Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

a 4-inch high jump PR?

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • marknhj
    replied
    Originally posted by Dietmar239
    Most will say that HS is a time for just having fun and learning the event. However, if you expect to get a scholarship and climb the elite ladder to be noticed, you really do need to develop some proficiency as early as possible.
    That's exactly right. The longer a coach lets an athlete get away with lousy technique the more difficult it becomes to correct. And, way too many in my opinion focus on minor detail, rather than first making sure fundamentals are sound. There's always room for fine-tuning as an athlete matures in the event, but get the basics right first.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave
    replied
    Originally posted by Dietmar239
    Originally posted by Dave
    Originally posted by Dietmar239
    Notice what that youngster said though:

    “When I went over 6-8 I felt myself bend a whole lot more than I have before. I got my head way back, and I knew that's what I had to do to get higher.”

    I don't harp on a lot of younger jumpers since it takes time to learn the event and sharpen one's technique. This example shows how beneficial it can be to employ simple improvements in one's technique. If more did this we would have a lot more HS jumpers over 7'+. Many of these ultra-talented jumpers are "sitting" over the bar because of poor coaching regarding body mechanics. Most will say that HS is a time for just having fun and learning the event. However, if you expect to get a scholarship and climb the elite ladder to be noticed, you really do need to develop some proficiency as early as possible. Not everyone will have Donald Thomas poential, but good technique can take you pretty darn far.
    next, you are going to claim that hard work matters...

    lots of even mediocre athletes have these "ah ha" moments where their technique suddenly works and the results far exceed previous experience. I hope the young man and his coaches are able to retrace what happened and figure out how to repeat it without too much frustration. I can imagine his next meet being 6'6 or 6'8" and frustration developing.
    I don't think you're feelin me. I'm just tired of people seeing someone with great jumping ability, but lousy technique and everyone tells their coaches, "don't change a thing or you'll ruin them", etc.

    I saw a guy jump 6'10" before and he cleared the bar in an absolute fetal ball. Since he had such great leaping ability his coach decided not to tweak his technique at all until he got to college. Now, imagine trying to untrain that. Guess what? None of the big colleges took him. Hmm, I'm glad Stefan Holm's father didn't think like that.
    We are very close to the same perspective.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dietmar239
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave
    Originally posted by Dietmar239
    Notice what that youngster said though:

    “When I went over 6-8 I felt myself bend a whole lot more than I have before. I got my head way back, and I knew that's what I had to do to get higher.”

    I don't harp on a lot of younger jumpers since it takes time to learn the event and sharpen one's technique. This example shows how beneficial it can be to employ simple improvements in one's technique. If more did this we would have a lot more HS jumpers over 7'+. Many of these ultra-talented jumpers are "sitting" over the bar because of poor coaching regarding body mechanics. Most will say that HS is a time for just having fun and learning the event. However, if you expect to get a scholarship and climb the elite ladder to be noticed, you really do need to develop some proficiency as early as possible. Not everyone will have Donald Thomas poential, but good technique can take you pretty darn far.
    next, you are going to claim that hard work matters...

    lots of even mediocre athletes have these "ah ha" moments where their technique suddenly works and the results far exceed previous experience. I hope the young man and his coaches are able to retrace what happened and figure out how to repeat it without too much frustration. I can imagine his next meet being 6'6 or 6'8" and frustration developing.
    I don't think you're feelin me. I'm just tired of people seeing someone with great jumping ability, but lousy technique and everyone tells their coaches, "don't change a thing or you'll ruin them", etc.

    I saw a guy jump 6'10" before and he cleared the bar in an absolute fetal ball. Since he had such great leaping ability his coach decided not to tweak his technique at all until he got to college. Now, imagine trying to untrain that. Guess what? None of the big colleges took him. Hmm, I'm glad Stefan Holm's father didn't think like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave
    replied
    Originally posted by Dietmar239
    Notice what that youngster said though:

    “When I went over 6-8 I felt myself bend a whole lot more than I have before. I got my head way back, and I knew that's what I had to do to get higher.”

