Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

¶m3000: Galen Rupp (Oregon) 7:49.84¶

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Cyril
    replied
    Epelle-

    Was the stress fracture last fall? I think the Nike Free has been out for a few years now. Regardless of when it was, as you mentioned, it wasn't the result of being injury prone as much as the result of inappropriate training (which Salazar acknowledges).

    Leave a comment:


  • EPelle
    replied
    Originally posted by gh
    I'm still not seeing anything that remotely approaches injury prone.
    Injury-prone is scaled back. I learned more of his one-time stress fracture (and its cause, which has been corrected):

    "At times, Salazar has pushed too far. Last fall he embraced a new Nike shoe, the light and extremely flexible Free, which is designed to hone the sinew we use walking barefoot. Promotional material for the Free advises: "As for training, keep a low intensity and volume. Progression is key." But Salazar had Rupp running as much as three miles a day barefoot and in the Free--and the combination, Rupp says, led to a stress fracture. "Alberto realized that we probably went overboard on the barefoot stuff. He's able to learn from his mistakes, though. We cut back." (Later, Salazar told me, "You make mistakes. That was one that I made.")

    Leave a comment:


  • Cyril
    replied
    I agree with Gary. Ever since his senior year in high school, he has been remarkably sturdy.

    He may have missed competitions here and there to procatively deal with aches and pains before they became injuries, but I don't recall any serious injury problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    I'm still not seeing anything that remotely approaches injury prone.

    Leave a comment:


  • EPelle
    replied
    Originally posted by gh
    Foot Locker was 4½ years ago.
    Hypothyroidism wasn't, however.

    Certain folks loathe indoors, citing the real season begins under the blue skies. Glad Rupp the Duck did his thing in a (very) early-season tune-up for NCAA outdoors, USATF and/or IAAF.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    This story on Richard Thompson's decision to run eight races only five days before the Trinidad Olympics Trials is a pretty good indicator of the importance of a team title to a typical NCAA athlete.
    He only occasionally ran the 200 since coming to LSU, but added it to his repertoire in mid-April when Shaver brought it up. The only problem, Shaver said, was the Trinidad Olympic Trials start just six days after the NCAAs end.

    “I was a bit skeptical about doing the 200 at the (NCAA), but only because of the Trials,” said Thompson, who leads the nation with a 9.93 in the 100 and ranks second in the 200 with a personal-best of 20.18. “But then, I thought this would be a real positive thing for the team.

    “I wanted to do it because I’m definitely a team man. I wanted to do it for all coach Shaver and the program has done for me. I owe it to the program. I’m physically capable of doing both, so I’m ready to win the title.”

    Shaver said the decision was strictly Thompson’s after he noted the Tigers had a shot at the title. After laying the NCAA schedule out, Shaver said it didn’t take long before he received a text message from his star sprinter.

    “The message said, ‘Let’s go for the team title,’ ” Shaver said.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by EPelle
    Refering to his hypothyroidism , classified as an injury. "Injury" goes back to high school, when Rupp finished third at Footlocker ("I haven't gotten sick a lot, which has been a problem for me in the past.").

    Question remains: Do you run a guy wild at an NCAA indoor championship - a guy who is a strength runner, but who has had "injury" issues in the past? Rupp supposedly wanted to run more if he could.
    No, I don't think a coach should run an elite athlete into the ground, but that coach also shouldn't forget who pays his/her salary and why they're paying him/her. If the DMR was the last event of the NCAA outdoors instead of the 4x400 in June, and Oregon needed a win (10 points) in order to win the team title, would you sit a guy like Rupp if he was already tired from a 5/10 double, but he was still better than the alternative? The point I'm making is that the final day of the NCAA team championship is like the seventh game of the World Series, when managers are willing to use the entire pitching staff, including players who have pitched a complete game the night before. Furthermore, its not like the coach has to do any conjoling of the athlete in those situations; to the contrary, it's always the athlete demanding that he/she be allowed to run that extra race. As Rupp said last Friday night, "Just Give Me the Baton".

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Foot Locker was 4½ years ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • EPelle
    replied
    Refering to his hypothyroidism , classified as an injury. "Injury" goes back to high school, when Rupp finished third at Footlocker ("I haven't gotten sick a lot, which has been a problem for me in the past.").

    Question remains: Do you run a guy wild at an NCAA indoor championship - a guy who is a strength runner, but who has had "injury" issues in the past? Rupp supposedly wanted to run more if he could.

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Is Rupp really "injury prone?" I recall he had a routine knee surgery between seasons awhile back, but I don't recall his ever missing a major meet with injury.

    I'm guessing that because he performs in the fishbowl that's Eugene--and has the voluble Salazar as a coach--that every time he sniffles we hear about it and that may have created an image of a fragile creature that doesn't necessarily exist.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by EPelle
    Whole apples and half-eaten ones, actually.

    Using Rupp as an example of not winning the 2008 team title is as useful(less) as his having run three events at NCAA indoors in my opinion, as he is injury-prone. Was the title already secure prior to the DM? Would anyone else in the 4.01-4.03 split range have secured enough points for Oregon to win, nevertheless?
    As a matter of fact, the title was far from secure when Rupp ran the DMR since it took place on day 1. If the DMR had been the final event on day 2, you might have a point.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cyril
    replied
    Originally posted by EPelle
    How would this race had played out with Fernandez in it? That question has not yet been raised as far as I can tell. Had Fernandez concentrated on 3.000m only, would the swift early pace Rupp put up been to Fernandez advantage? Winning time for (Rupp or Fernandez)?
    That would have been a great race. I am looking forward to watching these two go at it outdoors. I think Rupp has the advantage, but Fernandez is closing the gap pretty quickly.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zat0pek
    replied
    Originally posted by dj
    Nobody has done it. Suleiman Nyambui came closest in 1980-81. UTEP pulled the triple team win, and Nyambui won CC, the indoor Mile and outdoor 5/10. But he lost the indoor 2M to Doug Padilla.
    Has it been done at any other level (NAIA, DII, DIII, etc.)?

    Leave a comment:


  • EPelle
    replied
    How would this race had played out with Fernandez in it? That question has not yet been raised as far as I can tell. Had Fernandez concentrated on 3.000m only, would the swift early pace Rupp put up been to Fernandez advantage? Winning time for (Rupp or Fernandez)?

    Leave a comment:


  • EPelle
    replied
    So, *** should really read ***(+1); **, **(+1), osv.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X