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Why doesn't Jeremy Wariner run indoors?

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  • #16
    Re: Why doesn't Jeremy Wariner run indoors?

    [quote=ed gee]He won the 2004 NCAA indoor in 45.39 and ran on the winning 4x400m relay.
    In 2003, he was 7th indoors.

    Originally posted by "Track fan":3w2nez9h
    I don't recall him ever running indoors as a pro? Did he run indoors as collegian? Anybody have an idea why he shuns the indoor circuit? :?:
    [/quote:3w2nez9h]

    Those were in his sophomore and freshman years, quite a long time ago. Team elements have an effect on meet choice.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Marlow
      I don't really believe the ticking clock theory, because so many people have done indoors and outdoors successfully.
      WADR, a pretty vague statement.
      Take good care of yourself.

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      • #18
        i saw jeremy in valencia for the WI. i asked why he wasn;t running indoors and he said because he had been traiing in AUS. i observed that running 400m indoors can be complicated to which he replied 'no it's easy' ops:
        i deserve extra credit

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        • #19
          Originally posted by gh
          Not in the basic Clyde Hart training philosophy? (for his pros)
          Bingo!

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          • #20
            Why Doesn't Jeremy Wariner Run Indoors?

            Wariner ran 44.74 on the 4x400 WR at Tyson in February 2006. Photo & results are on p. 10 of April 2006 T&FN.
            none

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            • #21
              Lots of reasons why he might not shared above and all valid to some extent. Cathy Freeman never ran indoor open races as she found it chopped her stride running on the banked track. She did however run in Japan at WI in the 4x4, but given she ran a later left she would have had a better change to open up rather than race to the lane break.

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              • #22
                It is harder for some to run indoors than others, but that is really not even an issue. Years before, just about EVERYBODY ran indoors. Michael Johnson ran indoors until late in his career.

                The indoor meets don't pay as much and the titles don't mean as much either. The Visa championship winner used to only get paid $10,000. They just recently increased it to $25,000. And that is just for 1 man and 1 woman.

                For athletes that are trying to get attention from meet directors and agents, they need to run indoors. They need every opportunity they need to race. Once you are able to get a lane in all the big meets, you then can scrap indoors and focus on the summer meets.

                This is not everyone's strategy. More Europeans run indoors. But you will find that most top athletes (sprinters for that matter) will forego indoors to focus on outdoor races and championships.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by OldSprint
                  This is not everyone's strategy. More Europeans run indoors. ...
                  The Europeans get an (extra) National (team scoring) meet out of indoors and the indoors season is more active at better venues than in the US, where it is more of a collegiate season.

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                  • #24
                    Surely an athlete's desire to race indoors is somewhat related to their need to train indoors?

                    If you live in a location where track work is predominantly indoor during winter, perhaps it makes more sense to then race in such conditions. Whereas an athlete in a warm enough climate to safely train outdoors in winter might not want to adjust to indoor conditions for some pretty meaningless races? Just a theory.

                    Is Waco warm enough in winter to stay outdoors?

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by AS
                      Surely an athlete's desire to race indoors is somewhat related to their need to train indoors?

                      If you live in a location where track work is predominantly indoor during winter, perhaps it makes more sense to then race in such conditions. Whereas an athlete in a warm enough climate to safely train outdoors in winter might not want to adjust to indoor conditions for some pretty meaningless races? Just a theory.

                      Is Waco warm enough in winter to stay outdoors?
                      It is not always warm (when the 'blue northers' come in), but it definitely is not always cold, and it is definitely warmer than it is up this way (Madison, WI). JW did go down to Oz for a while mid-winter.

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                      • #26
                        JW: "The reason I wear my sunglasses is because they help me stay focused and block out the crowd."

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