Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Alan Webb is learning how to race.

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Alan Webb is learning how to race.

    Alan won his second race of the outdoor season at drake.Although both times were slow it is more important for him I think to get some wins under his belt.I think he will go under 3:50 this year.

  • #2
    Think the "learning how to race" thing is valuable. Always thought that was a weakness of Mary Decker. Seemed she was never comfortable unless out in the lead.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Bruce Kritzler
      Think the "learning how to race" thing is valuable. Always that that was a weakness of Mary Decker. Seemed she was never comfortable unless out in the lead.
      Yes, but she had a pretty good lead-out double in '83 (did she lead both through the end?).

      Comment


      • #4
        This concept of Webb "learning" to race is a tiny bit amusing. It has been 8 (eight) years since his 3:53 as a HS senior, after all.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by kuha
          This concept of Webb "learning" to race is a tiny bit amusing. It has been 8 (eight) years since his 3:53 as a HS senior, after all.
          I guess the assumption is that many observers feel he may not yet have learned how to 'race', ie successfully mixed it up with runners of his quality. An objective consideration of his body of work might support this.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you bad hammy,you got the point of what I was trying to say.It doent matter if you run for 20 years,racing is an art,and not everyone knows how to paint.

            Comment


            • #7
              I don't think it's matter of knowing or not knowing how to race, I've always gotten the impression that he grossly overestimates his physical capabilities and fitness sometimes. He makes 'bold' moves that often don't pay off the way he's expecting them too. He often seems perplexed after races, as if he's thinking, "why didn't that work?"

              That said, very, very few of us are in any position to second-guess what he does in races, now are we?

              Now Borza, on the other hand, . . . :twisted:

              Comment


              • #8
                Finally.

                An Alan Webb thread.
                The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bad hammy
                  Originally posted by kuha
                  This concept of Webb "learning" to race is a tiny bit amusing. It has been 8 (eight) years since his 3:53 as a HS senior, after all.
                  I guess the assumption is that many observers feel he may not yet have learned how to 'race', ie successfully mixed it up with runners of his quality. An objective consideration of his body of work might support this.
                  8 years after his 3:53 and the AR holder to boot, and we are supposed to get excited about his ability to race. It really shows how low expectations are.

                  If you really wanted to know how to race, follow Ryan Hall who just started fast at Boston last Monday.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    All of what you said marlow,has to do with racing.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 26mi235
                      Originally posted by Bruce Kritzler
                      Think the "learning how to race" thing is valuable. Always that that was a weakness of Mary Decker. Seemed she was never comfortable unless out in the lead.
                      Yes, but she had a pretty good lead-out double in '83 (did she lead both through the end?).
                      In both the 1500 and the 3000, she took the lead, but did not lead the entire race. In both events, she lost the lead but eventually won.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yes,but leading from the front is harder than anything,and is an art few can do.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by williamwindhamjr
                          Yes,but leading from the front is harder than anything,and is an art few can do.
                          I agree it is harder, guts are needed, for sure, but why is it an art, I don't see it?

                          Probably better to keep this to the other thread you started though.
                          http://mb.trackandfieldnews.com/discuss ... hp?t=35110

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by williamwindhamjr
                            Yes,but leading from the front is harder than anything,and is an art few can do.
                            Is leading a race equal to being at the front in a race where the competition may be uncomfortable with that stride-for-stride pace? Would it not be equally and oppositely as difficult to follow a race where the race splits are faster than one can handle? If you run your own race, no matter where the competition is on the track, you'll have a better chance of reducing the amount of difficulty placed on yourself, no?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If "learning to race" is what he is really after ( I doubt it,) then he needs to do it in Europe against guys who are his racing equals (or betters.) The guy who really needs to do this, this year, is Manzano. Ditto for Lomong.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X