    I don't harp on a lot of younger jumpers since it takes time to learn the event and sharpen one's technique. This example shows how beneficial it can be to employ simple improvements in one's technique. If more did this we would have a lot more HS jumpers over 7'+. Many of these ultra-talented jumpers are "sitting" over the bar because of poor coaching regarding body mechanics. Most will say that HS is a time for just having fun and learning the event. However, if you expect to get a scholarship and climb the elite ladder to be noticed, you really do need to develop some proficiency as early as possible. Not everyone will have Donald Thomas poential, but good technique can take you pretty darn far.
    next, you are going to claim that hard work matters...

    lots of even mediocre athletes have these "ah ha" moments where their technique suddenly works and the results far exceed previous experience. I hope the young man and his coaches are able to retrace what happened and figure out how to repeat it without too much frustration. I can imagine his next meet being 6'6 or 6'8" and frustration developing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dietmar239
    replied
    Notice what that youngster said though:

    “When I went over 6-8 I felt myself bend a whole lot more than I have before. I got my head way back, and I knew that's what I had to do to get higher.”

    I don't harp on a lot of younger jumpers since it takes time to learn the event and sharpen one's technique. This example shows how beneficial it can be to employ simple improvements in one's technique. If more did this we would have a lot more HS jumpers over 7'+. Many of these ultra-talented jumpers are "sitting" over the bar because of poor coaching regarding body mechanics. Most will say that HS is a time for just having fun and learning the event. However, if you expect to get a scholarship and climb the elite ladder to be noticed, you really do need to develop some proficiency as early as possible. Not everyone will have Donald Thomas poential, but good technique can take you pretty darn far.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave
    replied
    so is it the shoes or did the HJ become cool for high schoolers?

    Leave a comment:


  • marknhj
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman
    There's a story now on the front page about a high school kid from North Carolina who just improved his PR from 6-6 to 7-2 1/2 in one meet!!!!
    That definitely is worth a :shock: or ten!

    However, nothing compares to Povarnitsyn's 14cm improvement to 2.40m. That still deserves a page load....

    Leave a comment:


  • 26mi235
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman
    There's a story now on the front page about a high school kid from North Carolina who just improved his PR from 6-6 to 7-2 1/2 in one meet!!!!
    That is pretty close to what Donald Thomas did, although his early meets from HS days had him jump 6'6" or so, the up to ~7'3" (If we count official heights and the early stuff wasn't official, the 'delta' is 7'3". :lol: )

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    There's a story now on the front page about a high school kid from North Carolina who just improved his PR from 6-6 to 7-2 1/2 in one meet!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Dietmar239
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman
    Originally posted by 26mi235
    Was it Manson that had the meet of envy at World Juniors where he opened (conservatively?) and made that height and the next ten on his first attempt? I think he stopped there; what a meet. He must have had a sequence of PRs when doing this.

    O O O O O O O O O O O ppp
    He had four PR's that day. His best before the World Juniors had been 2.24. He cleared 2.25, 2.27. 2.29, and 2.31 in Kingston. It was quite an amazing display. His PR improvement, though, was "only" 7cm, which is less than 3 inches.
    Although, that's a perfect example as to why some PR's are not all that remarkable. Manson would notoriously hold back in high school. He would admittedly do enough to win and wouldn't really push himself to higher heights. If he had, I think he may have been at least in the 2.28m range or higher prior to his AJR.

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by 26mi235
    Was it Manson that had the meet of envy at World Juniors where he opened (conservatively?) and made that height and the next ten on his first attempt? I think he stopped there; what a meet. He must have had a sequence of PRs when doing this.

    O O O O O O O O O O O ppp
    He had four PR's that day. His best before the World Juniors had been 2.24. He cleared 2.25, 2.27. 2.29, and 2.31 in Kingston. It was quite an amazing display. His PR improvement, though, was "only" 7cm, which is less than 3 inches.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dietmar239
    replied
    Sometimes you just have that perfect day where training is going well, the weather is great and you have just a little more pep in your step. Also, a rhythmically clapping and excited crowd can make a world of difference. I remember Austin saying that was the main reason for his 2.40m in Zurich.

    Leave a comment:


  • EPelle
    replied
    Which spurred on Paklin to improve his outdoor best 8cm to 2.41m and break the world record not a month later.

    Leave a comment:


  • Powell
    replied
    Rudolf Povarnitsyn improved by 14 cm when he set the WR of 2.40 in Donetsk in 1985.

    Leave a comment:


  • EPelle
    replied
    Holm improved his outdoor personal (2.26m) best seven cm (2.8 in) at Eurajoki (Fin) on 1998-07-18.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X