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Do college coaches burn out our athletes?

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  • #16
    Re: Do college coaches burn out our athletes?

    Try convincing a school who is giving you a scholarship that you want to skip a season each year. It won't happen, but if you have another championship to compete in and still are around for the conference championship meet, then maybe they will go for it.

    As a distance runner who is on scholarship at a university in a major conference you are expected to run cross country, indoor track and outdoor track. Can't do it or won't and they'll get someone else unless you are in the top 1 or 2% of college track athletes.

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    • #17
      Re: Do college coaches burn out our athletes?

      It's beyond comical to me that college coaches are blamed for racing schedules. It's the nature of the game, after all. If an athlete is receiving athletic financial assistance to go to college, then yes, the point is to run well for that team. Would you ask Roy Williams to play Rashad McCants on a lighter schedule to get ready for summer international basketball? Of course not. These kids know what the deal is when they sign-up. Run a bunch, go to school for free(or at least reduced), get to hang out with a bunch of other runners, free training facilities, cocoon of college, etc.

      If an athlete doesn't like their racing schedule, they can quit the team. The blame game is old.

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      • #18
        Let's pay our athletes

        Is a blown knee or torn hamstring worth a scholarship?

        So-called "iron Man" efforts in college is nothing but an athlete being used excessively to score points without regard to his/her health or long term personal goals.

        Unless the athletes start getting compensated for their efforts.

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        • #19
          Re: Let's pay our athletes

          See the above quote- reduced tution, room, and board, free books, uniform, shoes, meal allowances, transportation- heck, you can even sneak your laundry in with your running gear!
          Unless you are DIII- then skip the tuition, books, room and board stuff. I don't think DI athletes have a leg to stand on about getting paid. If they don't like it, let them go to a DIII school.

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          • #20
            Re: Let's pay our athletes

            And in the meantime the college makes a fortune off the backs of the student athletes: the coaches get the shoe deals, the college gets new dorms/facilities for the campus (not to mention tons of free publicity). Ahhh, but the athlete gets a scholarship. Yeah, that's fair.

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            • #21
              Re: Do college coaches burn out our athletes?

              You are absolutely correct. It is the name of the game and yes these athletes are getting thousands of dollars in education for doing smething they love. For me personally it was well worth it. I went to a good school, largely had it paid for and met alot of cool people (including my wife) and got to travel around the country. I had a blast.

              But if the question is did it help me to develop as a runner and get the most out of my athletic career the answer is absolutely not. It was not designed to and it did not. Did I know this going in? No! But would it have changed my mind if I had, probably not because getting my education was more important and this was they only way I could pay my way.

              I have no problem with college athletics, it provides a great opportunity for kids to get higher educations. But lets not kid ourselves that it is a great breeding ground for developing talent. The truth is, if you are running on scholarship in college you are good and talented but unless you are one of the best in the country at your event you will not get much individual attention as often you have only 2 or 3 coaches and 50+ athletes. If you need special training or assistance you are not likley to get it. Is the coaches fault? No, they are doing what they have to survive at their job. If you can't score them many points at conference championship time you do not warrant individual attention. They have to do it that way because their job is on the line to produce results at championships.

              College athletics is exciting and fun and a great way to pay for schooling, but it is a rather poor breeding ground for distance runners and many other track and field athletes.

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              • #22
                Re: Let's pay our athletes

                Platinum, have you ever been to a collegiate track and field meet? I guess you're too busy watching Big Monday Track and Field on ESPN to get to a meet.

                Hope you read the sarcasm here. There is not a track and field athlete in the nation that earns money for his/her school. No track programs turn a profit. They only exist because of alumni donations and TV/Bowl/NCAA Tourney money. MAYBE some football and basketball athletes have a beef. Track and field though? Give me a break.

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                • #23
                  Re: Let's pay our athletes

                  Sarcasm is overrated as an attempt to be funny. Just say what’s on your mind.

