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  • #16
    They have "a close, personal relationship that has nothing to do with pole vaulting," Suhr said. "If people were to assume Jenn and I were involved, that would be a pretty good assumption."

    Stuczynski said she agreed with Suhr's description of their relationship but preferred not to comment on her private life.
    Just out of curiosity, does anyone know of any elite-level male pole vaulters who are involved in close personal relationships with their coaches?

    I'm not saying that such things are wrong, but I'm starting to think that Isinbaeva is the only elite female vaulter who isn't romantically involved with her coach (at least as far as I know :shock: ).

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    • #17
      Don:t recogn there are many females training male international stars; other alternative is that there would be male-male relationships (who knows).

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      • #18
        Originally posted by BruceFlorman
        I'm starting to think that Isinbaeva is the only elite female vaulter who isn't romantically involved with her coach (at least as far as I know ).
        Monika Pyrek, for one.
        Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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        • #19
          Originally posted by 30yrs-coaching
          I hope this is enough. It wasn't just "well the equipment kept breaking"...with that added to the men's competition ..it must have been a disaster out there!
          IBPVC wrote:
          I heard that Brad has entered a protest. Not sure on what grounds other than having to wait 2.5 hours before jumping with no warm-ups. I cant find anything about it online, but that's the word from Pat. I know nothing about the rules really so let's all hope and pray for him to make it in.
          [quote:1ghn1ao1]Hartwig Quote
          "My performance had nothing to do with my preparation for the meet but the way the meet was run," he said. "If you watch the event, you will see that they made us wait there for an hour. Why does the competition start at 8:40 p.m., and we are still jumping at midnight?"
          [/quote:1ghn1ao1]

          If there were problems with the way the competitions were run, they affected everyone. You can't use that as an excuse for doing worse than expected compared to your rivals.
          Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Powell
            Originally posted by 30yrs-coaching
            I hope this is enough. It wasn't just "well the equipment kept breaking"...with that added to the men's competition ..it must have been a disaster out there!
            IBPVC wrote:
            I heard that Brad has entered a protest. Not sure on what grounds other than having to wait 2.5 hours before jumping with no warm-ups. I cant find anything about it online, but that's the word from Pat. I know nothing about the rules really so let's all hope and pray for him to make it in.
            [quote:1vc0lx12]Hartwig Quote
            "My performance had nothing to do with my preparation for the meet but the way the meet was run," he said. "If you watch the event, you will see that they made us wait there for an hour. Why does the competition start at 8:40 p.m., and we are still jumping at midnight?"
            If there were problems with the way the competitions were run, they affected everyone. You can't use that as an excuse for doing worse than expected compared to your rivals.[/quote:1vc0lx12]

            It was worse on Brad's pit with the equipment failures and such. Hooker struggled too, but he did have a slight advantage by not having to wait 45 minutes between attempts like Brad did.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by BruceFlorman
              They have "a close, personal relationship that has nothing to do with pole vaulting," Suhr said. "If people were to assume Jenn and I were involved, that would be a pretty good assumption."

              Stuczynski said she agreed with Suhr's description of their relationship but preferred not to comment on her private life.
              Just out of curiosity, does anyone know of any elite-level male pole vaulters who are involved in close personal relationships with their coaches?

              I'm not saying that such things are wrong, but I'm starting to think that Isinbaeva is the only elite female vaulter who isn't romantically involved with her coach (at least as far as I know :shock: ).
              The dynamics are totally different there. Aside from there being no female coaches at that level, I don't think you see male athletes involved with their female coaches much in any sport.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by polevaultpower
                It was worse on Brad's pit with the equipment failures and such. Hooker struggled too, but he did have a slight advantage by not having to wait 45 minutes between attempts like Brad did.
                So how do you account for the fact that 7 men qualified out of Walker's group, whereas only 6 from the other group did?
                Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Powell
                  Originally posted by polevaultpower
                  It was worse on Brad's pit with the equipment failures and such. Hooker struggled too, but he did have a slight advantage by not having to wait 45 minutes between attempts like Brad did.
                  So how do you account for the fact that 7 men qualified out of Walker's group, whereas only 6 from the other group did?
                  They were warmed up from coming in lower. Brad and Steve both suffered from having to wait so long to come in. Brad moreso because his wait between attempts was much longer than Steve's.

