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  • kyds
    replied
    Re: edwin moses come back

    Edwin, I ran into you some time ago while living in Tucson. You were there--I think--during the Willy Williams meet. I am now living in Atlanta and think it's great that you still have the drive. I'm a huge track fan and have been since the days of Houston McTear, Steve Williams. You know, back when track was always on. I don't even know some of the guys competing today and those that I do are so Me oriented. The sport just isn't the same and the technique aspect of track which used to be so beautiful is gone. Now they are worried about their shoes and making sure their shades don't fall off. They need some of the guys who set the tone to come and show them or remind them that they have a duty to keep the sport clean and spread the word that Track and Field is a beautiful sport to watch and participate in. I wish you well and all of your efforts. See it through no matter the outcome. We all have goals, you've just told the world yours and they can't stand that they are just sitting around looking at everyone else pursue their goals.

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  • straddle
    started a topic edwin moses come back

    edwin moses come back

    i think you people know what exactly he said here is a remainder


    Joined: 12 Nov 2003
    Posts: 319
    Location: Waukesha, WI
    Posted: Thu Jan 15, 2004 9:16 am Post subject: Edwin Moses discusses his comeback

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Exploring the power of sport
    By Ed Moses

    It is more than four months since I announced during last summer's World
    Championships in Paris that I was going back into training. The aim is
    the same as it always was - to reach a standard where I can run the 400
    metres hurdles in 50.50sec and hopefully compete at the US Olympic
    Trials in July.

    I hope I explained at the time that this wasn't a comeback in the
    accepted sense of the word. I have no intention of running against young
    guys or, even less, of following the backside of the world champion,
    Felix Sanchez, in races.

    No, this is about exploring the power sport has to change lives. This is
    a personal challenge for me that, hopefully, will show others what can
    be done through sport. Of course, there were those who thought I was mad
    to even try to step back on a track, but then they perhaps did not
    understand what I was trying to do. The negatives came mainly from
    people in track and field and, from a personal point of view, that's why
    this sport is not doing as well as it can.

    The first thing people asked was: "How long would it take you now to run
    the 400m hurdles?" I don't know and, for the time being at least, I have
    no intention of finding out.

    I've always kept myself in good shape but, at 48, I have to take things
    slowly. The hurdling will take care of itself. I can do that in my
    sleep. The key to my success will be in making sure I'm fit and flexible
    enough to start the serious business of hurdling.

    Things are going pretty well. I've moved from my home in Atlanta to my
    place in southern California to take advantage of the good weather. It's
    also where I have a team of good people around me: my doctor,
    physiotherapist and orthopaedic surgeon. My days are spent on
    conditioning work. I have to get in shape to run hard and that means a
    lot of stretching and cross-country running.

    I run up to four miles on the local beaches and golf courses. It might
    not seem like a long way, but it is for a sprinter who runs on his toes.

    I have aches and pains all the time and I'm feeling all my old injuries
    again. I'm even feeling an old muscle pull that happened while I was at
    high school and was something that gave me problems throughout my
    career.

    It's a case of going slowly - the danger is always of permanent injury.
    I have to take care of myself because I won't have time to recover if
    something goes seriously wrong.

    It will be March or April before I'll think about getting on the track
    and hurdling but things will take as long as they take. I'm not
    hurrying. I don't even let my mind dwell on how things might go this
    summer. That would only make me anxious.

    I've already had my first race invitation. I was asked to race over 400m
    flat in Jamaica in February, but I had to turn it down. It's too soon.

    But so far, so good. The plan is on track. The goal is 50.50sec and
    that's not going to change. It could even come down to 50.30
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