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  • Bolt to run 200m in Lausanne

    Bolt is down to run a 200m in Lausanne next Tuesday (http://www.athletissima.ch/index_en.aspx)

    This is the track where the X-man popped out his 19.63 in 2006. In fact, it has seen the following runs:
    19.63 (0.4) Carter 2006
    19.70 (0.4) Gay 2006
    19.78 (0.0) Gay 2007
    19.85 (-0.9) Boldon 1996
    19.88 (0.4) Bolt 2006
    19.90 (0.4) Spearmon2006
    19.99 (1.1) Lewis 1993

    What do time we think Bolt will run?

    We may see the first 19.4_ time... or 19.5_

  • #2
    I think his body will still be recovering from His Olympic Load (3 world record runs, 9 total races), so the 1930 is probably out of the picture, but 19.4-19.5 could be possible as stated.

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    • #3
      Short track!! (jk)

      That's an impressive Meet Record to hold!!

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      • #4
        who else is running?

        Comment


        • #5
          Lausanne's sitting at 400m altitude. That in itself helps the 200m results, as is evidence by the all-time list posted above.

          It wouldn't surprise me to see Bolt jog a 19.7 with a healthy wind. I'd worry that pushing too hard will risk injury at this stage.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by JRM
            Lausanne's sitting at 400m altitude..
            and can be very humid there. although this late in the season, not so much.

            Comment


            • #7
              Anyone following X carter figures he has it in him to run 19.6s again i am asking out of pure ignorance of not knowing his trends right now?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JRM
                Lausanne's sitting at 400m altitude. That in itself helps the 200m results, as is evidence by the all-time list posted above.

                It wouldn't surprise me to see Bolt jog a 19.7 with a healthy wind. I'd worry that pushing too hard will risk injury at this stage.
                Actually, it would surprise me to not see him run to the finish line, he has said he wants to put on a good show for the fans and that doesn't equal with jogging.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by malmo
                  Originally posted by JRM
                  Lausanne's sitting at 400m altitude..
                  and can be very humid there. although this late in the season, not so much.
                  Humidity certainly didn't bother him in Beijing.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by roundthebend
                    Originally posted by malmo
                    Originally posted by JRM
                    Lausanne's sitting at 400m altitude..
                    and can be very humid there. although this late in the season, not so much.
                    Humidity certainly didn't bother him in Beijing.
                    It doesn't bother them -- it helps them. Higher humidity = thinner air = faster times.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JRM

                      It doesn't bother them -- it helps them. Higher humidity = thinner air = faster times.
                      Would you consider 21C and 87% humidity somewhat anomalous, given your research as outlined here?

                      http://tinyurl.com/5rp8mn

                      21C/87% = conditions for men's 400 final in Beijing

                      http://results.beijing2008.cn/WRM/ENG/I ... #ATM004101

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Trackfan310
                        I think his body will still be recovering from His Olympic Load (3 world record runs, 9 total races), so the 1930 is probably out of the picture, but 19.4-19.5 could be possible as stated.
                        I agree, the recovery from such a workload combined with the highest physical output we've ever seen in the sprints will take an especially long time to completely recover from.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by roundthebend
                          Originally posted by malmo
                          Originally posted by JRM
                          Lausanne's sitting at 400m altitude..
                          and can be very humid there. although this late in the season, not so much.
                          Humidity certainly didn't bother him in Beijing.
                          Oxygen (O2) molecular mass = 32 = (16x2)

                          Nitrogen (N2) molecular mass = 28 = (14x2)

                          Air is 78% N2 and 21% O2. So (0.78x28) + (0.21x32) = 21.9 + 6.7 = 28.6 (molecular mass of N2+O2)

                          Molecular weight of dry air is actually 28.97 because the 1% remaining gasses have a total molecular mass of 0.37.

                          Water vapor H2O has a molecular mass of 18 (2 x1, plus 16 = 18)

                          Replacing dry air (28.97) with water vapor (18) lowers the density of air and thus resistance making it faster for running.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Novitiate
                            Originally posted by JRM

                            It doesn't bother them -- it helps them. Higher humidity = thinner air = faster times.
                            Would you consider 21C and 87% humidity somewhat anomalous, given your research as outlined here?

                            http://tinyurl.com/5rp8mn

                            21C/87% = conditions for men's 400 final in Beijing

                            http://results.beijing2008.cn/WRM/ENG/I ... #ATM004101
                            The humidity is pretty high, but the temperature is lower than one would expect (Atlanta and Barcelona, for example, had very high track-side temperatures in addition to humidity). The lower temperature would work against the effects of higher humidity.

                            Here's a calculator into which you can input that data to draw your own conclusions about the conditions:

                            http://myweb.lmu.edu/jmureika/track/Den ... itude.html

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JRM
                              Originally posted by Novitiate
                              Originally posted by JRM

                              It doesn't bother them -- it helps them. Higher humidity = thinner air = faster times.
                              Would you consider 21C and 87% humidity somewhat anomalous, given your research as outlined here?

                              http://tinyurl.com/5rp8mn

                              21C/87% = conditions for men's 400 final in Beijing

                              http://results.beijing2008.cn/WRM/ENG/I ... #ATM004101
                              The humidity is pretty high, but the temperature is lower than one would expect (Atlanta and Barcelona, for example, had very high track-side temperatures in addition to humidity). The lower temperature would work against the effects of higher humidity.

                              Here's a calculator into which you can input that data to draw your own conclusions about the conditions:

                              http://myweb.lmu.edu/jmureika/track/Den ... itude.html
                              I think that the lower temperature both increases the density directly and decreases the number of H2O molecules in the air and their proportion at a given relative humidity, and so increases the density relative to a similar RH (or even a lower RH but with a noticeably higher dew point) on a hot day.

                              Comment

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