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  • sub-27:00 in Shizuoka

    from K. Ken Nakamura

    Shizuoka International meet on May 3
    10000m
    1)  Josphat Muchiri Ndambiri  (KEN)  26:57.36 
    2)  Martin Irungu Mathathi (KEN)  26:59.88
    3)  Nicholas Makau (KEN)  28:07.39 
    4)  Samuel Ndungu (KEN)  28:08.15
    5)  Micah Njeru (KEN)  28:21.59 
    6)  Daisuke Shimizu  28:44.75

  • #2
    Re: sub-27:00 in Shizuoka

    Originally posted by gh
    from K. Ken Nakamura

    Shizuoka International meet on May 3
    10000m
    1)  Josphat Muchiri Ndambiri  (KEN)  26:57.36 
    2)  Martin Irungu Mathathi (KEN)  26:59.88
    3)  Nicholas Makau (KEN)  28:07.39 
    4)  Samuel Ndungu (KEN)  28:08.15
    5)  Micah Njeru (KEN)  28:21.59 
    6)  Daisuke Shimizu  28:44.75
    As a person who does not follow TF that closely any more, I am amazed at how many people (most unknown to me) run fast times. Sub 27 still means something to people who were totally shocked by Clarke's 27:39 and change back in 1965.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: sub-27:00 in Shizuoka

      Originally posted by catson52
      Sub 27 still means something
      I thought that a laughable understatement till I looked it up and was shocked to see that 28 guys have run 26 and change!! :shock:

      Comment


      • #4
        I used to think running sub 13:30 or 13:20 was still something good until I realised that Bekele closed his 26:17 in 13:09 for the last 5k!

        Comment


        • #5
          And opened in 13:08
          Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Powell
            And opened in 13:08
            Each half faster than any pre 1978 5K, and about a minute faster than the record pre 1942.

            Comment


            • #7
              So true...13:08 and 13:09 back to back. I never would have thought back in my day of distance running competing (1967-1972) that anyone could ever do that! A 13:08 5000m back then would have been a remarkable WR...

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: sub-27:00 in Shizuoka

                Originally posted by Marlow
                Originally posted by catson52
                Sub 27 still means something
                I thought that a laughable understatement till I looked it up and was shocked to see that 28 guys have run 26 and change!! :shock:
                A quick look at the all-time top 200 performances, suggests about 5 by persons born outside the African continent.

                Comment


                • #9
                  A further issue is that the sub-27 gang is overpopulated with folks who come across as pretty "flash in the pan". Beyond the big Ethopian names (Bekele, the two Gebs, Sihine) and Tergat (and Ondieki?), I would struggle to name any of the others.

                  I guess infrequent racing over the distance doesn't help either...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The fastest 10,000 by a non-African runner is still the 27:08.23 by Arturo Barrios in 1989.

                    Fastest by a US born citizen is 27:20.56 Mark Nenow in 1986.

                    With the apparent efficacy of EPO, one might think a non-African would have run faster than 27:08 by now.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ed gee
                      The fastest 10,000 by a non-African runner is still the 27:08.23 by Arturo Barrios in 1989.

                      Fastest by a US born citizen is 27:20.56 Mark Nenow in 1986.

                      With the apparent efficacy of EPO, one might think a non-African would have run faster than 27:08 by now.
                      The top 20 non-African-borns really does look like an ancient history lesson:

                      27:08.23 Arturo Barrios MEX 1989
                      27:12.47 António Pinto POR 1999
                      27:13.81 Fernando Mamede POR 1984
                      27:14.44 Fabián Roncero ESP 1998
                      27:16.50 Salvatore Antibo ITA 1989

                      27:17.48 Carlos Lopes POR 1984
                      27:18.14 Jon Brown GBR 1998
                      27:18.59 Juan Armando Quintanilla MEX 1994
                      27:20.56 Mark Nenow USA 1986
                      27:21.53 Dieter Baumann GER 1997

                      27:22.20 José Rios ESP 2000
                      27:22.78 António Martins FRA 1992
                      27:23.06 Eamonn Martin GBR 1988
                      27:23.18 Vincent Rousseau BEL 1993
                      27:24.16 Francesco Panetta ITA 1989

                      27:24.95 Werner Schildhauer GER 1983
                      27:25.61 Alberto Salazar USA 1982
                      27:26.00 Hansjörg Kunze GDR 1988
                      27:26.29 Kamiel Maase NED 2002
                      27:26.95 Alex Hagelsteens BEL 1982

                      Source: http://www.alltime-athletics.com/m_10kok.htm

                      Complete retreat?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The 5000m looks somewhat more contemporary

                        12:55.76 Craig Mottram AUS 2004
                        12:58.21 Bob Kennedy USA 1996
                        13:00.41 David Moorcroft GBR 1982
                        13:01.72 Dieter Baumann GER 1995
                        13:02.86 António Pinto POR 1998

                        13:03.76 Stéphane Franke GER 1995
                        13:03.93 Mark Carroll IRL 1998
                        13:04.64 Alberto García ESP 1998
                        13:04.90 Matt Tegenkamp USA 2006
                        13:05.59 Salvatore Antibo ITA 1990

                        13:06.39 Marius Bakken NOR 2004
                        13:06.76 Francesco Panetta ITA 1993
                        13:07.10 Alistair Cragg IRL 2007
                        13:07.34 Enrique Molina ESP 1997
                        13:07.54 Markus Ryffel SUI 1984

                        13:07.59 José Rios ESP 2000
                        13:07.70 António Leitão POR 1982
                        13:07.79 Arturo Barrios MEX 1989
                        13:08.30 Anacleto Jiménez ESP 1997
                        13:08.44 Manuel Pancorbo ESP 1998

                        I am a little uncertain about the background of this Belgian:
                        13:04.06 Monder Rizki BEL 2008

                        Pancorbo's performance is #719 on the all-time list (http://www.alltime-athletics.com/m_5000ok.htm)

                        Hagelsteens' was #313

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ed gee
                          The fastest 10,000 by a non-African runner is still the 27:08.23 by Arturo Barrios in 1989.

                          Fastest by a US born citizen is 27:20.56 Mark Nenow in 1986.

                          With the apparent efficacy of EPO, one might think a non-African would have run faster than 27:08 by now.
                          How many top-level (5000/10,000/M) non-Africans have been nabbed for EPO. There was an Irish guy who went from 29-30 to 27, I think, but he was not a top-level guy, really, as he was middling before and after. Eddy H was nabbed, but he also (and his pupil) were not really top level.

                          Is this because they have almost universally avoided detection or because usage is either at low levels (and hence not too much of assistance) or uncommon.

                          Now maybe in sprinting drugs can bring you from 10.1 into World-class 9.9 but in distances from middling to pretty good, so that the payoffs are not very great.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 26mi235
                            [...
                            Is this because they have almost universally avoided detection or because usage is either at low levels (and hence not too much of assistance) or uncommon.

                            Now maybe in sprinting drugs can bring you from 10.1 into World-class 9.9 but in distances from middling to pretty good, so that the payoffs are not very great.
                            You don't wanna hear this, but.... paging John Entine.....

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by AS
                              13:07.10 Alistair Cragg IRL 2007
                              You're also a little uncertain about the background of the above-mentioned.

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