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Yikes! Skolimowska dead at 26

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  • Powell
    replied
    Originally posted by Powell
    Skolimowska's parents decided they will auction off her Olympic gold medal and use the proceeds for a charitable purpose.
    The auction was called off after the Polish Olympic Committee announced it would purchase the medal for PLN 200k to exhibit it in the Sports and Tourism Museum in Warsaw.

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  • Brian
    replied
    Originally posted by eldrick
    yes, you don't ask them to walk around......

    ....but there are specific illnesses with hypercoaguability but no other system involvement - i saw one of these recently & he is only 30y ole, had 2 clots already & on daily heparin injections for life - i can't remember what the condition is called ( it's rare ) & i'll look it up )

    Thanks El (& all others). Helps take at least a little of the fear of the unknown out of it for us laymen.

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  • Powell
    replied
    http://sport.onet.pl/0,1248733,1926164, ... omosc.html

    Skolimowska's parents decided they will auction off her Olympic gold medal and use the proceeds for a charitable purpose.

    Leave a comment:


  • DrJay
    replied
    More likely Factor V Leiden mutation, protein C deficiency, or protein S deficiency, which are genetic mutations in clotting proteins, inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, whereas Hughes syndrome (antiphospholipid antibody syndrome) is sporadic.

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  • eldrick
    replied
    Originally posted by Powell
    The thing is she DID have family history - her uncle died of the same thing just a few months ago, and his son was also diagnosed with a similar condition. And, for what it's worth, she did have a knee surgery last fall.
    a family history does suggest hughes syndrome

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  • eldrick
    replied
    Originally posted by ed gee
    Agree w/Garry on this one.

    Even with a crash cart, the odds were not likely in Skolimowska's favor
    forget crash-cart - that woudn't have saved her - it might re-start the heart for a few seconds but doesn't deal with underlying embolism & this wouda caused cardiac collapse again very quickly

    you can defibrillate her all you like - she had no chance

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  • Pego
    replied
    When a world class athlete (highly likely on the pill) develops a sudden dyspnea, it should be investigated, methinks.

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  • Powell
    replied
    Originally posted by DrJay
    When someone comes in and says, "Last night I had the sudden onset of sharp, localized chest pain that's worse when I take a deep breath, and I'm short of breath, and, by the way I just had my knee replaced three weeks ago [or, "I just drove from Alaska to Colorado last week"], it's pretty much a slam dunk to diagnose. you're going to order a lung scan. When a healthy 26 y.o. comes in and says "I've had a little bit of shortness of breath off and on for the last couple of months...nope, no chest pain, no recent surgery, no prolonged immobilization in a car or plane, no family history of clotting events", it's often not going to be looked for.
    The thing is she DID have family history - her uncle died of the same thing just a few months ago, and his son was also diagnosed with a similar condition. And, for what it's worth, she did have a knee surgery last fall.

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  • DrJay
    replied
    The current incarnation of "Yes" just cancelled the second half of a US tour, Chris Squire (rock's greatest bassist) with a health problem, and the rumor is that it's a DVT.

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  • DrJay
    replied
    Pulmonary emboli kill some 50,000 people in the US every year, and some 500,000 people have non-fatal PE yearly (#s from Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine). When someone comes in and says, "Last night I had the sudden onset of sharp, localized chest pain that's worse when I take a deep breath, and I'm short of breath, and, by the way I just had my knee replaced three weeks ago [or, "I just drove from Alaska to Colorado last week"], it's pretty much a slam dunk to diagnose. you're going to order a lung scan. When a healthy 26 y.o. comes in and says "I've had a little bit of shortness of breath off and on for the last couple of months...nope, no chest pain, no recent surgery, no prolonged immobilization in a car or plane, no family history of clotting events", it's often not going to be looked for. For every one of those patients with a PE, there will be 50 (?100...?200?) with asthma or anxiety or just plain out of shape. Because so many episodes of PE and DVT (deep vein thrombosis, clots in the leg, very rarely the arm) are missed, and in the hospital so many are preventable with low doses of SQ (injected subcutaneously) heparin, there's been a big push the last 10-15 years to make sure we treat all appropriate patients with prophylactic heparin when they are hospitalized. Tons of good studies about DVT/PE prevention/diagnosis/treatment. Canada has not only gifted us with Molson Golden, gh, and mojo, but also the work of Russell Hull and Jack Hirsh, of McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario (Hull may have moved to Alberta)...they are two of the big DVT/PE gurus.

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  • Pego
    replied
    Originally posted by Powell
    Also, her father was quoted saying she had breathing problems after the last OG to the point where she would be out of breath after walking up a flight of steps. Those symptoms went away after a while, so she was never properly diagnosed. Of course, it's always easier to see the warning signs in hindsight...
    This is the part that bothers me. It was in all likelihood the first PE, probably a smaller one that broke up. Somebody evidently didn't pay enough attention. Who, we don't know.

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  • ed gee
    replied
    Agree w/Garry on this one.

    Even with a crash cart, the odds were not likely in Skolimowska's favor.

    The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism can be difficult and, as seen in this case, often done on autopsy.

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Originally posted by Powell
    Info on the cause of death is expected to be released today. Most of the Polish team doctors who I've seen interviewed are suggesting a clot. There have also been suggestions that the death could have been avoided if a doctor was present on the spot...

    Here's Skolimowska's complete career record:
    http://www.pzla.pl/index2.php?page=aktu ... =1&id=2181
    I hope nobody's beating themselves up too badly over "if a doctor was present." Obviously everybody can't be expected to walk around with a physician on a minute's notice at all times. Life is full of risks.

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  • Powell
    replied
    The autopsy confirmed it was a clot in the lungs.

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  • eldrick
    replied
    if not the pill, this was what i was thinking about

    http://www.hughes-syndrome.org/overview.htm

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