Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Coach slams new NCAA Regionals format

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by lonewolf
    Advance the top three places from each regional and next four performances from all regionals to nationals.
    I like everything but that point. The conditions are too variable - one site will inevitably be favored for each event. I'm cool with the national at-large qualifiers from pre-meet performances, but I would stipulate a smaller window (closer to the Regional) than the current one (excl. the 10K and multis).
    Granted, conditions will vary and there is always the possibility some deserving athletes will be eliminated at regionals but, I believe if an athlete cannot place in top 16, despite regional conditions, he/she probably did not have a shot anyway.

    Comment


    • #32
      clearly you guys are not ncaa football fans. LOL The NCAA has never made moves that make sense so I do not expect this to make much sense either. And from what I am reading it is not making sense.
      So eliminate regionals all together. or just reduce the numbers to 24. That's simple enough right? But like I said, when has the NCAA ever made sensible decisions.
      This will make sense when we get a playoff system in football. lol

      Comment


      • #33
        a great point

        Lonewolf brings up a great point about officials. Over the last several years the NCAA Track & Field Committee has had discussions about the real serious issue about our aging officials, and the difficulty of getting new, younger people into the profession. There was even a request for funds to begin a "new officials orientation" to the NCAA Cabinet, but alas, they turned it down. I'm looking forward to officiating some day soon, but I'm an old dog already. How are we going to entice younger officials to get involved and sustain us through the next generation of track meets? How is this for an invitation:

        "Hey, bud, would you like to get involved in officiating with me. You can show up to the track at 7:00am, pull the tape measure through the discus for 6 hours, stand out in the hot sun all day, then if you are lucky get a free meal from the host institution and not get paid a penny"

        Darn, if that isn't a great sell job!!!

        The NCAA Cabinet in their infinite wisdom never really understood the importance of "meet management" in the discussion and all the ramifications it has for our beloved sport.

        Comment


        • #34
          I am only 77 years young so the physical requirements are no problem for me. I am just thinking of some of the younger officials who have trouble keeping up.

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: a great point

            Originally posted by HigherEd
            "Hey, bud, would you like to get involved in officiating with me. You can show up to the track at 7:00am, pull the tape measure through the discus for 6 hours, stand out in the hot sun all day, then if you are lucky get a free meal from the host institution and not get paid a penny"
            Why should that be more appealing to older people than to younger ones?

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: a great point

              Originally posted by tandfman
              Originally posted by HigherEd
              "Hey, bud, would you like to get involved in officiating with me. You can show up to the track at 7:00am, pull the tape measure through the discus for 6 hours, stand out in the hot sun all day, then if you are lucky get a free meal from the host institution and not get paid a penny"
              Why should that be more appealing to older people than to younger ones?
              I don't think it is more appealing to old folks. Maybe it is just one of those things that somebody has to do.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by lonewolf
                I am only 77 years young so the physical requirements are no problem for me. I am just thinking of some of the younger officials who have trouble keeping up.
                Hey...I'm 44 and it was the Palm Pilot's fault...not mine.... :lol: :lol: :lol:

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by ndamix
                  Originally posted by lonewolf
                  I am only 77 years young so the physical requirements are no problem for me. I am just thinking of some of the younger officials who have trouble keeping up.
                  Hey...I'm 44 and it was the Palm Pilot's fault...not mine.... :lol: :lol: :lol:
                  Eureka!!!! Mike, I think you have discovered the path to longevity and job security... learn the Palm Pilot.. get out of the pit. :wink:
                  (I was not talking about you. Honest. Come back to the Texas Relays next year. It takes seniority to wedge those sorority girls out of the plum Palm Pilot jobs but you can have first choice of broom or rake :lol: )
                  Just think, if the Palm Pilot and pit leveler had been invented thirty or forty years ago, I might still be fit enough to have a shot at being the only 85 year old official at the 2016 Chicago Olympics.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: a great point

                    Originally posted by tandfman
                    Originally posted by HigherEd
                    "Hey, bud, would you like to get involved in officiating with me. You can show up to the track at 7:00am, pull the tape measure through the discus for 6 hours, stand out in the hot sun all day, then if you are lucky get a free meal from the host institution and not get paid a penny"
                    Why should that be more appealing to older people than to younger ones?
                    They have money to pay their own way to meets. People my age don't.

                    People my age also realize that officials/referees in just about every other sport out there get paid (some well, others it just covers the gas, but most are not losing money to do it).

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: a great point

                      Originally posted by polevaultpower
                      People my age also realize that officials/referees in just about every other sport out there get paid (some well, others it just covers the gas, but most are not losing money to do it).
                      Interesting surmise, Becca. I assume your " not losing money" reference is to officials in other sports. If you include T&F I am definitely in that minority who are losing money officiating. It just happens that I signed my 2007 Federal Tax Return today. My accountant says It cost me $9258 to officiate track meets last year.. and I am a Scrooge who travels pretty vanilla.

                      But I sure have a lot of hats and shirts.

