Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Decathlon 1500 meters?

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Decathlon 1500 meters?

    Is there any 'question' about the typical performance of top decathletes (I know - not all, i.e., Bruce J) in the 1500 meters. Seems many competitions are decided before its run or a close competition is decided (lost) by a 'slow' guy.

    I am a biased distance guy but a decathlon fan as well. This became, once again, a deal for me when BC ran it in a time surpassed by 2 of my HS sophmore daughters. He was (and he''s not been the only one) = "greatest athlete in the world."

    Not tryin to flame, just wondering if others have a take. I have had similar conversations in past.

  • #2
    Re: Decathlon 1500 meters?

    Originally posted by no one
    Not tryin to flame, just wondering if others have a take. I have had similar conversations in past.
    They run as fast as they need to? Which does not always mean as fast as they can.

    Comment


    • #3
      Decath

      I'm ignorant of the scoring table details per event. Would a high school sophomore performance in the discus, say, penalize one more (earn far fewer points) a similar performance in 1500? Clay did win many events or finish in top 3; so his lead obviously was very large for him to jog in to victory.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Decath

        Originally posted by darkside
        I'm ignorant of the scoring table details per event.
        You needn't be. They're available on the web.

        http://www.iaaf.org/mm/Document/Competi ... CE_744.pdf

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Decathlon 1500 meters?

          Originally posted by no one
          Not tryin to flame, just wondering if others have a take. I have had similar conversations in past.
          Your daughters don't have to do the other 9 events first. Your daughters don't have to train for 9 other events. Your daughters do not have to carry a lot of muscle weight. Your daughters probably ARE wired for distance running.

          Bryan Clay is not by any stretch of the imagination a distance runner. He is a sprinter/jumper who is strong enough to do well in the throws, but the 1500 just has to do with what's left over. If he trained for a month just on the 1500 and ran it fresh, he could probably get down to 4:30, which is smoking fast for a fast-twitch anerobic kinda guy.

          Comment


          • #6
            Note: This is not a criticism, just an observation:
            Being disappointed in Clay's 1500 is equivalent to those who were disappointed in Bolt's last 25m of the 100, saying he didn't run as hard as he could.

            Or, compare it to Hellebaut in the WHJ. Once Vlasic missed on her last jump, Hellebaut could have taken three more jumps at the next height. She didn't. Should we complain?

            Or, compare it to Wanjiru's final 400m in the men's marathon. If he hadn't raised his arms so much, and had got up on his toes and sprinted, he could have run several seconds faster! Should we be disappointed?

            The 1500 of the decathlon is quite similar to the last stretch of a marathon. In both cases, unless the competition is close or an important record is at stake, there is every reason to ease up and celebrate. The goal is to win. If that is certain, they can finish any way they please. They have already proven they are the best.

            Comment


            • #7
              he's not likely to crack 9000 let alone the wr if he doesn't push his 1500

              obviously this wasn't the place to do it - win only

              however, next year ( or after ) at gotzis, he'll have to push it

              Comment


              • #8
                Clay would have had to run 4:36.31 in the 1500 to break Sebrle's WR at Beijing. Anyone know what his PR for the 1500 is in a decathlon?

                Comment


                • #9
                  4:38.93.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Has any decathlete ever come from behind after nine events to win by running a blazing 1500m in a major meet ?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Has any decathlete ever come from behind after nine events to win by running a blazing 1500m in a major meet ?

                      good question

                      or has a (big)decath. been decided by1500 mark one way or the other (bllazing or otherwise)?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Bruce Jenner: "Training for the 10 track-and-field events of the decathlon was an eight-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week job. "To train to that level, you have to be so obsessed with what you are doing. In the off-season, I would run 70-mile weeks. I did an enormous amount of lifting and an enormous amount of technical work," he says. His work paid off, and Bruce captured the hearts of the nation by winning the gold medal in 1976. "I'm very proud of that moment. I worked very, very hard and did an enormous amount of training for it and went to the big show and performed my absolute best,"

                        I think Jenner ran 4:12pr and maybe 4:16 in 76 Oly???

                        and are these correct? ...Russ Hodge, 6'3" 225. 10.3, 25'2" 61'!!,47.6 and 4:11.0 in the 1,500. Saw him compete numerous times - what a talent

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jhc68
                          Has any decathlete ever come from behind after nine events to win by running a blazing 1500m in a major meet ?
                          Joe Detmer ran 4:04 to come in second in the NCAAs a couple of years ago and said that he might have gone sub-4 if he had not gone out so slowly. That is pretty good for a guy that was not even on athletic scholarship (until the last year or so) but was an Academic All-American in Engineering.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 26mi235
                            Joe Detmer ran 4:04 to come in second in the NCAAs a couple of years ago and said that he might have gone sub-4 if he had not gone out so slowly. That is pretty good for a guy that was not even on athletic scholarship (until the last year or so) but was an Academic All-American in Engineering.
                            That's not just pretty good IMO, that's unreal. Could have gone sub-4 for a decathlete? I've honestly never heard of such a thing.

                            Fastest decathlon 1500m ever in the Olympic Games? I'm sure someone out there knows it or can find it a lot faster than I can...
                            "Long may you run"- Neil Young

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 26mi235
                              Originally posted by jhc68
                              Has any decathlete ever come from behind after nine events to win by running a blazing 1500m in a major meet ?
                              Joe Detmer ran 4:04 to come in second in the NCAAs a couple of years ago and said that he might have gone sub-4 if he had not gone out so slowly. That is pretty good for a guy that was not even on athletic scholarship (until the last year or so) but was an Academic All-American in Engineering.
                              Rob Baker ran 3:58 to qualify for the '80 trials. (He had a 160+ Discus. )Sometimes the performance in the 1500 is not always about finishing 1st but often about meeting a goal.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X