Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

¶m4 x 400: Florida State 2:59.99 CL

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #91
    Originally posted by knockout
    I always assumed he would be British when it happened, but it will be nice to see a new European Record in the 400m ..... Its been 22 years which is way too long!!!!
    I was thinking the same thing - that would be nice to see - they are both fully capable of it. Down with 44.33

    Comment


    • #92
      Originally posted by rasb
      Those guys look like 2/4th's of a team that could have a shot at the medals in Berlin...
      You're surprised? Belgium were lying in second place going into the final leg in the Olympic FINAL. Jonathan split a 43 there too, Kevin a 44.25, Van Brantegem puit in a really strong leg....but they didn't have anyone else with a sub 46 pb and that cost them the medal. They went from clear second, to 5th on the last leg, choosing to put their weakest guy on anchor.

      Comment


      • #93
        Originally posted by proofs in the pudd'in
        Originally posted by knockout
        I always assumed he would be British when it happened, but it will be nice to see a new European Record in the 400m ..... Its been 22 years which is way too long!!!!
        I was thinking the same thing - that would be nice to see - they are both fully capable of it. Down with 44.33
        Euros next year will be brill, The Borlees, Rooney, Bingham, Benjamin, Gillick....all sub 44.8? Euro record in the process.

        Comment


        • #94
          [quote=guruof track]
          Originally posted by Powell
          Originally posted by "guruof track":xqn3qf5e
          How about Steve Lewis, Jeremy Wariner, Quincy Watts, Danny Everett, Butch Reynolds
          Could you please read the discussion before joining it?
          I did, you gave excuses for all the 'non success' stories, just wanted to make it CLEAR that people have succeeded running a full collegiat schedule. [/quote:xqn3qf5e]

          If you'd read it, you'd know I clearly stated I know it can be done and it has been done by multiple athletes. All I said was that's it's not easy, and historically speaking, there's a high chance of failure. I can't believe a passing remark stating such an obvious fact caused such furor here.
          Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

          Comment


          • #95
            Originally posted by EPelle
            Originally posted by Powell
            Yes, I understood that the first time you said it. My point is neither Williamson nor Haley were close to their best form of the season in August. The American 4x4 relay teams were usually good enough to win golds without all members being at their best, so relay golds don't prove much.
            Actually, in relation to this discussion, they mean a great deal. Why were the collegians on the professional relay team finals?
            Because at the national championships, which usually take place shortly after the NCAAs, they were still in peak shape. In August, not so much.
            Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

            Comment


            • #96
              Originally posted by Powell
              All I said was that's it's not easy, and historically speaking, there's a high chance of failure. I can't believe a passing remark stating such an obvious fact caused such furor here.
              However, Powell, when historical facts were narrowed down to NCAA sub-44,00 relay splits, you had a reason why nearly each of those - despite their merits - had not achieved peak status at a championship. I can't imagine you would have made the same comments about these athletes at the time they actually had won their gold medals. If they were not in peak shape in august, they are called ALTERNATES, not anchor legs (Williamson in 2004) or third-legs of a potential WR relay team. Again, with respect to these previous athletes, how many races have the Borlées run in comparison? Their chances are far superior to their predecessors.

              Who were those twins, again?

              Comment


              • #97
                Originally posted by 3a
                Originally posted by rasb
                Those guys look like 2/4th's of a team that could have a shot at the medals in Berlin...
                You're surprised? Belgium were lying in second place going into the final leg in the Olympic FINAL. Jonathan split a 43 there too, Kevin a 44.25, Van Brantegem puit in a really strong leg....but they didn't have anyone else with a sub 46 pb and that cost them the medal. They went from clear second, to 5th on the last leg, choosing to put their weakest guy on anchor.
                No, I am not surprised. The guys just looked as though they are busy taking it to a new level. I think it would be very cool to see Belgium pick up a 4 x 4 Gold in either Berlin or London. I note the competition for the medals in that event in particular (Men's 4 x 400) seems to be really tightening up. As in, to even challenge for a medal at a Meet such as the Pan-Am Games (if everybody was there), teams would have run seriously fast. That good Caribbean rum, has become good Caribbean run By the way, I know that is not a new phenomenon, or series of phenomena...

                Comment


                • #98
                  Originally posted by EPelle
                  If they were not in peak shape in august, they are called ALTERNATES, not anchor legs (Williamson in 2004) or third-legs of a potential WR relay team.
                  Well, in a word, no. If Michael Johnson had been in 44.2 shape during a world championship, that would easily have been good enough to make the team, but it wouldn't mean he was in peak form, or anywhere near it.

                  Originally posted by EPelle
                  Again, with respect to these previous athletes, how many races have the Borlées run in comparison? Their chances are far superior to their predecessors.
                  That may well be. For the umpteenth time, I repeat: I'm not stating they will fail in Berlin. All I'm saying is: don't automatically assume if the guy ran 44.78 in mid-June, he's going to go faster in August. It may work, or it may not.

                  Originally posted by EPelle
                  Who were those twins, again?
                  Erm... are there really that many sets of Swedish twins who are both world-class athletes? :shock:
                  Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Gold?

                    Ok....let's not get ahead of ourselves here....

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Powell
                      Originally posted by EPelle
                      Who were those twins, again?
                      Erm... are there really that many sets of Swedish twins who are both world-class athletes? :shock:
                      Alas, Powell, we arrive. Since we were completely, utterly and unmistakingly discussing the 400m, neither of the Kallur sisters should have been brought up in this discussion. Changing that dynamic opens the door for any number of other events where NCAA athletes - now men and women - excelled in the USA, came to Europe and then excelled at a major championships. If that is how you'd like to conclude your evening, the Borlée twins have an even greater shot at being able to peak again in august than athletes compared to them in their same event.

