Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Vlasic - Friedrich, different characters.

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Vlasic - Friedrich, different characters.

    Interesting to read Friedrich saying she likes to take few jumps since she feels the more jumps you take the higher the chances for errors.

    Obviously Vlasic does not agree with this. She thrives on many jumps and prefers to work herself into "the Zone" more gradually.

    This time Friedrich's extremely confident and gutsy approach worked but going from 2.00 to 2.06 might not be possible every time.

    But Friedrich is a breath of fresh air and she clearly has the upper hand right now.

    They are exactly the same age but Vlasic has jumped much longer on the world level and might have reached her ultimate level.

    Slesarenko attempted 2.10 in Athens after winning at 2.06, not 2.09 as somebody suggested.

  • #2
    I have never seen any actual statistics on the matter, but have long had the
    subjective impression that (succesfully) jumping at many heights can be
    beneficial for record purposes, despite the extra effort spended. In
    particular, I have repeatedly run across articles stating things a long the
    lines of ``Despite having jumped at every height since X.XX, Y set a new
    record.'' If anyone has more detailed data on heights attempted for e.g. world
    and area records, this could be interesting to investigate.

    (The risk of making six centimeter skips vs. the risk of growing tired and/or
    having an accidental three strikes on ``too low'' heights, is another matter.)

    Comment


    • #3
      To quote her:

      "At 1.79m tall, I am tiny compared to other high jumpers but I'm very dynamic, explosive and bouncy but this type of jumping also expends a lot of energy. It is brash and nasty, but I also love to play 'high jump' poker and these psychological games during the competitions," added the 25-year-old.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Vlasic - Friedrich, different characters.

        Originally posted by Per Andersen
        But Friedrich is a breath of fresh air and she clearly has the upper hand right now.

        They are exactly the same age but Vlasic has jumped much longer on the world level and might have reached her ultimate level.
        I've wondered if Vlasic has reached her ultimate level since the end of the 2007 season. She jumped so well that year, not only technically, but also pure height off the ground, that my gut instinct suggested it could be now or never for a WR from her. Since then she's declined (please, no need to start quoting 1 or 2cm differences. She was clearing 2.05m by miles that year, she no longer is).

        However, there's no doubt in my mind that Friedrich is the best thing that could have happened for both the event and Vlasic. I love the way she jumps and am full of admiration for the fire in her belly. I suspect that she has a personality type that thrives on pressure and adrenalin, and coming in late and missing heights is an integral part of her make-up. She deliberately puts herself under pressure and responds wonderfully well. She'll undoubtedly bomb sooner-or-later, but for now it's working.

        I have no idea what the norms are for heights jumped prior to a record, but am sure each athlete has their own progression preference. It's the most unique of events in many ways and I celebrate an individual like Friedrich emerging with what works for her. I also have a preference for jumpers who are not unusually tall. Vlasic has a major advantage here - when she attempted 2.06m at the weekend it was 13cms above her head height, for Friedrich it was 27cms. Guess who's the greater talent?

        One final thing, as I've mentioned before, a WR is a WR for a reason and is an incredibly difficult thing to achieve in a mature event. Everyone thought Vlasic was a sure thing two years ago, and now people are saying Friedrich got close last weekend. Neither is, or was true. Usually, although there are exceptions, the only really true "close" attempt in the Flop is when the jumper is over the bar and the smallest nick with their heels takes the bar off. Nothing will dissuade me from the opinion that Vlasic has jumped far too much in the past three seasons and has been wrong in attempting 2.10m so many times. With Friedrich pushing her, or rather Vlasic now chasing Friedrich, I hope one outcome of her being in a more consistently competitive environment, and not just giving demonstrations, will be the end of this nonsense and she'll make more attempts at 2.06m-2.07m-2.08m and maybe even 2.09m.

        I'm looking forward to watching these two this season and hope that each push the other to greater heights. This should be the best thing that's happened to Vlasic...

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Vlasic - Friedrich, different characters.

