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Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

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  • michael lewis
    replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    "Not so fast there.......superb technique? Devers' technique is far from superb."

    It's gotten better over the years. Although not all hurdlers run the flat 100 often enough to be able to make a meaningful comparison between their sprint and hurdle times, history's best have usually made decent marks over 100 as well (Devers, Enquist, Donkova, the DDR hurdlers) and you can see who's spending less time off the ground. Seems to vary between 1 and 1.5 seconds for the top 50 in any year. Devers in '92 was at about 1.5 seconds, by '99 she was 1.4 and by 2000 it was 1.2 at the US Trials. 1992 US Trials Devers 11.02/12.57, '93 WC 10.82/12.46, 2000 US Trials, 11.14/12.33.

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  • BisonHurdler
    replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    >Funny that Kersee couldn't get Devers with her 10.82
    >speed and years of hurdling experience, not to mention superb technique.....






    Not so fast there.......superb technique? Devers' technique is far from superb.

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  • michael lewis
    replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    "Just because.........I'm going to play devil's advocate imagine.....Marion Jones a 100mH at either height can we say world record out of this world........given her athletic abitlity and with some hurdle technique training..........Hey Bobby Kersee want to come out of retirement.......lol"

    Funny that Kersee couldn't get Devers with her 10.82 speed and years of hurdling experience, not to mention superb technique, to break the record.....and yet someone would think that Marion, 0.12 faster than Devers (not counting altitude), would only need "some hurdle technique training". If it was that easy, why is Devers only the second woman in the last 55 years to win a sprint/hurdle double at a worlds or Olympics?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    Just because.........I'm going to play devil's advocate imagine.....Marion Jones a 100mH at either height can we say world record out of this world........given her athletic abitlity and with some hurdle technique training..........Hey Bobby Kersee want to come out of retirement.......lol

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    aside from the capabilities of the athlete, taking seven steps to the first hurdle has alot to do with how comfortable the athlete is coming out of the blocks the "wrong" way (position of the feet is reversed). since this is what's required to reach the first hurdle in seven steps with the correct lead leg.

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  • BisonHurdler
    replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    I think Schwarthoff has taken 7 steps, I am not 100% positive, I'd have to check my numerous track tapes, which i don't have access to until this weekend or so, but i seem to remember him doing it on at least an occasion or two....or perhaps all the time.


    If anyone could do it, it's him......


    As far as I know though, Foster and pretty much everyone else was an 8-stepper.

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  • Per Andersen
    replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    " Anybody out there with any idea as to whether or not modern hurdlers take on step fewer from the blocks to the first barrier than they did in the early days?"

    In Gosta Holmer's books from the 1940's the 8 step approach to the first hurdle was descibed as the norm. F.A.M Webster in his book from the 20's unfortunately does not discuss it as far as I can see.
    I am under the impression that most world level hurdlers still use 8 steps. For sure Allen Johnson does. With 7 steps it is often mentioned that this brings a distinct rythm change from long strides to the chopped strides between the hurdles which is difficult to handle.
    It would be interesting to know what taller guys like Greg Foster did.

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  • michael lewis
    replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    "Well stated Ben, I had to Lock out the T&FN web site from our junior running groups university computers because of M.L.s language."

    Well stated Ben, and U of C, keep up the good example for your charges (what was that bunny post again?)

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    >Enough.

    BAS, don't poison threads with continued personal attacks. Michael
    >Lewis has his email address included with his posts. Got a problem with him?
    >Take it up with him offline.

    ML, bite your tongue. Don't fire off some nasty
    >reply just because you can. You have good things to offer this community yet
    >you sully anything you post when you entertain one of your unpleaseat
    >outbursts.

    Consider yourselves warned.

    -Ben


    Well stated Ben, I had to Lock out the T&FN web site from our junior running groups university computers because of M.L.s language.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    yes, women hurdles should be higher. The event is too easy for top women. Irina showed that any woman bored of other event can come along and win this gold medal!

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  • dj
    replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    Clearing up a couple things:

    Charlie Moore was the first to run 13 strides throughout the race, and did it his entire career, 1949-52. Moses was the next to hold 13 the whole way.

    The person who played with 12 strides, and often held that pattern until the second turn, was Kevin Young.

    Don't know the answer to GH's question, but my guess is that 110m hurdlers have switched block positions at some point. Best source for this might be an early version of Doherty's "Omnibook," as he was fascinated with the evolution of technique.

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  • bhall
    replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    Enough.

    BAS, don't poison threads with continued personal attacks. Michael Lewis has his email address included with his posts. Got a problem with him? Take it up with him offline.

    ML, bite your tongue. Don't fire off some nasty reply just because you can. You have good things to offer this community yet you sully anything you post when you entertain one of your unpleaseat outbursts.

    Consider yourselves warned.

    -Ben

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    "Anybody out there with any idea as to whether or not modern hurdlers take one step fewer from the blocks to the first barrier than they did in the early days?"

    As an ex-hurdler (masters sorta doesn't count) I do watch that kind of stuff when they actually show it on TV and the best answer I can give is that just as Edwin Moses conquered the 13-stride pattern, some hurdlers have gone to switching their block placement so they drive off the 'wrong' leg (right for a right lead leg) and get to the first hurdle with one less stride. The trouble with that is that one can overstride coming out of the blocks, which is a very bad thing because hurdlers have to 'pop up' faster than sprinters and get into a 'regular' stride pattern quickly. I experimented with it and it made me slower, but then again, I ain't no 13-flat hurdler.

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  • Per Andersen
    replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    Did not Rod Milburn at on time experiment with longer spacing between the hurdles and ran under 13.0 when the rec was 13.2?
    All the best male hurdlers are chopping the strides drastically.
    I think the leading female hurdlers can all handle the 9.13 spacing between the hurdles and the 36' height. However, why do the spacing have tobe the same as for the men? It could be 9m or 8.90. Juniors can run 110 with the current 8.50m spacing if that is more suitable.

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  • gh
    replied
    Re: Should the Women's Hurdles Be Higher?

    Anybody out there with any idea as to whether or not modern hurdlers take one step fewer from the blocks to the first barrier than they did in the early days?

    Leave a comment:

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