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┬ÂmHigh Jump--Dusty Jonas (Nebraska) 7-7 (2.31) CL

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Dietmar239
    Originally posted by tandfman
    Originally posted by paulthefan
    question, who is the most talented american jumper of the last 20 years?, 30 years and how does a Jonas compare?
    The most talented American jumpers of the past 20 and 30 years were probably Hollis Conway and Charles Austin. I don't see Jonas in their league. Andra Manson has the potential, I think, and Scott Sellers may, too.
    The high jump is a fickle woman. Your Conway's and Austin's are extremely rare in this country. There were a ton of great second tier jumpers that I would rank with Manson, Sellers, and Jonas. Jumpers like Hemmingway, Nieto, Plab, Smith (Il. State), Brown, Nordquist, Howard, Carter, McCants, Edwards, Jacoby and the list goes on. All of these guys were quality jumpers, but none of them truly dominated their event. I think you've got to put up at least a 7'10" jump and win some WCH or Olympic medals to be considered in the same league with the big two.
    I agree with that. I said only that I thought Manson and Sellers have the potential to do that. (I'm not quite as convinced about Jonas.) Almost all of the others you've mentioned have no more potential because they have finished their careers. Nieto is still jumping but probably won't ever go much higher than he's already gone.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by paulthefan
      question, who is the most talented american jumper of the last 20 years?, 30 years and how does a Jonas compare?
      Tyke Peacock certainly left a big impression on me in his limited career

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      • #33
        If youre going pack to tyke peacock, then ill say gail olsen, the reason peacock only one one state championship in high school. Injuries took out his career way too soon... so he just jumped 7'3 off his other leg to finish out.

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        • #34
          What about Charlie Clinger of a few years ago. Jumped 2.35 (7-8 1/2) . Suddenly he was gone. What happened? Did he get too big? I think he was 6-9, even taller than Freitag.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Per Andersen
            What about Charlie Clinger of a few years ago. Jumped 2.35 (7-8 1/2) . Suddenly he was gone. What happened? Did he get too big? I think he was 6-9, even taller than Freitag.
            something unimpressive about a guy 6'6+ winning a HJ competition... reminds me of the very typical winner of an NBA dunk contest, usually some fellow 6'5"+ with less than impressive vertical and arms down to his knees.... give me a d. brown or a spud webb any day!
            ... nothing really ever changes my friend, new lines for old, new lines for old.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Dietmar239
              The high jump is a fickle woman. Your Conway's and Austin's are extremely rare in this country. There were a ton of great second tier jumpers that I would rank with Manson, Sellers, and Jonas. Jumpers like Hemmingway, Nieto, Plab, Smith (Il. State), Brown, Nordquist, Howard, Carter, McCants, Edwards, Jacoby and the list goes on. All of these guys were quality jumpers, but none of them truly dominated their event. I think you've got to put up at least a 7'10" jump and win some WCH or Olympic medals to be considered in the same league with the big two.
              I agree. Nobody else is in Conway and Austin's league and I'm not at all sold on either Sellers or Manson.

              (Jonas: literally the only thing I know about him is seeing one jump and one refusal on TV! He shouldn't even be discussed with any of the other guys in this context, yet).

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              • #37
                I've heard some HJ top dawgs talk about how under developed Clinger was and that he didnt have a lot of support from some close to him.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by paulthefan
                  Originally posted by Per Andersen
                  What about Charlie Clinger of a few years ago. Jumped 2.35 (7-8 1/2) . Suddenly he was gone. What happened? Did he get too big? I think he was 6-9, even taller than Freitag.
                  something unimpressive about a guy 6'6+ winning a HJ competition... reminds me of the very typical winner of an NBA dunk contest, usually some fellow 6'5"+ with less than impressive vertical and arms down to his knees.... give me a d. brown or a spud webb any day!
                  I think that height matters much more for women HJs than for men. Yes, there are not too many 5'5" guys, but there are not in all of the non-distance events.

                  Since there are not many 7 foot tall jumpers, I would assume that the height advantage goes away well before that (or all of the 7' tall 7'+ jumpers are in the NBA).

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by 26mi235

                    Since there are not many 7 foot tall jumpers, I would assume that the height advantage goes away well before that (or all of the 7' tall 7'+ jumpers are in the NBA).
                    I agree. I don't think there is any specific advantage to be over 6-5 or 6-6.
                    Since an effective jump requires a good deal of gymnastic ability extremely tall jumpers can have more problems technically.

                    I also I feel Holm's disadvantage of being only 5-11 1/4 might be a bit less than I used to think. As far as I know he has never had ankle problems problems and nobody at this time seems so smooth and perfectly balanced going through his curve and into the take off.

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