          Originally posted by marknhj
          Vlasic has a major advantage here - when she attempted 2.06m at the weekend it was 13cms above her head height, for Friedrich it was 27cms. Guess who's the greater talent?
          Interesting observation that might even be broken down further to the height of the hips? Some people have incredibly long backs relative to their legs, so height alone might not be the advantage. Are all high jumpers long legged? It seems like that is where the true biomechanical advantage might lie.

          Comment


          • #6
            It does appear to me that Vlasic has dropped a few grams this season; she looks leaner in the upper body. If she has done so - and deliberately, perhaps she believed she was too heavy to reach the highest heights she attempted.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Vlasic - Friedrich, different characters.

              Originally posted by Daisy
              Interesting observation that might even be broken down further to the height of the hips? Some people have incredibly long backs relative to their legs, so height alone might not be the advantage. Are all high jumpers long legged? It seems like that is where the true biomechanical advantage might lie.
              The height of their center of gravity is the most significant factor. Some tall jumpers don't have particularly long legs, Acuff being a prime example.

              Comment


              • #8
                Any picture of both of them standing next to each other? Friedrich certainly seems to have very long legs.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jeremyp
                  Any picture of both of them standing next to each other? Friedrich certainly seems to have very long legs.
                  But I would not call her tiny. Bergqvist is more than one inch shorter at 1.75. Chaunte Howard is 1.75 and Slesarenko is the same height as Friedrich.

                  I think for Vlasic being 1.92 tall she looks extremely good over the bar but she never struck me as somebody being extremely athletic. She has this somewhat ponderous, flat footed way of running. Can't remember exactly how tall Kostadinova was, 5-11? but her run-up had a very different lightness and swiftness.

                  I agree with Mark that Friedrich could be the best thing to happen for both of them.

                  Unless Friedrich turns out to be too disruptive in Vlasic's orderly universe :wink:

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    By the way, who is the female announcer on the women's high jump clip on the home page? Ritter?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Peter Michaelson
                      By the way, who is the female announcer on the women's high jump clip on the home page? Ritter?
                      Wow! We think alike. I just came on to ask the same question. I know the voice drives me crazy, but I'll take it over Carol Lewis'.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by imaginative
                        I have never seen any actual statistics on the matter, but have long had the
                        subjective impression that (succesfully) jumping at many heights can be
                        beneficial for record purposes, despite the extra effort spended. In
                        particular, I have repeatedly run across articles stating things a long the
                        lines of ``Despite having jumped at every height since X.XX, Y set a new
                        record.'' If anyone has more detailed data on heights attempted for e.g. world
                        and area records, this could be interesting to investigate.

                        (The risk of making six centimeter skips vs. the risk of growing tired and/or
                        having an accidental three strikes on ``too low'' heights, is another matter.)
                        I seem to remember Yashchenko started very low (2.03?) when he set his first WR in 1977, and took innumerable jumps ...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by berkeley
                          I seem to remember Yashchenko started very low (2.03?) when he set his first WR in 1977, and took innumerable jumps ...
                          And the WJr record was made in a sequence of 11 jumps at 11 heights (i.e., all "O"s), and then passing/stopping

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Peter Michaelson
                            By the way, who is the female announcer on the women's high jump clip on the home page? Ritter?

                            Ritter used to have a Texas drawl...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by EPelle
                              It does appear to me that Vlasic has dropped a few grams this season; she looks leaner in the upper body. If she has done so - and deliberately, perhaps she believed she was too heavy to reach the highest heights she attempted.

                              But if she lost too much muscle mass, she'll really be in a pickle.


                              [Second HJ thread wherein I've used that pun. Warning: I fully intend to repeat it until it is acknowleged, one way or the other. I have a keyboard and I'm not afraid to use it...]



                              Silliness aside, lots of fun to read what you folks who actually know the event have to say. A question: In personal opinion(s), who among female jumpers, past or present, is considered to be the purist "power jumper"--? Ackerman? Simeoni? Someone modern day?

                              Thanks, if anyone answers. If the question is too banal, I apologize in advance.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X