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IAAF should consider a zero tolerance rule on Drug Cheats!

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  • IAAF should consider a zero tolerance rule on Drug Cheats!

    After, surfing various website and seeing previous drug cheat(s) is already taking part in competitions and some is about to pop up again in Track and Field, I feel sick to my stomach. Track and field doesn't need those cheats back into the sport. IAAF/WADA need to take a tougher stand on their drug policy and make it ZERO TOLERANCE. No more second and third chances. ONE POSITIVE and you out for good no matter what country he/she is from/representing. Doing this will go a long way in helping clean up the sport get rid of cheats for good. Maybe they will think twice about cheating when they know there will be no SECOND CHANCE.

  • #2
    I agree totally!

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    • #3
      Couldn't disagree more.

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      • #4
        European courts ("right to work" statutes) previously made the IAAF strike down 4-year bans as not workable; hard to imagine a lifetime stricture getting the pass, although I suppose it's all in the wording somehow.

        But do recall that the EU has already forced WADA to reconsider some of its testing policies.

        As abhorrent as doping might be, all human beans retain some elemental rights.

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        • #5
          Re: IAAF should consider a zero tolerance rule on Drug Chea

          Originally posted by Sportsfanx1
          After, surfing various website and seeing previous drug cheat(s) is already taking part in competitions and some is about to pop up again in Track and Field, I feel sick to my stomach. Track and field doesn't need those cheats back into the sport. IAAF/WADA need to take a tougher stand on their drug policy and make it ZERO TOLERANCE. No more second and third chances. ONE POSITIVE and you out for good no matter what country he/she is from/representing. Doing this will go a long way in helping clean up the sport get rid of cheats for good. Maybe they will think twice about cheating when they know there will be no SECOND CHANCE.
          This wonderful utopian attitude would be great if testing had no cockups in it. But, unfortunately the testing procedure still has many flaws.

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          • #6
            Everyone deserves a second chance. People being people don't always take it, but it should be offered nonetheless.

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            • #7
              Let the athletes get on with it. Sucess and possible stardom / super-stardom are always going to be strong reasons to make people do whatever it takes, so why not let them? If we are worried about health, have the WADA put all the money they claim to be spending on Drug Tests and put them towards regular check-ups across the board. That way any exisiting or developing conditions are more likely to be identified, there would be none of this ridiculous "Witch-Hunting" and none of my tax revenue would be spent on spent on deciding whether Dwain Chambers should be allowed to run anywhere.
              This is hardly a new idea.

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              • #8
                The IAAF should adopt the same policy and practice of MLB, the NBA, and the NFL. No more and no less.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by AthleticsInBritain
                  Everyone deserves a second chance.
                  Do they really? Some would say once a cheat, always a cheat. There is always more than one side of any argument.
                  Regards,
                  toyracer

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dave
                    The IAAF should adopt the same policy and practice of MLB, the NBA, and the NFL. No more and no less.
                    Not at all. The professional sports should adopt the policies and practices prescribed by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Until they do, they lack credibility and I, for one, will pay no attention to them at all.

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                    • #11
                      why would they want to shed fans/credibility like we are?

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                      • #12
                        Where I work we had a period where 7 people tested positive for drugs over the course of 2 months.

                        We then went to zero tolerance which meant one strike and you're fired.

                        It was over 3 years before someone else tested positive for drugs.

                        And even then it was only one person.

                        Although I'm not suggesting it, zero tolerance has it's merits.
                        The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

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                        • #13
                          Zero tolerance equates a police state, simple as that. Nobody will argue that it has benefits as far as governance goes, but the price is enormous.
                          "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
                          by Thomas Henry Huxley

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Pego
                            Zero tolerance equates a police state, simple as that. Nobody will argue that it has benefits as far as governance goes, but the price is enormous.
                            What price?

                            The one the cheater pays?
                            The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

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                            • #15
                              I think a lot of individuals that call for a zero tolerance policy within a sport aren't willing to apply that same rule to themselves in other (non-track) aspects of their lives. If that same individual conveniently forgets to claim a monetary gift or donation on their taxes, are they willing to accept some form of LIFETIME punishment from the IRS? If those same individuals were to "float" a check just before payday - are they willing to be banned from using any bank for the rest of their lives it clears early and bounces, or would they rather pay the fee and promise to never let it happen again? If those same individuals knowingly broke speeding laws (and were caught), are they willing to forego driving privileges for the rest of your lives? If their HS freshman were caught cheating on a math test, would they think it was overly harsh to ban that kid from attending any type of public or private school for the next 4 years? Or would they prefer to see him or her fail the class, and make it up over the summer?

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