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  • HS CC Distances

    Being that this is kind of a "slow week", this ought to liven things up: (info taken mostly from State Activities Assn. websites).

    All State HS Championships for boys are contested at 5000m except:

    Hawaii, Illinois, Montana, and New Mexico (all listed at 3 mi. This is a difference of about 37-38 sec. for a 16 minute 5K runner)

    All State HS CC Championships for girls are contested at 5000m except:

    Hawaii, Illinois, Montana, and New Mexico (all listed at 3 mi);
    The following states run 4000m for girls (this a difference of about 4 minutes for a 19 minute 5k runner):
    Kansas, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Dakota, Washington, Wisconsin and Nebraska.

    Texas runs the shortest at 3.2K/2mi. (This is a difference of about 6.5 minutes for a 18 minute 5K runner).

    (Admittedly, the actual distances run could be somewhat different and courses do vary and some are at "altitude".)

  • #2
    Obviously you never ran cross-country.

    Cinco De Mills--who cares about the distance--two mills, a farm house, a chicken coup, and a used car lot. What could be better?

    NFHS rules require the course to be 2500 to 5000m.

    You need to take what the course venue gives you. If you look at the IAAF championships, you get wierd distances. I mean like 7896m for one race.

    Sometimes it is better to run 3 miles and have a great finish versus trying to extend the course with a sharp turn then 25m to the chute.

    Most states have in their bylaws a small variances, like the course will be 5k with a variance of 200m either way.

    And, every state has its own particular needs, climate, etc.

    For example, Alaska has a little bit different of a climate than Florida and Arizona. So, don't be upset if I disagree on the point that every state should have their state meet the Wednesday before Thanksgiving.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by nokick
      For example, Alaska has a little bit different of a climate than Florida and Arizona.
      Is this really true? What's your source for that? Is that on Wikipedia?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bambam
        Originally posted by nokick
        For example, Alaska has a little bit different of a climate than Florida and Arizona.
        Is this really true? What's your source for that? Is that on Wikipedia?
        You cannot see Russian foreign policy from there, although FL almost made that club 40+ years ago....

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        • #5
          I don't know where the North Carolina information came from . NC has been 5K for girls for something like 20 years

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          • #6
            I will never understand the absurdity of running a metric distance with the splits at imperial distances and providing an average minutes/mile pace in the results.

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            • #7
              Washington runs a 5k for girls and has for many years.

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              • #8
                Hey--I am just a Joe-Six-Pack and my wife is a great Hockey mom.

                But, I guess the point is that the exact distance is meaningless.

                Just look at the rules, on a track you measure a foot from the curb for the distance. In a cross-country course, you measure right down the middle of the course. So, if you ran a CC course strictly on a track, you would be shorter than 400m.

                CC courses are supposed to have hills and be physically demanding. It is about racing--not times. That is what road races and track meets are for.

                I see these idiots try to compare a course in the flatlands of Florida to a hilly Woodward Park in California.

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                • #9
                  Interesting topic.

                  If I recall correctly, California (at least the CIF SS) switched from 2 miles to 3 miles in 1976. I was coaching xc at the time and wondered how it would affect my runners and I was pleasantly surprised to find that increasing the distance by 50% didn't seem to matter to them at all. The same kids had good competitive results no matter what the distance.

                  In retrospect, it is also surprising that many legendary California HS distance runners -- Hulst, Serna, et al, guys whose names still pop up on all-time lists three decades later -- spent most or all of their high school careers competing at the puny 2 mile xc distance. What are the implications there? I'm not sure.

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                  • #10
                    When I started XC in HS in California in the mid-60s they had just increased from 1.8 to 2 miles in XC and they had just added the 2 mile for track.

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                    • #11
                      Utah = 3 mile (some say a skosh less) for boys and girls ... maybe they've changed in last several yrs

                      CIF SS - 60s (63-71) @ LB State

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                      • #12
                        "In a cross-country course, you measure right down the middle of the course. So, if you ran a CC course strictly on a track, you would be shorter than 400m."

                        Not having a rule book these days, I always measured my XC courses at the shortest transect the runners could cover, so all of my courses would have been long, including one DIII Nationals which I suspect was measured shortest distance also, but that was in another lifetime.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nokick
                          In a cross-country course, you measure right down the middle of the course.
                          That's not the way I read the rule.

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                          • #14
                            Tandfan--you must have ELL issues...

                            NFHS rule 9-1-1

                            "The cross-country run shall be a course of 2500 to 5000 meters (1 1/2 to 3 miles) in length as determined by the meet director or games committee. Measurement shall be along the middle of the course"

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                            • #15
                              Sorry. I wasn't thinking about high schools (and I should have been, since that's what started this thread). I was thinking instead of the USATF rule, which basically says that you measure a cross country course as you would a road course, which is not down the center.

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