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  • #16
    Originally posted by Chetanji
    By the time Indoor senior year came I was working out alone on the track. I had someone time me or I carried the stopwatch.
    I did the best I could, and I blame no one for my problems.
    I think any one who has a great Coach that motivates ,.....as well as knows how to take each individual higher,..... and (this was important for me) to be a Father when needed is indeed a very rare person.
    Well said. The amount of time spent praising the good coaches in places like this is miniscule compared to the time spent tearing down those coaches seen as bad. I have no doubt as to which type of person the naysayers were on teams I've been on.

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    • #17
      A good coach will instill trust in his athletes. He will also educate the athletes as to the "why's" and not just tell them "do it" with no explanation.

      In this sport there must be so much communication. Coaches don't know how kids are feeling. If a kid isn't feeling good he must tell his coach and the coach must listen so the workout can be adjusted. It is the same with injury. Unusual aches and pains should be reported so proactive treatment can begin to prevent if from becoming more serious.

      If kids understand the WHY of running easy, and they trust their coach, they will run easy as instructed. If they don't understand or trust they may go on self-destruct mode.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by KevinM
        Give me a break. Do you think a "good" coach is out on the roads for every "easy" day?
        Of course not. But we had a coach who would drive around to keep a pretty good eye on us. Could he do it all the time? No. Also, my statement's emphasis is on on his watch. What an athlete did after practice the coach cannot control. What he did on the track was right in front of the coach.

        [quote:2u05ihck]If a guy wants to be self-destructive, he'll be self-destructive, no matter the coach
        But not during practice.

        Coaches are accorded WAY too much influence in the minds of many here. The ultimate choice to improve and compete is on the athlete, not on any second party.
        [/quote:2u05ihck]

        I'm not hearing on this thread or the "Inept Coaches" thread anything suggesting that the athletes on these forums didn't want to improve and run hard.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by KevinM
          I suspect they're the same ones who only come to athletics message boards to tear down various athletes and coaches.
          Just wanna make sure i didnt give that impression. I loved my coach. He was tough but fair. I couldnt have found a better one. When he was inducted into the San Mateo County hall of fame along with Matt Guisto i flew 6000 miles to be there and give him a hug. Sadly he was suffering from Alzheimers. :cry:
          phsstt!

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          • #20
            I just got an email that mentioned Joe Lang is being inducted into Georgetown University's Hall of Fame this weekend.
            He was my coach in College and tried very hard with everyone to give them his time. He was an excellent example of the "selfless coach".
            God Bless Ya Joe!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by KevinM
              Coaches are accorded WAY too much influence in the minds of many here. The ultimate choice to improve and compete is on the athlete, not on any second party.
              Your second statement is totally unrelated to the first. Some coaches do make all the difference in the world to an athlete, and some athletes don't care who their coach is. None of my coaches made any difference to me because I felt there was no connection. They were just coaching a group of athletes and no differentiation was made among us. Even if there had been, it wouldn't have made much difference to me because no coach could have matched or inflamed me desire to get better any more than I already did. On the other hand, there were some athletes that needed encouragement and got little, so they stayed mediocre. On the third (??) hand, I see kids whose coaches take a personal interest in their welfare and success, and these kids blossom under the tutelege. Which is not to say some of the athletes would not have succeeded anyway with a non-caring coach. It all depends on the athlete and the coach. But to say that too much influence is being accorded coaches can be completely wrong. Sometimes a coach does make all the difference.

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              • #22
                Marlow, welcome and nice post, hopefully you'll post regularly.

                I think this works in education too. When I went to we had tutorials with a professor and about six students. I made stronger connections with these professors compared to the those that I saw only in lecture, regardless of how good the lectures were. i think it boils down to the difference between one way communication compared to two way communication.

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                • #23
                  Marlow,
                  Thanks for making the connection between competition and test taking. That is a correlation I always tried to make with my athletes. They could take lessons (day to day preparation, discipline, listening,confidence, calmness ) learned in one area, and apply them to the other.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by bekeselassie
                    Originally posted by KevinM
                    Give me a break. Do you think a "good" coach is out on the roads for every "easy" day?
                    Of course not. But we had a coach who would drive around to keep a pretty good eye on us. Could he do it all the time? No. Also, my statement's emphasis is on on his watch. What an athlete did after practice the coach cannot control. What he did on the track was right in front of the coach.
                    Ours didn:t. Never would "on his watch". We ran in the hills on "easy days". As long as we were fresh for the hard days workload, that.s what mattered to him. Supposed to run 72:s and hit 66:s? BFD. He:d make our next set 65:s and watch us run 63:s. He:d change the final set to 60:s and watch a guy like future USA OT 1.500m runner-up (and eventual Masters WR-holder) close out in 55. Did he lose control of the workout? Hardly. There were so many underlying lessons learned in that type of game we played. LSD? 20km in the hills at 5.45 pace on "easy days", sometimes closing in 4.40 the final mile... then 1.600m of non-stop strides in 4.50... stretch and weights.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by SQUACKEE
                      Originally posted by KevinM
                      I suspect they're the same ones who only come to athletics message boards to tear down various athletes and coaches.
                      Just wanna make sure i didnt give that impression. I loved my coach. He was tough but fair. I couldnt have found a better one.
                      I dissed two coaches on the "inept" thread, so should praise the guy we had before them. Bobby Ball coached us when I was 7th grade track and 8th grade xc and track (7th -12th in one school and on one team.) I recall he was a state champ hurdler ten years earlier and may have run for Western Kentucky. He was outgoing, confident, treated us well, and had a great sense of humor. He even was a pretty good distance coach, coming from a hurdles background. Things were fun with him, even with all the pain and when things didn't go as well as hoped for. My junior year one the seniors I had run with since 7th grade wrote in my yearbook, "Remember the rowdy days with Coach Ball." Yes indeed.

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