                      I am not complaining. No one held a gun to my head. Just for your info.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: a great point

                        Originally posted by tandfman
                        Originally posted by HigherEd
                        "Hey, bud, would you like to get involved in officiating with me. You can show up to the track at 7:00am, pull the tape measure through the discus for 6 hours, stand out in the hot sun all day, then if you are lucky get a free meal from the host institution and not get paid a penny"
                        Why should that be more appealing to older people than to younger ones?
                        I wasn't meaning it would be more appealing to one over another. If you read my post carefully I was discussing trying to get younger people involved. I have found being a collegiate meet director for 30 years that it is actually easier to get the "over 55" crowd to officiate since they have more financial independence and more free time. But at some point all of my age group will have to slow down and get out. What will we do then? In working at each regional since its inception the ratio of officials over 55 to under 55 is probably 80/20 with one year 90/10. That 80 or 90 percent will have to step aside some day.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          It would be great if the under-40 set were able to officiate more, but I would rather they stay in the 'participant' phase of their life (be a husband-wife-mother-father-wage-earner) than the officiator stage of life. I only officiate at HS meets now, but I'm sure I will branch out more as my wrinkles deepen. That's sort of the way it should be. Pay back as you age; pay in when you have the chance.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            New NCAA Qualifying procedure

                            I am in full agreement with Barry Harwick's comments on this subject in every way, shape, and form and want to thank him for thaking the time to state this position so completely. I would much rather maintain the inequities of the previous system than move to this rediculous new system. Comparatively, the problems were minimal. That we will now be forced to take an athlete 1500 miles to take one jump or one throw with nothing but advancement at stake makes a travesty of competition in our sport. In the 100/200/HH advancing to two semi-finals of 8 and then cutting the qualifiers to 12, eliminating head to head competition, is incompatable with the things that are great about our sport. Why not just run those events in sections on time? Obviously, I'm kidding. Cornell has had 16 athletes make the NCAA Championships in the past 2 years. This is a major accomplishment for an Ivy League school. Almost all of these athletes would have made the meet regardless of the qualifying senario. BUT not ALL. The past Regional meets have been great track meets with great competition in each and every event with athletes going after it full tilt in every event. That concept has now been completely eliminated.

                            Who in the world would want to come and watch a meet like this? Top to bottom there will be no event worth watching. There will be no final's in any event. Imagine the top 12 in the 1500 standing on the track looking at each other trying to figure out why they are running. Field event athletes will withdraw from the competitions as soon as they know they are in the top 12. It will absolutely remove the incentive to compete. Generally, schools and athletes will have a week off before the Regionals, participate in the rediculous new qualifying system and then take another week off before the Nationals. Maybe the incentive to participate in the final would be for some glorified practice situation but I doubt it otherwise there will be no serious competition for nearly a month.

                            As a head coach, the financial burdens are a unpredictable enough as it is. This new system will ONLY drive up costs dramatically and add to logistical complications. Chasing marks has been reinstituted.

                            You'll have to go a long way to convince me that these new rules will do ANYTHING positive for our sport, our schools, our teams or our athletes.

                            I have been under the impression that each school got only 1 vote per gender. Cornell emphatically votes against this new advancement proceedure.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Re: a great point

                              Like Lonewolf, I have a lot of hats & shirts to show for my years of officiating and I haven't officiated nearly as long as he has.

                              As one of the younger officials on the scene (I'm 44), I happen to do roughly between 20 - 30 meets a year @ all levels (youth, HS, collegiate, & the USATF variety meets) throughout the country. With sons in both college and middle school (who competes in youth track) and my daytime job (which allows me to do my 'real job' :wink: ), I'd wager I'm paying roughly between $4K - $8K per annum (according to my tax returns) to do these meets. So I guess I'm still waiting on the 'get rich from officiating' ship to come in. :wink: :lol: :lol:

                              Compared to other sports folks my age or younger may be involved as officials, I would have to say I'm in the losing $$$$ category as well. In light of that statement, I'd have to say things have changed in that category since I've become involved in the sport as an official as Lonewolf can attest to.

                              While it may not be so prevelant @ the national level, particularly college/HS meet directors are realizing the importance of providing some type of compensation (be it an honorarium/lodging) to attract/retain compotent officials to work their competitions. With the economic situation changing, this sport has to realize that you're not going to attract folks my age & younger with the "love for the sport" slogan. It's just not going to work.

                              This is an area of the sport that can no longer be ignored as we see many of the core officials on the national scene age gracefully. As much as I'd love folks like Lonewolf and others to stay on the scene forever, the reality of that is that it won't. The sport's powers-that-be must figure out a way of attracting/retaining our younger officials to insure athletes competing in these various competitions are able to maximize their efforts in an equitible & safe manner.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Re: a great point

                                Originally posted by HigherEd
                                I wasn't meaning it would be more appealing to one over another. If you read my post carefully I was discussing trying to get younger people involved. I have found being a collegiate meet director for 30 years that it is actually easier to get the "over 55" crowd to officiate since they have more financial independence and more free time. But at some point all of my age group will have to slow down and get out. What will we do then? In working at each regional since its inception the ratio of officials over 55 to under 55 is probably 80/20 with one year 90/10. That 80 or 90 percent will have to step aside some day.
                                What you say makes a lot of sense. Until very recently, I would have said that there should be nothing to worry about. The people in your age group who slow down and get out will be replaced by the next generation of "over 55" folks who will now have more financial independence and more free time, right?

                                Not so fast. Unless the current financial sitaution turns completely around (something I wouldn't count on), a lot of the people who were contemplating retiring in the next few years may find themselves having to work longer, and some who are already retired may have to go back to work. I've spoken to a number of friends in the past week who were contemplating retirement, but who now say they don't know when they'll be able to afford to do that. There are surely many people in that boat, some of them potential track officials.

                                Hang in there as long as you can. Everyone appreciates the service of those of any age who do officiate.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X