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When is the last time a US man medalled over 400 M?

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  • #16
    Re: some dates

    Originally posted by trackhead
    Last American man:

    800: Johnny Gray, 1992, bronze. Last gold was Wottle in '72.
    1500: Jim Ryun, 1968, silver. Last gold was Mel Shepperd, 1908.
    5000: Bob Schul, 1964, gold.
    10000: Billy Mills, 1964, gold.
    3000mSC: Brian Deimer, 1984, bronze. Last gold was Horace Ashenfelter, 1952.
    Marathon: Meb Keflezighi, 2004, silver. Last gold was Shorter, 1972.
    Coincidentally, the last time the Cubs won the world series.

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    • #17
      Re: some dates

      Originally posted by trackhead
      Last American man:

      1500: Jim Ryun, 1968, silver. Last gold was Mel Shepperd, 1908.
      Sheppard is an incredible story ... read this recently in the Philadelphia Inquirer about him ... on the 100th anniversary of his first olympic gold medal:

      http://www.philly.com/inquirer/sports/2 ... ndard.html

      By Phil Anastasia

      Inquirer Staff Writer
      One of America's greatest Olympic champions was a South Jersey native who ran his first race as a Philadelphia schoolboy......

      [unacceptable amount of cut-and-pasted copy cut by mods: WHOLESALE COPYING OF AN ARTICLE IS PIRACY, let people use the URL]

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      • #18
        In addition to those listed above, Rich Kenah was Athens '97, right?

        Or are we just talking Olys?

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        • #19
          where's the love for flanagan???

          male only...??

          c'mon guys, spread the love...

          Comment


          • #20
            If it's any consolation, the state of US male distance running is fairly widely admired in Britain, and we're very envious of Symmonds, Wheating, Webb, Lomong, Tegenkamp, Ritzenhein and Hall. We're very envious of your collegiate facilities and the squad method of training in purpose-built camps (like Macmillan, etc) is also widely seen as a remedy to our own ills.

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            • #21
              now, if only the african nations didn't exist...

              say pre-1960??

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              • #22
                Originally posted by BillVol
                So how do we improve on this? Maybe the only thing that motivates Americans to do anything is the almighty dollar. What if Nike said they would give $1M to any runner who medalled at a distance of 800M and/or above? I'll bet that would get the attention of high school runners. What if Nike offered $5M to any runner who won a gold medal at these distances? What about $10M to any American who set a WR at a distance of 800 and above? There would be a bunch of foreigners who would want to become naturalized American citizens, so we'd have to make some rules.
                If Nike did such a thing, hopefully someone waiting for their child to die because they can't afford surgery would spear the COE with a javelin. What a disgusting thought. Sorry, just my useless little opinion. What kind of a world do Americans live in, anyway>

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by einnod23
                  In addition to those listed above, Rich Kenah was Athens '97, right?

                  Or are we just talking Olys?
                  Women, men, Olys and Worlds during the "Worlds Era", i.e. since 1983:

                  Mary Slaney golds 1500 and 3000, 1983
                  Marianne Dickerson silver marathon 1983
                  Steve Scott silver 1500, 1983
                  Joan Benoit gold marathon 1984 (boycotted, but not seriously affected)
                  Kim Gallagher silver 800 1984 (boycotted, seriously affected)
                  Earl Jones bronze 800 1984 (boycotted - who knows?)
                  Brian Diemer bronze SC 1984 (boycotted - who knows? - Kenya was there)
                  Jim Spivey bronze 1500 1987
                  Kim Gallagher bronze 800 1988 (boycotted by Cuba and ?)
                  Mark Everett bronze 800 1991
                  Steve Spence bronze marathon 1991
                  Johnny Gray bronze 800 1992
                  Lynn Jennings bronze 10000 1992
                  Mark Plaatjes gold marathon 1993
                  Regina Jacobs silver 1500 1997 (pre-doping, maybe?)
                  Rich Kenah bronze 800 1997
                  Regina Jacobs silver 1500 1999 " "
                  Meb Keflezighi silver marathon 2004
                  Deena Kastor bronze marathon 2004
                  Bernard Lagat gold 1500 and 5000 2007
                  Kara Goucher bronze 10000 2007
                  Shalane Flanagan bronze 10000 2008

                  Of all of these, for me the most moving and gladdening was Kastor in Athens. When she entered the stadium, she was not sure of her place; then she heard gh saying, "Third into the stadium..." and broke into tears. For most US athletes in the longer races, any medal is so unexpected (not necessarily by the athlete him/herself) that it's almost like winning. Last year, we expected Lagat to medal (yes, a verb: to medal v.i. - to win a medal in sport; in common parlance among Athletics fans >:-) last year, but Goucher was quite a big surprise, as was Flanagan this year.
                  Cheers,
                  Alan Shank

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                  • #24
                    The above posts are all the more reason to exclude anything over 400 from live television coverage in the U.S.

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                    • #25
                      Note that all U.S. men's golds involved running the 400 (not less than the 400; the 400).

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by BillVol
                        So how do we improve on this? Maybe the only thing that motivates Americans to do anything is the almighty dollar. What if Nike said they would give $1M to any runner who medalled at a distance of 800M and/or above? I'll bet that would get the attention of high school runners. What if Nike offered $5M to any runner who won a gold medal at these distances? What about $10M to any American who set a WR at a distance of 800 and above? There would be a bunch of foreigners who would want to become naturalized American citizens, so we'd have to make some rules.

                        We have the talent. Right now we have the talent. Dathan has it. But we need something to get us over the hump.
                        It may not be on offer in a lump sum, but I imagine these amounts aren't too far off from what the athletes know Nike (or another company) would pay for those achievements already.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: When is the last time a US man medalled over 400 M?

                          Originally posted by fez
                          Originally posted by BillVol
                          I'm too busy at the moment to look it up. When is the last time any American male T&F athlete medalled in a running event over 400 meters? Which event was it? Guessing it was the 800 M. And when was the last time an American man medalled in the OGs over 800 M?
                          Must you use "medal" as a verb? Can't people win medals anymore?
                          fez, how about, "Meb 'silvered' in the marathon"?

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Novitiate
                            Originally posted by BillVol
                            So how do we improve on this? Maybe the only thing that motivates Americans to do anything is the almighty dollar. What if Nike said they would give $1M to any runner who medalled at a distance of 800M and/or above? I'll bet that would get the attention of high school runners. What if Nike offered $5M to any runner who won a gold medal at these distances? What about $10M to any American who set a WR at a distance of 800 and above? There would be a bunch of foreigners who would want to become naturalized American citizens, so we'd have to make some rules.
                            If Nike did such a thing, hopefully someone waiting for their child to die because they can't afford surgery would spear the COE with a javelin. What a disgusting thought. Sorry, just my useless little opinion. What kind of a world do Americans live in, anyway>
                            Nov, what a stupid post. The money used on big-time sports is ridiculous in the first place. And it's not just Americans. China spent $40B on its games. The money I mentioned would nothing compared to the other big money involved in sports.

                            gh, could you explain what you meant by this post:

                            Note that all U.S. men's golds involved running the 400 (not less than the 400; the 400). Sometimes these things fly right over my head.

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                            • #29
                              Gold: Three golds: 4 x 400, 400, 400h

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by 26mi235
                                Gold: Three golds: 4 x 400, 400, 400h
                                Clay ran a 400 en route to his gold.

                                And, of course, the women's 400 meter discus.

                                (yes, I know he said men's)

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