                  I don't think Brad had any way of knowing it would take _that_ long for the bar to get to that height, and he definitely did not have any way of knowing the equipment would break and leave him hanging between jumps. How do you stay warm when you are on the runway and have no idea when they will fix it?

                  All of the vaulters struggled with the runway. Watch the videos, the vast majority of misses were coming down on the bar. The champions dealt with it the best.

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                  • #24
                    One would hope that the more important the meet, the more that the organizers and officials would want the BEST possible conditions, not the most trying. The weather should be the x-factor, not meet management. And I am not one of those who thinks that in bad conditions the playing field is still level. Bad conditions randomize the normal hierarchy. Luck plays a greater role. The best does NOT always win. The 'fairness' factor goes out the window, and while life is not always fair, athletic competitions SHOULD be as fair as possible. As in football or soccer, the officials should be invisible and play no role in the outcome. It seems as though that's not entirely the case here.

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                    • #25
                      I am surprised about the medal given to the coach. The men's water polo team was on our flight from Beijing to SF. I asked the coach if he got a medal too. He said no. Who decides which coaches get medals?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Marlow
                        The best does NOT always win. The 'fairness' factor goes out the window, and while life is not always fair, athletic competitions SHOULD be as fair as possible.
                        You're right, there's no excuse for a poorly run competition at the Olympic Games.

                        But remember that in the women's final the top four finishers achieved: one world record, one personal best and one seasons best. In the men's final both Hooker and Lukyanenko were medal favorites and held their form at Beijing. Walker had been on a downward slide since his exceptional early season marks.

                        I suspect that poorly run competitions don't necessarily randomize the results, but can further separate the absolute elite from the regular elite. And the absolute elite have attained that position for reasons that go beyond pure physical ability.

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                        • #27
                          Suhr was caught in a duel relationship: paramour and coach. If he enters that duality he needs to keep boundaries on what role he plays. When I saw the event and the commentaries, I thought he was much ruder than a coach should be. The comments when read aren't so bad, it was the tone.

                          Suhr needed to remember his role was coach, not paramour; his comments should be more objective. However this statement is revealing:
                          I'm a very personal guy; I don't like being miked. But it was an opportunity for Jenn. If she stuck a big jump, she'd be a millionaire in endorsements. It didn't work out that way."...

                          Suhr said the Olympics were not how people perceive them.

                          "It's not all cuddly and nice," he said. "This is big money, big promoter, big agents. It's how people make their living. If people don't medal, (those around them) don't have a job on Monday."

                          He agreed he can be more like gruff Bill Parcells than congenial Tony Dungy but said the stakes were too high to change his style.

                          "This is not baking brownies at a Girl Scout camp," he said. "This is the real thing. And this was good coaching."
                          Ahah. Suhr watched a million dollars evaporate (from his 'personal' life).

                          Ouch, and that reveals why the partner responded and not the professional coach. That's the trouble with duel relationships...it's not always bad, but the boundaries get confused.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Snation
                            Ouch, and that reveals why the partner responded and not the professional coach. That's the trouble with duel relationships...it's not always bad, but the boundaries get confused.
                            And we tend to treat those closest to us with a lack of deference we show others, because we know they will still love us regardless. I agree that he responded more as 'paramour' than coach. But there is still no abuse there, as so many have tried to impute.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by trig
                              I am surprised about the medal given to the coach. The men's water polo team was on our flight from Beijing to SF. I asked the coach if he got a medal too. He said no. Who decides which coaches get medals?

                              I'd like to know that myself. It seems to me if the USOC was going to hand out replica medals the coaches of TEAMS that won medals would be first in line, and deservedly so.

                              Seriously, there has to be someone reading this board that can shed some light - Is this BS, or if not who decides what coaches are "worthy"?
                              There are no strings on me

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Snation
                                That's the trouble with duel relationships...it's not always bad, but the boundaries get confused.
                                Yeah, ask Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr . . .

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