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Will Powell Beat Bolt? WR?

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  • Paul Henry
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by Paul Henry
    Marlow, we sure at the the opposite ends of the spectrum where Dix is concerned.
    I live in 'Nole Land and all I keep hearing is

    better start
    better top end
    better endurance

    The dude's already a 9.91/19.69 sprinter - what am I supposed to think?! 8-)
    Well I'm open to be shut up...let's wait and see. :wink:

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  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Henry
    Marlow, we sure at the the opposite ends of the spectrum where Dix is concerned.
    I live in 'Nole Land and all I keep hearing is

    better start
    better top end
    better endurance

    The dude's already a 9.91/19.69 sprinter - what am I supposed to think?! 8-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Henry
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Powell Opens 2009 With 47,75
    This is very good news. I've often thought that if he took the 400 a little more seriously and the 200 much more seriously, he wouldn't have that odd habit of losing after building great leads. I would love for him to challenge Bolt, and Gay and Dix to challenge the Jamaicans. All 4 could/should be in the 9.7s this year (that's me doubting that Bolt will run 9.6x this year, though obviously I'd love him to).

    How 'bout a 2009 year list like this?

    Bolt 9.71
    Powell 9.72
    Gay 9.75
    Dix 9.77

    Marlow, we sure at the the opposite ends of the spectrum where Dix is concerned. (OO.. ignore that ,I just realized I already addressed this statement. The Title changed I never realized)

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  • EPelle
    replied
    2007-2008.

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  • Texas
    replied
    Originally posted by EPelle
    Context: Trainer was discussing human limits and Powell's capabilities.
    Trust me a tainer in 1948 does not see a 9.69 100m. Nobody knows the limits of human capabilities. What 1960 trainer saw a 19.30 coming? Asafa Powell has done nothing to give the impression a sub 9.60 is a legit possibilty. Never put too much into what people say about their athletes.

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  • EPelle
    replied
    Context: Trainer was discussing human limits and Powell's capabilities.

    Leave a comment:


  • Texas
    replied
    Originally posted by EPelle
    Originally posted by Texas
    Originally posted by EPelle
    Originally posted by Texas
    Powell had his chance/chances and blew it. Now he's on the downside and will be watching young Bolt rule. While a win on the circuit is a possibility he will mever challenge Bolt when it matters and a WR is a..nope!
    Blew what? Gold medal(s)? He cleared the bar on the world-record front. Favourably.
    He never had to content with running a 9.68 to set a record....right?
    Right. Not yet. However, his trainer believes Powell can run in the 9,5s to 9,6s. And, might one add, that was pre-Bolt WR(s).
    I'm pretty sure if you asked the trainer of all those guys that Iron Mike Tyson knocked out how he thought his man would do, you wouldn't have heard.."get his butt kicked."

    Leave a comment:


  • EPelle
    replied
    Originally posted by Texas
    Originally posted by EPelle
    Originally posted by Texas
    Powell had his chance/chances and blew it. Now he's on the downside and will be watching young Bolt rule. While a win on the circuit is a possibility he will mever challenge Bolt when it matters and a WR is a..nope!
    Blew what? Gold medal(s)? He cleared the bar on the world-record front. Favourably.
    He never had to content with running a 9.68 to set a record....right?
    Right. Not yet. However, his trainer believes Powell can run in the 9,5s to 9,6s. And, might one add, that was pre-Bolt WR(s).

    Leave a comment:


  • Daisy
    replied
    Originally posted by gh
    But a Commonwealth call has nothing to do w/ the IAAF
    I understand that, I just mean it is not unprecedented in the sport. I don't recall any outcry from the athletes or officials when they crowned them both champion. I would have thought that would be the major issue. What is the IAAF's major problem with a handful of joint champions?

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  • gh
    replied
    But a Commonwealth call has nothing to do w/ the IAAF

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  • Daisy
    replied
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    but for some reason, the IAAF is reluctant to award double golds at championship meets. :?
    There is precedent since there was the Wells/McFarlane double gold in the Commonwealth Games 200m. I really think that if it is not a slam dunk decision when looking at the photo then they should just call it a tie. Anything that needs too close an inspection is automatically going to be subjective.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by gh
    Originally posted by sprintblox
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    Actually, it was the 1993 World Championships in Stuttgart where they had the same time, and it took so long (maybe 15 minutes) before a winner was declared, while the photo was being studied. Some people believe that the photo showed Ottey to be the victor, but unfortunately, the judges disagreed.
    It happened in 1993 and 1996. Both at 10.82 in 1993, both at 10.94 in 1996.
    We should have been so lucky as to have had the '93 decision in 15 minutes. It was 90 minutes after the race was over until the IAAF announced to the press that a decision had been made, but they said they couldn't tell us what it was until both the Jamaican and U.S. teams had been notified. It was another 5 minutes or so until that was accomplished.
    If ever there was an occasion to award double gold medals like they do in swimming, the 1993 race was it. In track and field, I've heard of a few occasions where double bronzes or double silvers were awarded, but for some reason, the IAAF is reluctant to award double golds at championship meets. :?

    Leave a comment:


  • Texas
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by Texas
    Powell had his chance/chances and blew it. Now he's on the downside and will be watching young Bolt rule. While a win on the circuit is a possibility he will mever challenge Bolt when it matters and a WR is a..nope!
    You must have Eldrick Syndrome. Athletes are not consistent automatons. Bolt will have bad days and AP will have good ones. ANYTHING can, and usually DOES happen when ultra-elites race. Edwin Moses, during his string, is the closest we've seen to perfection, and he too lost when we weren't expecting it.
    Moses went almost 10 years without a loss, so..bad example!

    Powell has proven that when the pressure is on he folds up like a crooked carny trying to escape town. Bolt seems to rise to the occasion. One is heading up while the other...down. Right now it's all about ..Usian Bolt. He will win the World's and set another WR sometime before he rides off into that Jamaican sunset. Asafa Powell might win a meaningless ...zzzz... race on the circuit. He will not break 9.69.

    Leave a comment:


  • Texas
    replied
    Originally posted by EPelle
    Originally posted by Texas
    Powell had his chance/chances and blew it. Now he's on the downside and will be watching young Bolt rule. While a win on the circuit is a possibility he will mever challenge Bolt when it matters and a WR is a..nope!
    Blew what? Gold medal(s)? He cleared the bar on the world-record front. Favourably.
    He never had to content with running a 9.68 to set a record....right?

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by Texas
    Powell had his chance/chances and blew it. Now he's on the downside and will be watching young Bolt rule. While a win on the circuit is a possibility he will mever challenge Bolt when it matters and a WR is a..nope!
    You must have Eldrick Syndrome. Athletes are not consistent automatons. Bolt will have bad days and AP will have good ones. ANYTHING can, and usually DOES happen when ultra-elites race. Edwin Moses, during his string, is the closest we've seen to perfection, and he too lost when we weren't expecting it.

    Leave a comment:

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