Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Who is Alonso Edward(s)?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Who is Alonso Edward(s)?

    ...and what is he doing running 9.97?

    OK, so he had a bit of wind. But he beat a decent field in Texas today, and I've never heard of him.

    I'll see if I can look him up, but I'm sure someone on here can post some PRs before I can find anything...

  • #2
    Hmm... he's already run 10.03w earlier this year. But before that, it looks like his best was 10.28 from 2007.

    And he's only 19. :!:

    Comment


    • #3
      he was recruited by nebraska but now at barton cc was impressive at the texas relays and mcdonell at arkansas, also was outstanding as ajr. in 2007, i wonder if he'll still wind up at nebraska. whoever the coaches are at barton they sure are doing agreat job ,looking at the results of the texas twilite

      Comment


      • #4
        you can check out the race and interview on flotrack

        Comment


        • #5
          and he is a Panamanian., I believe.

          Comment


          • #6
            He is Panamanian. Won the South American Junior 100m for them in 2007.

            Comment


            • #7
              In watching the video of the race I am struck by the extreme wind conditions I see of the US and Texas flags which are not the cheap, light-weight variety flapping at full mast as the camera zooms in on the scoreboard.

              Plus I found it interesting that in the first 4 heats the wind registered 2.3 on 3 and a 2.5 on the other. What are the odds of a 2.3 to register 3 out of 4 races.

              The race was a fast one no doubt but something is just not right with the whole affair. Same as with heat 1 of the men's 200. Video so far only shows athletes already out of the blocks so not all info is available but I have my doubts.

              Over the past couple of years I have become extremely skeptical of wind readings in 100 meters on a variety of fronts.

              Last weekend I saw races in Eugene recorded as tailwinds in which candy wrappers flew down the track from the finish line to the starting line! I was standing on the track by the finish line at one point and had the hood of my rain jacket blown quickly off as I looked at the scoreboard and the wind again registered a tailwind when it was clearly a head wind.

              This is the same wind guage that came under scrutiny at the Trials. I remember last year at the Trials walking past the wind gauge in Eugene and being struck by the fact the box was not parallel to the ground by at least an inch variance from the left side to the right side.

              I also have noted in stadiums with large stands close to lane 8 to have widely different wind amounts in lane 8 from lane 1.

              I really think that the only "fair" way to measure wind is to place gauges above the track on wires about 9 feet off the ground or to use 3-4 gauges at 20/40/60/80 or 25/50/75 meters on BOTH sides of the track and then average all 6.

              I certainly think the IAAF should allocate funds to do some tests of this nature to see just how much difference in readings each machine would have. I do believe the reason this has never happened is many decades ago the decision was made to have a single gauge and even though everyone knows the current method is flawed no one wants to open the huge can of worms that would come with admitting the past wind readings are nothing but bs.

              Comment


              • #8
                At the '72 Trials in Eugene (different stadium configuration then, with a high wall right next to lane 8) they put wind gauges on both sides of the track, with the inner one official, as it should have been. The differential in readings from the two sides was stunning.

                And the way the buildings sit in Modesto, I'm convinced that nearly all the great long jumping there was illegally wind aided in the sense that at the start of the runup there was a massive tailwind, but by the time you got to the gauge it was in a shadow and the effect dropped off markedly.

                But pragmatic considerations are going to rule out any change in current methodology; for most meets it's hard enough to find one competent wind-guague operator (or even the wherewithal to purchase one), let alone setting up multiples.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by westcoasttiger
                  I really think that the only "fair" way to measure wind is to place gauges above the track on wires about 9 feet off the ground or to use 3-4 gauges at 20/40/60/80 or 25/50/75 meters on BOTH sides of the track and then average all 6.
                  Who's going to pay for that? How much time, effort, and cost will it take to string those things up before every track meet and then take them down? How about the hardware and software needed to transmit the readings from all those gauges to wherever they'll be read? How many meets in the world are ever likely to use this method, even if it were shown to be possible and accurate?

                  I just don't see the alphabet guys passing a rule that can't be enforced without significant costs at 99+% of the track meets in the world or the US. A wind gauge is relatively cheap and very portable. What you are proposing may be fair, but it does not seem at all practical.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Who runs 9ft off the ground?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      nobody, and that's the point; they would need to be well clear of the runners.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Every track should have a middle lane specifically for the wind gauge :P

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gh
                          But pragmatic considerations are going to rule out any change in current methodology; for most meets it's hard enough to find one competent wind-gauge operator (or even the wherewithal to purchase one), let alone setting up multiples.
                          Exhibit 1, Mexico City

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The placement, orientation and height of wind gauges are clearly specified in the rules and are among the more sensible rules.
                            They are placed belly high at the approximate mid-point for each event and average the wind speed over a specific period of time for each event. That is about all you can ask for.
                            Anyone who has ever attended a track meet can observe that the flags are sometimes pointing in a different direction from the perceived direction at ground level. The can even be blowing in different directions at opposite ends or sides of the stadium
                            The configuration of the venue, stands, fences, buildings, etc can cause a race or run-up to be into a head wind or tail wind at both ends and create a dead lull in the middle. Or you can have a tail wind at the end of the runway and hit a head wind at the board.. or vice versa..
                            I have worked one stadium many times that owing to the unique placement of the stands and high wind baffles across the open ends, if the wind is from a certain direction there is a head wind around the entire track. If it is from another direction, there is a tail wind all the way around. I know those are unintended consequence of good intentions but there it is.
                            The moment to moment variation in wind speed and even direction is surprising if you sit and watch a wind gauge. It is no mystery that a jumper may catch a 0.0 sandwiched between 4s and 5s. Or an abnormal high wind in a generally windless competition. Luck of the draw.
                            Operating a wind gauge is not rocket science but it does require paying attention and concentration to do and record it correctly and being synchronized with the flight coordinator to ensure you are recording for the correct jumper.. Basic but important, remember to turn it on and take the caps off before the event starts and round UP to next tenth.
                            It is an imperfect world but wind gauges are not the biggest culprits.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Legal PR and Panamanian record 10.09 for Edward tonight, finishing 2nd to Ryan Bailey (10.07) at JUCO champs.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X