                  I was what you would call a second tier athlete: You know, winner of the unseeded section. I could score points in our conference but I would have to run a lot of races and relays to earn my keep, which I did gladly. As a long sprinter I could drop down in distance, as well as run both sprint relays. I lived up to my end of the bargain— I did what was asked of me, and graduated on time from a prestigious northeastern university.

                  Coming from a poor family I was grateful to get a scholarship, which covered room, board, books and tuition. But, for 4 years that was my sole income. My folks couldn’t afford to send money and I wasn’t allowed to work thanks to NCAA rules. I wasn’t the only one.

                  Yes track is an non-revenue generating sport, but surely some system could be put in place where kids don’t have to live below the poverty line, getting run into the ground for the greater glory ol’ state U.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Let's pay our athletes

                    Yes, that system is called not running and working part-time. You sound so jaded about running for good-ol state U. Why not quit, train and race on your own schedule, and be able to work?

                    I agree that NCAA rules should be changed so that kids can work more, but there's no reason extra suppliments on top of what athletes already get are necessary.

                    I suppose it just blows my mind how much we feel that we are entitled.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Do college coaches burn out our athletes?

                      >Try convincing a school who is giving you a scholarship that you want to skip a
                      >season each year. It won't happen, but if you have another championship to
                      >compete in and still are around for the conference championship meet, then
                      >maybe they will go for it.

                      As a distance runner who is on scholarship at a
                      >university in a major conference you are expected to run cross country, indoor
                      >track and outdoor track. Can't do it or won't and they'll get someone else
                      >unless you are in the top 1 or 2% of college track athletes.

                      That's why you go to a school with a good program where they won't overrace you. I don't understand why the COACHES do indoors. It's counterproductive to long term development (for runners running XC/indoors/outdoors). Indoors is best for athletes that aren't competing in the fall (or spring).

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                      • #26
                        Re: Do college coaches burn out our athletes?

                        They compete indoors because it's a season with a conference championship for which the university is paying money.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Do college coaches burn out our athletes?

                          It comes down to coaching. A coach should recognize the athletes who have potential to go farther than the NCAA. Truthfully, most don't. Those that do should be run on a little different schedule and sent to Europe in the summer with light racing indoor and outdoor seasons. The rest? Well, I was very happy to compete in DI at any meet but was fortunate to have a coach who developed athletes on a 4 year plan, not a season by season plan. Indoors my coach doubled or tripled EVERYBODY in meets and we ran one almost every weekend (our own track), but it was more like a hard workout than racing. We spent the rest of the week building base for outdoors without much burning speed. Times were not that fast indoors, but everyone was strong for outdoors and we stayed sharp without killing ourselves.

                          I would say there are only a handful of coaches in the country who build their athletes on a 4-5 year plan and give them the tools to move beyond the NCAA. But then again, for 99% of us that was the pinnacle of our running anyway because there is no money to be made by 2nd tier distance runners beyond college...

                          DMC
                          In the sun with a popsicle, everthing is possible

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                          • #28
                            Re: Do college coaches burn out our athletes?

                            Kevin, don't confuse entitlement with fairness.

                            The NCAA has a monopoly on the collegiate sport/entertainment industry. And it's built on the backs of kids who don't know the real deal.

                            It I were Allison Felix's dad, I'd be damned if I'd hand her over to some sprint factory fo she could run 6-7 races at Drake or Penn to make some coach look good.

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                            • #29
                              Re: Do college coaches burn out our athletes?

                              I think that athletes like Felix and Webb are a bit different than the overhwhelming majority of athletes. Not everyone can land a contract from a shoe company to fund training. I, for one, would not trade the experiences I had as a collegiate athlete to MAYBE run marginally better as a post-collegian.

                              I still don't know how a free education isn't sufficient compensation for running. I guess I always considered myself fairly lucky to be getting to run for my school whereas you may have felt differently.

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                              • #30
                                Re: Do college coaches burn out our athletes?

                                At the time I also felt fortunate to do something I loved to do, and really didn't give much thought about how unbalanced the arrangement was. Just because you love to do something doesn't mean you're supposed to get screwed to fulfill a dream.

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