the drug issue?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Discus Technique Question: Spin v. East German

                  It got personal and one poster in particular thought he had all the answers and everyone who disagreed was just plain wrong.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Discus Technique Question: Spin v. East German

                    >As a throws coach and someone who threw the discus for a number of years, I can
                    >tell you that I favor the "reverse" at the end of the throw as it is far
                    >easier, and I believe biomechanically more sound, to allow the throwing side of
                    >the body to follow through and around after the release of the discus. I can
                    >tell immediately that the poster of this question has had absolutely no
                    >experience in the discus. The "Eastern European" technique as favored by
                    >some camps is best executed by VERY TALL and POWERFUL athletes as a non-reverse
                    >style of throwing requires the thrower to be able to CHECK his rotational
                    >momentum completely at the front of the ring. This is, I repeat, UNNATURAL!
                    >It has been done with great success ONLY by the aforementioned VERY TALL and
                    >POWERFUL throwers. A reverse-style technique is NATURAL and gives throwers of
                    >a smaller stature (6'-6'2") the ability to compete against taller throwers.
                    >Al Oerter would back me up on this one as I've heard him asked about this
                    >is very same line of questioning. Just watch Virgilius Alekna sometime. He is
                    >the prototypical 250' thrower being 2m tall and using the reverse (follow-thru)
                    >technique.

                    I hope this gives you some idea on the differences. However,
                    >unless you actually have experience throwing, it is difficult form most to
                    >understand just how natural it is to "follow-thru" at the end of the
                    >throw.

                    Kurt Francis
                    Throws Coach, Willmington College, OH


                    Correct, that I am not a discus thrower. So yes, I do not have discus experience. And I do appeciate the comments.

                    This thread was not meant to be mean-spirited. I did not know that there was previous discussion on the topic, and did not know that discussions of the two techniques were very controversial. As a fan of the discus, I've seen Lars Reidel many times, and his German technique is just superb! I also was a fan of a thrower named Tony Washington (World Champ gold, 1999), a "reverse" thower whose technique was impressive as well.
                    I only asked the question because not many use the East German technique. Never meant to rub anyone the wrong way. Peace!

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X