                      The 44,78 was run off of how many races, Powell?

                      What you are considering intensity may simply have been a greater capacity to take on the increased workload resulting from last year's 43s relay splits and excellent 400m running in the Olympics.

                      This entire discussion about the NCAA system is actually quite silly. These two were Olympians before the stepped down to the NCAA level, had already run in the 43s on a relay and now, following a few low-rent relay splits, a couple of rounds of 400m racing and one good meet (NCAA) they are headed back up to the world level again. However, I understand your continued bias here, as in 2006, you stated: "Of those top European talents that go down the NCAA route, very few progress well."

                      Finally: "We had some concerns about training in United States, but after visiting the University they've all disappeared," said Jonathan Borlée to EAA last february.

                      Comment


                      • When someone not from the USA breaks into the world all-time top 70 performances in the 400, give me a call.

                        The NCAA system may be at its most effective in producing great 4x400 runners, no matter the nationality.

                        Comment


                        • Poppa Borlee is their coach, and himself a Euro medalist. He timed their peak to perfection last year, both running PB's in Beijing....infact, they have PB'd at every major since the youth scene. I completely trust the man to look after his sons. One of them will be in the final by Berlin, no doubt about it. The Euro record is far more impressive than it's given credit for. Super talented, experienced guys have tried and failed to get it. I would be stunned if Jonathan managed it this year.

                          Personally I don't know why Europeans bother with the NCAA. The education is rarely a priority or prestigious and they are bled dry for the sake of a College/State that they have no ties to.

                          Hannah England was quite smart, a year at FSU, has the american experience, wins an NCAA title and heads home.. At a middle distance meeting in the UK this weekend there were a litany of times that would have medalled at NCAA's from students in their teens and early 20's. One that stood out was Rose -Anne Galligan who spent a year at Tennesse, disliked it....was ruined for most of last year and then ran 4'13 in a B race against a host of other students. Lots of teenage girls under 16 minutes for 5k too. I think Euro athletes take the scholarships for the experience of living in the states and having a novel lifestyle. I find it hard to believe that someone like Sonia O'Sullivan wouldn't have been just as big a star without her stay stateside. Some would argue it may have hindered her in the earlier years on the international scene.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by 3a
                            Poppa Borlee is their coach, and himself a Euro medalist. He timed their peak to perfection last year, both running PB's in Beijing....infact, they have PB'd at every major since the youth scene. I completely trust the man to look after his sons. One of them will be in the final by Berlin, no doubt about it. The Euro record is far more impressive than it's given credit for. Super talented, experienced guys have tried and failed to get it. I would be stunned if Jonathan managed it this year.

                            Personally I don't know why Europeans bother with the NCAA. The education is rarely a priority or prestigious and they are bled dry for the sake of a College/State that they have no ties to.

                            Hannah England was quite smart, a year at FSU, has the american experience, wins an NCAA title and heads home.. At a middle distance meeting in the UK this weekend there were a litany of times that would have medalled at NCAA's from students in their teens and early 20's. One that stood out was Rose -Anne Galligan who spent a year at Tennesse, disliked it....was ruined for most of last year and then ran 4'13 in a B race against a host of other students. Lots of teenage girls under 16 minutes for 5k too. I think Euro athletes take the scholarships for the experience of living in the states and having a novel lifestyle. I find it hard to believe that someone like Sonia O'Sullivan wouldn't have been just as big a star without her stay stateside. Some would argue it may have hindered her in the earlier years on the international scene.
                            Jacques Borlee is quite the coach. It is my understanding that Jon and Kevin were to race as little as possible at FSU per their dad. FSU honored that as the brothers only ran 1 open during the outdoor, enough to qualify for regions.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by EPelle
                              Originally posted by Powell
                              Originally posted by EPelle
                              Who were those twins, again?
                              Erm... are there really that many sets of Swedish twins who are both world-class athletes? :shock:
                              Alas, Powell, we arrive. Since we were completely, utterly and unmistakingly discussing the 400m, neither of the Kallur sisters should have been brought up in this discussion. Changing that dynamic opens the door for any number of other events where NCAA athletes - now men and women - excelled in the USA, came to Europe and then excelled at a major championships. If that is how you'd like to conclude your evening, the Borlée twins have an even greater shot at being able to peak again in august than athletes compared to them in their same event.

                              The 44,78 was run off of how many races, Powell?

                              What you are considering intensity may simply have been a greater capacity to take on the increased workload resulting from last year's 43s relay splits and excellent 400m running in the Olympics.

                              This entire discussion about the NCAA system is actually quite silly. These two were Olympians before the stepped down to the NCAA level, had already run in the 43s on a relay and now, following a few low-rent relay splits, a couple of rounds of 400m racing and one good meet (NCAA) they are headed back up to the world level again. However, I understand your continued bias here, as in 2006, you stated: "Of those top European talents that go down the NCAA route, very few progress well."

                              Finally: "We had some concerns about training in United States, but after visiting the University they've all disappeared," said Jonathan Borlée to EAA last february.
                              What concerns???

                              This whole "NCAA will ruin our athletes" is non-sense.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by justblaze1011

                                What concerns???

                                This whole "NCAA will ruin our athletes" is non-sense.
                                It's especially hard to see how people come to that conclusion regarding our quarter-milers.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X