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  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by Helen S
    Light weight does not always mean not "fat". When I coached HS, I had a real slow thin girl. It all made sense when her body fat measured out at 30%- she had virtually no muscle, and was "fat". That was an extreme, but clearly makes my point.
    That's what I refer to as a 'jiggly girl'. I have had a few (zero boys) and they're easy to spot on the first day of practice. I always steer them to the distance coach, not just to get rid of them, but I think that's what they need most of all, conditioning.

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  • Helen S
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by Taliban
    I think he was implying American kids are fat. That was so random.
    I've got almost 100 on my track team. Not one is obese by any standard. Most of them are downright skinny. My boy PVers, good athletes, are 115, 120, 125, and 160 (6').
    Light weight does not always mean not "fat". When I coached HS, I had a real slow thin girl. It all made sense when her body fat measured out at 30%- she had virtually no muscle, and was "fat". That was an extreme, but clearly makes my point.

    Leave a comment:


  • eldrick
    replied
    there is a lot of skew because wind ( max 2m/s ) can affect lj & tj by both ~ 2%, which shows up much more dramatically in tj ( e.g.17.00 with 2m/s = ~ 17.34 )

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  • 26mi235
    replied
    It seems to me that there might be a bit of change as the distance increases. It is not too difficult to be well over 2:1 (or 2.141:1) with short distances because the 3:1 ratio of 'steps'. However, the further the jumps that more the landing forces and the more the initial speed matters, and the attendant loss of speed over the multiple jumps.

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  • eldrick
    replied
    the tj is very competitive in world terms

    i have a feeling that we have seen an exodus of talent to tj from lj at a young age worlwide because it may have been deemed they weren't good enough at the time to be world class at lj - some of the galz need to go back...

    i'm going by

    TJ = ( Pi - 1) * LJ

    ( if you try long enough off one to the other without any change in speed/strength - just improving technique )

    -> for "basic"

    6.00m = 12.84m
    6.25m = 13.38m
    6.50m = 13.92m
    6.75m = 14.45m
    7.00m = 14.99m
    7.25m = 15.52m
    7.50m = 16.06m

    7.75m = 16.59m
    8.00m = 17.13m
    8.25m = 17.66m
    8.50m = 18.20m
    8.75m = 18.73m
    9.00m = 19.27m

    Leave a comment:


  • Taliban
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by Taliban
    I think he was implying American kids are fat. That was so random.
    I've got almost 100 on my track team. Not one is obese by any standard. Most of them are downright skinny. My boy PVers, good athletes, are 115, 120, 125, and 160 (6').
    Americans in general not track athletes. I don't have any overweight kids on my team either.

    Leave a comment:


  • lonewolf
    replied
    Originally posted by bad hammy
    Didn't someone around here propose that he could tell good women triple jump potential by the size of their butts?
    I don't know what the correlation is between butt size and TJ ability but I have noted several times that, based strictly on physical conformity, the least likely looking winner frequently is broad based.

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  • bad hammy
    replied
    Didn't someone around here propose that he could tell good women triple jump potential by the size of their butts?

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by Taliban
    I think he was implying American kids are fat. That was so random.
    I've got almost 100 on my track team. Not one is obese by any standard. Most of them are downright skinny. My boy PVers, good athletes, are 115, 120, 125, and 160 (6').

    Leave a comment:


  • Taliban
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by Barto
    America kids like to eat too much.
    ??!! That pretty much applies to every other event except throws. Plus I doubt we're the only nation with kids who like to eat (and can get their hands on food). :roll:
    I think he was implying American kids are fat. That was so random.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by Barto
    America kids like to eat too much.
    ??!! That pretty much applies to every other event except throws. Plus I doubt we're the only nation with kids who like to eat (and can get their hands on food). :roll:

    Leave a comment:


  • Barto
    replied
    America kids like to eat too much.

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  • bigweb03
    replied
    You truly have to love TJ to make that next step. If you don't develop good technique you have a potential lifetime filled with back pain.

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  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by BCBaroo
    Yeah, there's a lot of great triple jumpers playing volleyball, soccer, and basketball, too.

    Ya gotta admit, triple jump is a pretty esoteric event...even once we've got them away from th'other sports.
    The odd thing is that we have plenty of good HSers to cull from. Is it that easy to get to 40' on mostly natural talent by age 18 and then so hard to get them the rest of the way with good training and coaching?

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  • BCBaroo
    replied
    Yeah, there's a lot of great triple jumpers playing volleyball, soccer, and basketball, too.

    Ya gotta admit, triple jump is a pretty esoteric event...even once we've got them away from th'other sports.

    Leave a comment:

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